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DickJ

iPhone Photographer

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I will probably get the red flag for this -- but I like his images. They do say it is the photographer -- not the equipment.

 

Paulette

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I have no problem with this either. Photography is a 'broad church'. I was out shooting today with my kit lens (Nikon 18-70), which a lot of photographers would laugh at...

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A good friend of mine, an art teacher and photography professor at a major university, fell ill with cancer.  As his strength waned he was no longer able to handle his heavy DSLR equipment and resorted to his iPhone in his last days.  The images can't be enlarged greatly but some of his best and most poignant work was captured using his phone.

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For a real eye-opener and more than a little bit of putting-"problems"-into-perspective, check out Flo Fox's story.

 

dd

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Sad thing to admit that I have once again moved into an industry that the proverbial bottom has fallen out of. Not against mobile photos, this was the mainstay of my whole holiday to Cyprus recently because I didn't want to take my 7D but I think replacing mobile phone pictures in everyday life is a little worrying. Will no one need hi res images anymore? 

 

When I got into IT I was astounded at the amount of peers that just use google to fix a problem and the same went for folk fixing computers at home. Just google it. 

 

Coming off the back of the news that about 50 sports photogs were just let go from Reuters lately without even as much as a leaving card, paints a very bleak picture for photography. In fact its not even photography, because they encompasses capturing an image using anything. However, its the need or lack of need for the time served pro. 

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It's the world as it is now Paul - much as I would like to Canute-like turn back the waves - it just ain't going to happen. 

 

High end video with still capture at a quality level was already rattling the cages of the dedicated sports stills photographers - and the vast numbers of competent hobbyists with equipment that matches the skills of many professionals means that the full-time pro will become rarer and rarer. 

 

Who would have thought that even Joe Public would be pinging his images into newspapers and television just a few years ago - they do - because they can......it is no longer necessary to understand the principles of photography for much published work - your camera and computer will do that for you.  The work of the real pro with this type of equipment will still stand out but he will become increasingly rare.

 

The market now is fast heading towards the "that'll do - as long as it is cheap" mentality - it is called PROGRESS - I don't like it but I've lived long enough to realize my limitations - you are young - it is over to you to change the world - try to make it better..........

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It's the world as it is now Paul - much as I would like to Canute-like turn back the waves - it just ain't going to happen. 

 

High end video with still capture at a quality level was already rattling the cages of the dedicated sports stills photographers - and the vast numbers of competent hobbyists with equipment that matches the skills of many professionals means that the full-time pro will become rarer and rarer. 

 

Who would have thought that even Joe Public would be pinging his images into newspapers and television just a few years ago - they do - because they can......it is no longer necessary to understand the principles of photography for much published work - your camera and computer will do that for you.  The work of the real pro with this type of equipment will still stand out but he will become increasingly rare.

 

The market now is fast heading towards the "that'll do - as long as it is cheap" mentality - it is called PROGRESS - I don't like it but I've lived long enough to realize my limitations - you are young - it is over to you to change the world - try to make it better..........

 

Very well put :) 

 

It's a shame because people need a role model, or a mentor and if we're all scrambling about finding our own feet, the true masters will be lost to the tech. 

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I am now in my 70s, an old fogey as some would say, but when the day comes when smartphones are the norm the word 'suicide' springs to mind.  It's unimaginable to see the likes of David Bailey, Terence Donovan, Larry Burrows, Don McCullin and all the other great photographers shooting wars and fashion using a smartphone. It just makes me smile, because it will not happen.  

Smartphone cameras are for those who have the attitude "it'll do", probably because they are too idle to carry the correct equipment. I have yet to see a smartphone with interchangeable and\or zoom  lenses.

No doubt someone younger will prove me wrong, I welcome all comments. Me, I still intend to call myself a photographer.

Best to all,

Brian

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Brian,

I guess some of what you said will not happen is happening. We frequently see the results of the immediacy of mobile phone reportage from Syria on the TV and in the papers. I guess that folk on site when something shocking happens will simply use their mobiles - why pay a reporter to photograph it when this happens? 
Sadly, the likes of those you quoted, and others too, are icons of a bygone era by and large. There are those who might agrue that they used new fangled equipment in their day when they could have used 5X4 or 10X8 cameras? It's all relative.

 

I agree with your sentiments but the world just rolls on...

nj.

Edited by Nick Jenkins
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Nick,

Thanks for your sensible reply.  

I am an old fogey, I still believe if I want to take photographs  use a camera and if I want to speak to someone a distance away  use a phone. 

Yep, the world rolls on, but not always in the right direction. As there are many facets of photography this discussion could go on forever.

Cheers,

Brian

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There is NOTHING wrong with being an old fogey - the Alamy forum is littered with us. With hindsight comes wisdom.

:)

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Let's face it, everything depends on which side of the fence you stand on. Industries and business change constantly and all must learn how to adapt.

 

I have a website selling custom equestrian and dog supplies. If it hadn't been for the web, I never could have competed against the big boys, and would have had to have an outrageous advertising budget. Now I compete on an even keel.

 

How many of us have sympathy for the communications industry? People have been dropping their land lines because what was the point in having a cell phone and a land phone?  Skype, BBM, Facetime, good cell phone packages, all make the long distance land line business (which phone companies used to make great profits on) almost extinct.

 

I'm sure almost everyone here has a website promoting their photos to a worldwide audience. Tough to do before the web. So in a practical sense, although you may get less for a photo, your customer base is much larger, but of course its also easier for your compeition.

 

And instead of investing in chemicals, photo paper, film, enlargers and all the other darkroom equipment, we can invest in good cameras and glass.

 

As stated, its the photographer, not the equipment that makes a good photograph. The equipment makes the photograph top quality, but a badly composed photo won't sell no matter how good the equipment.

 

I have taken some really great photos with my BB Z10.  Not able to upload to Alamy, but great just the same. I wouldn't be surprised if the day came when your phone could also take lenses.

 

Since the beginning of time, business and industry has had to deal with monumental change. And since we can't stop it (at least the part that interferes with our world) we must adapt to it.

 

Jill

 

 

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There is NOTHING wrong with being an old fogey - the Alamy forum is littered with us. With hindsight comes wisdom.

:)

 

Hey! Who are you calling an old fogey? :angry:

 

Allan (68yrs and proud of it.) B)

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Allan,

At 68 you're still a whipper snapper. But keep up the good work, and like me, taking the pills.

 

Brian

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There is NOTHING wrong with being an old fogey - the Alamy forum is littered with us. With hindsight comes wisdom.

:)

 

Can't hear you, Nick, can you speak up a bit. Now where did I put my glasses?...

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There is NOTHING wrong with being an old fogey - the Alamy forum is littered with us. With hindsight comes wisdom.

:)

 

Can't hear you, Nick, can you speak up a bit. Now where did I put my glasses?...

 

Quarter past two

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Since the beginning of time, business and industry has had to deal with monumental change. And since we can't stop it (at least the part that interferes with our world) we must adapt to it.

 

Spot on... and the rest of your post as well. The world is changing... sometimes at bewildering speed. And every change can be seen as a new opportunity... or an excuse for wandering off down Memory Lane, and wondering why everything's not as good as it used to be.

 

The old certainties about writing and photography (my two areas of interest) are gone, so I need to adapt or pack it in. And most other industries and professions are having to adapt as well. While bakers, undertakers and tax collectors may be OK for the forseeable future, for everyone else the commercial rules seem to be rewritten on an annual basis...

Edited by John Morrison

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I am now in my 70s, an old fogey as some would say, but when the day comes when smartphones are the norm the word 'suicide' springs to mind.  It's unimaginable to see the likes of David Bailey, Terence Donovan, Larry Burrows, Don McCullin and all the other great photographers shooting wars and fashion using a smartphone. It just makes me smile, because it will not happen.  

Smartphone cameras are for those who have the attitude "it'll do", probably because they are too idle to carry the correct equipment. I have yet to see a smartphone with interchangeable and\or zoom  lenses.

No doubt someone younger will prove me wrong, I welcome all comments. Me, I still intend to call myself a photographer.

Best to all,

Brian

 

There are various lenses and holders available for iphone, etc

 

I am younger than you but not much :)

 

http://photojojo.com/store/awesomeness/cell-phone-lenses/

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I am an old fart as well - not that it is relevant.

 

Just look at the pics. No disrespect to any photog, ever - "art" is "art". But if thats the technical quality we need to aim for - then both we and Alamy have it wrong. And I am not saying that is a wrong way to think. Maybe the media world is getting to grips with the fact that you don't need technical quality for virtually all editorial applications these days. Lets be open about this, what do you truly need for an editorial image - 3 Mpx? Why the hangup about 10 mpx plus? Editorial does not need 10 mpx plus and thats why they won't pay for it in the current market. Our images/technical standards are worth very little at reduced sizes.

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