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Hello everyone,

   I am shopping for a new camera and want to make sure it is an approved camera.  Also, I am hoping to hear from you which cameras are your favorite.  Thanks.

 

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There are others better placed than me to make such recommendations and they will be helped if you an say what kind of budget you have and what kind(s) of photography or subject matter you have in mind. 

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Get something secondhand for around £300 and you can't go far wrong.

 

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Hi Jaimie,

Alamy no longer has an approved camera list. They simply state that they require " Photos from a DSLR (or equivalent) camera that has a minimum of 6 megapixels
Cameras with less than this won’t be able to produce a good enough quality to pass QC, or for us to sell."

 

I think the main question for you is whether you buy new or second hand and what budget as per the posts above.

 

And also a major question these days is whether to go for a DLSR (digital single lens reflex) or a mirrorless system. Mirrorless systems are more compact, but the latest models can be pretty expensive. I think judging from recent posts, a lot of contributors these days use mirrorless. Mirrorless camera don't have an optical viewfinder, but an electronic one. I assume these are pretty good on the latest models.

 

p.s. Just to confuse you, I have a digital viewfinder on my Sony A77 DSLR. I quite like it, it shows all the effects/adjustments you make in real time so you know what the picture will look like before you take it.

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If you want a straight recommendation, a second-hand Sony A58 with low shutter count and kit lens at about £200. It's what I have.

Edit:  don't know what country you're in.

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I've time to kill so here is chapter and verse....

 

I hesitate to recommend a  particular camera because people have different needs and budgets.

 

In order to pass QC here you need to have a camera with a large enough sensor and the minimum is probably the Sony RX100 and its variants with a sensor measuring 13.2 x 8.8 mm.

 

At the other extreme are full frame cameras 36 x 24 mm, and between the two, APS - C cameras with sensors around 23.6 x 15.7 mm ( there are variants).

 

The larger the sensor the larger and heavier the camera body, but, in particular, the lenses are a good deal larger and heavier. However, for a given level of technology, the larger the sensor the better the image quality. Having said that, quality can be defined as fitness for purpose and for stock shooting you don't essentially need a large sensor.

 

I own a full frame camera and do like the appearance of the images it produces, the depth of field is limited and backgrounds are easily thrown out of focus. However I don't like lugging it, and the lenses, around so I use an APS-C camera for almost all of my stock shooting. If you are young and fit this might not be such an issue!

 

The other thing to consider is mirrorless against DSLR.

 

Conventional DSLRs have optical viewfinders, the more expensive cameras have a glass pentaprism to flip the image through 90 deg, while cheaper cameras use mirrors. The pentaprism gives a brighter viewfinder image, but it is heavy. 

 

More recently mirrorless cameras have become available with electronic viewfinders, so they don't need mirrors or a  pentaprism. As a result they are smaller and lighter than DSLRs while offering the same image quality (generally using an equivalent sensor to that  fitted to a DSLR). Not everyone likes an electronic viewfinder, but the latest versions are very good and, personally, I would not now go back to an optical viewfinder. For sports photography, where you need to capture rapid movement, the optical finder might still offer an advantage.

 

Mirrorless full frame cameras are smaller and lighter than equivalent DSLRs, but the lenses are much the same, and the lenses are the heaviest bits!

 

A full frame camera with a mega lens looks impressive and, for commissioned work, the clients might expect that kind of thing. A small mirrorless camera could be mistaken for an amateur shooters bit of kit and is less threatening, possibly better for surreptitious shooting.

 

 

 

 

Edited by Bryan
  • Upvote 3

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On 12/13/2017 at 09:56, JaimieTuchman said:

Hello everyone,

   I am shopping for a new camera and want to make sure it is an approved camera.  Also, I am hoping to hear from you which cameras are your favorite.  Thanks.

 

 

I can see this thread going on for a long time.  :-)

 

I used to shoot what is referred to as a full frame (FF or FX) DSLR.  I've shot with a Nikon D3, D3s, and D4.  They produce great images but as stated above, they are big and heavy and that is without a quality lens attached like a 24-70mm f2.8.  The full frame Nikon D850 is total overkill for stock (46MP).  You simply don't need that many pixels.  I know, they are nice to have hanging around to crop into but it invites a whole host of other problems with it.  The Canon work horse is the 5D MkIV.  IMHO, it too is overkill at 30MP.  Oh, and these cameras tend to be very expensive unless bought used.

 

I've also shot a little with the very small micro 4/3s system from Olympus, the OMD E-M1 MkII.  It is small, easy to carry, has great lenses but the sensor is very small.  This means less dynamic range for one thing.  And that was the one thing that turned me off this format.  I found, in great light, the camera was superb but, I rarely get to shoot in great light.  A lot of the time I'm shooting in very contrasty light, with deep shadows and very bright highlights.  This system just wasn't up to what I was looking for.

 

For stock, I want something that will generally always be with me.  The big DSLR's and even the Sony full frame mirrorless cameras don't fit that criteria.  I also need something that has pretty decent dynamic range.  I have settled on the Fuji mirrorless line of cameras.  They use an APS-C, crop, sensor, that is larger than micro 4/3's but smaller than full frame; kind of like Goldilocks for me.

 

The cameras are small and light and not too expensive.  The lenses are superb and half the price of comparable full frame lenses.  Image quality is superb.  I take my Fuji with me everywhere.  It fits in the center console of my Subaru.  It is a mirrorless system so that is something to consider.  Some folks just don't like mirrorless cameras.

 

It looks like you might be from Florida from the 6 images you have.  I would go to the largest Best Buy store you can find and see if they have a large camera department.  The Best Buy store in Birmingham Alabama is, apparently huge, as I've been told.  They even have the $3300 Nikon D850 on display along with many other brands so perhaps you can find one.  Camera stores are a vanishing breed.

 

The other option is to rent a camera and lens to see if you like it.  That is how I have finally made my decision to stick with Fuji for stock.

 

You will get many other recommendations here and everyone will have a valid point, for them.  My advice is no different.  This is what works for me but you may have other requirements or interests.

 

Rick

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Like Rick I've used various systems in the past and have settled on Fuji X cameras. One of the things to note is that, if you're looking at a limited budget, it will likely mean starting with an 18-55mm kit lens. Fuji's is particularly good optically, but more than that it's very well constructed with a metal barrel and a tight fit -- no wobble whatsoever and certainly no plasticky feel. That can be said of Fuji lenses in general. If you need lightning fast autofocus, on the other hand, Fuji has some stiff competition.

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Like DDoug I have tried and used various systems in the past. Last one was Nikon. I have now settled on Sony and use their FF, APS-C and 1" sensor cameras.

 

As Sony make most of the sensors which are put into other manufactures camera bodies, I think it makes sense to use Sony cameras as they know their sensors inside out and the firmware used in Sony bodies will take full advantage of Sony's knowledge of the sensors.

 

I also like most of Sony lenses, yes their Zeiss variants, as well as Sony's own for the FF and APS-C bodies. The 1" cameras have are the RX100 mk1 and mk3.

 

Over to you.

 

Allan

 

 

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6 hours ago, Allan Bell said:

 

Like DDoug I have tried and used various systems in the past. Last one was Nikon. I have now settled on Sony and use their FF, APS-C and 1" sensor cameras.

 

As Sony make most of the sensors which are put into other manufactures camera bodies, I think it makes sense to use Sony cameras as they know their sensors inside out and the firmware used in Sony bodies will take full advantage of Sony's knowledge of the sensors.

 

I also like most of Sony lenses, yes their Zeiss variants, as well as Sony's own for the FF and APS-C bodies. The 1" cameras have are the RX100 mk1 and mk3.

 

Over to you.

 

Allan

 

 

 

I have to agree with Allan on one point here.  Sony makes a darn good camera in the new A7r MkIII.  A lot of pros are now shooting with the Sony A7r series of cameras.  I have been seriously considering them but the cost, size & weight of the better GMaster lenses are a big negative for me.  The image quality and the flexibility of that camera are awesome however!

 

Rick

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The only reservations  I have about Sony are about durability, having had one lose its Live View alignment, another peg out at under 35000 images and my current one wth a permanent IS error message having been dropped a couple of inches. But I keep buying them.

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On 13/12/2017 at 15:56, JaimieTuchman said:

Hello everyone,

   I am shopping for a new camera and want to make sure it is an approved camera.  Also, I am hoping to hear from you which cameras are your favorite.  Thanks.

 

 

You haven't said what type of photography you are into and what sort of direction you are taking in photography which is pretty fundamental to getting relevant answers, nor do you mention your budget. 

  • Upvote 1

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When I moved from Nikon D90 + kit lense to D800 + premium prime lenses I got a big improvement in image quality. I can see a difference even at thumbnail size. But the weight of lagging that lot around can be back breaking.

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2 minutes ago, andremichel said:

When I moved from Nikon D90 + kit lense to D800 + premium prime lenses I got a big improvement in image quality. I can see a difference even at thumbnail size. But the weight of lagging that lot around can be back breaking.

That’s why I sold my D800 and went Fuji. 

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+1 for the Fujifilm system and another +1 for the 18-55mm "kit" lens (it's a rock star)

 

Fuji is consistently updating firmware thus improving and adding new capabilities to their cameras and lenses. I also like the user interface of the cameras with their analog dials and customized function buttons. It's a personal choice and the specs along don't tell the whole story, I would recommend holding and using as many contenders as possible. 

 

Hope this helps

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Once people hold and shoot a Fujifilm camera, they fall in love with the knobs and buttons which make it so easy to change settings.

 

My X-T2 has the ISO dial, shutter speed, and exposure comp dials at my fingertips. Then it has a toggle switch to move the focus point around, so much better than rocking a main dial.

Betty

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Any camera that can provide images at a minimum uncompressed (open) file size of 17 mp. Or maybe think about an iphone and submit to Stockimo.

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16 hours ago, Betty LaRue said:

Once people hold and shoot a Fujifilm camera, they fall in love with the knobs and buttons which make it so easy to change settings.

 

My X-T2 has the ISO dial, shutter speed, and exposure comp dials at my fingertips. Then it has a toggle switch to move the focus point around, so much better than rocking a main dial.

Betty

 

Yes exactly Betty that was what happened to me. Pity they used there own peculiar sensor array instead of the Bayer array.

 

If Fuji had fitted the Bayer sensor in the first place I would still have my Fuji kit plus a few of the new bodies and lenses.

 

Possibly Sony would not be so high in the hardware selling stakes either.

 

Allan

 

 

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7 hours ago, Allan Bell said:

 

Yes exactly Betty that was what happened to me. Pity they used there own peculiar sensor array instead of the Bayer array.

 

If Fuji had fitted the Bayer sensor in the first place I would still have my Fuji kit plus a few of the new bodies and lenses.

 

Possibly Sony would not be so high in the hardware selling stakes either.

 

Allan

 

 

Take a peek at my images, Allan. I’m doing just fine with that sensor! LR is handling the RAF foliage better than when you had your Fuji.

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7 hours ago, Allan Bell said:

 

Yes exactly Betty that was what happened to me. Pity they used there own peculiar sensor array instead of the Bayer array.

 

If Fuji had fitted the Bayer sensor in the first place I would still have my Fuji kit plus a few of the new bodies and lenses.

 

Possibly Sony would not be so high in the hardware selling stakes either.

 

Allan

 

 

 

I have to admit that I am not a fan of the "X-trans" sensor, but, since moving to Capture One Pro 11, I'm pretty happy with my Fuji.  For me it comes down to size, weight, APS-C sensor, lens selection, and reasonable price to make me forget about the X-trans thing.  I'll be upgrading my Fuji gear, modestly, after the first of the year.  I'm just tired of carrying big heavy expensive gear around.

 

Rick

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On ‎16‎/‎12‎/‎2017 at 06:27, spacecadet said:

The only reservations  I have about Sony are about durability, having had one lose its Live View alignment, another peg out at under 35000 images and my current one wth a permanent IS error message having been dropped a couple of inches. But I keep buying them.

 

Totally agree, I've had the Sony NEX6 and now the Sony A6000. The NEX6 developed a problem with the back screen after approx 12 months. My A6000 died after 3 months while on an overseas holiday, then again 2 years later while on another holiday. All fixable and thankfully still under an extended warranty but very frustrating. I've been looking at the Fuji X-T20 as a replacement but keep talking myself out of it as I love the weight and image quality of the Sony - plus I don't have the spare cash at the moment.

 

Would I buy another Sony? Probably not! In saying that my RX100 M1 hasn't missed a beat!!!

 

Carole

Edited by Carole Lloyd

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3 hours ago, Carole Lloyd said:

 

Totally agree, I've had the Sony NEX6 and now the Sony A6000. The NEX6 developed a problem with the back screen after approx 12 months. My A6000 died after 3 months while on an overseas holiday, then again 2 years later while on another holiday. All fixable and thankfully still under an extended warranty but very frustrating. I've been looking at the Fuji X-T20 as a replacement but keep talking myself out of it as I love the weight and image quality of the Sony - plus I don't have the spare cash at the moment.

 

Would I buy another Sony? Probably not! In saying that my RX100 M1 hasn't missed a beat!!!

 

Carole

To be fair I dropped the first one, 5 years, the second was bought used and lasted 3, but they're the cheapest going if you buy older models used and there's no learnng curve.

Edited by spacecadet

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15 hours ago, Betty LaRue said:

Take a peek at my images, Allan. I’m doing just fine with that sensor! LR is handling the RAF foliage better than when you had your Fuji.

 

I am of the opinion that Fuji realised their error in trying out the new X-trans sensor in the X-T1 and that is why they changed back to a Bayer sensor in the medium format GSX. The GSX is probably mainly used by the wealthy professional portrait and landscape photographers who demand the best resolution from their sensors.:)

 

Allan

 

 

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I've had my a6000 for around three years and no problems.  I bought a used Sony a7 (original model) which has a somewhat dodgy lens mount (have the replacement mount but am waiting for JIS screwdrivers to show up) and a recent new a7 which doesn't.  The a7 original model is now under $1000 for anyone wanting full frame and it and an a6000 make a nice pair that can share lenses in a pinch.   The good lenses aren't cheap, though.  

 

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9 hours ago, Allan Bell said:

 

I am of the opinion that Fuji realised their error in trying out the new X-trans sensor in the X-T1 and that is why they changed back to a Bayer sensor in the medium format GSX. The GSX is probably mainly used by the wealthy professional portrait and landscape photographers who demand the best resolution from their sensors.:)

 

Allan

 

 

 

Allan, I think Fuji put a bayer sensor in the GFX to save on production cost.  X-trans sensors are quite expensive to produce from what I've read.  Fuji had a price point they wanted (read, had) to meet and needed to make concessions.  Personally, I would probably buy a Nikon D850 before investing in the GFX, if I needed all those pixels, which I don't.  More bang for your buck as they say.

 

I'll be going with the X-T2 or perhaps this new unicorn I keep reading about, the Fuji X-H1.  We'll see.

 

Rick

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