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The Italian Amalfi coast town of Positano is asking for a Eu1000 permit before allowing commercial photography. A video licence will cost Eu2000.  Educational, journalistic or private use will be exempt.

 

Will existing photos be  exempt?

 

Thin end of the wedge?

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The Italian Amalfi coast town of Positano is asking for a Eu1000 permit before allowing commercial photography. 

 

I was recently at the Uffizi gallery in Florence and saw a sign at the entrance that said no high definition or commercial was allowed.

 

Must be tough to enforce this nonsense. 

 

I also recall they (tried to) ban selfie sticks in major Italian touristic sites. I still see them around everywhere. 

 

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Oops. I have quite a few from Positano on sale, but I was definitely a journalist senza tripod. Definitely. Good to know though  - I was thinking of going back to shoot some more stuff along the coast and in Capri as well in early December, so my lovely Positano landlord (fab hilltop flat with huge terrace overlooking the sea and Positano/coast, and its own lemon tree!) will miss out and I'll go elsewhere instead. Maybe France. Positano shooting itself in the piede, me ffinks.

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Technically speaking, editorial photography isn't commercial photography. Can't all images taken in places like Positano just be marked as "editorial only"?

 

Sounds like the proverbial tax grab to me. Don't see how policies like this can be enforced with general, walk-around photography.

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Perhaps this permit is aimed at the wedding photography market?   

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I was at the Valley of the Kings at Luxor a few weeks ago. There are signs everywhere stating that absolutely no photos are allowed, and that fines will be imposed or the camera confiscated. So I left my camera in our minibus. Only to get really annoyed by many of the other tourists blatantly taking photos with their phones, or small cameras, even using selfie sticks. There were police armed with guns, but they ignored the behaviour. 

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 I was thinking of going back to shoot some more stuff along the coast and in Capri

 

Cinque Terre is amazing as well.

 

painter-at-vernazzo-in-cinque-terre-italy-HPHEY7.jpg

Edited by Brasilnut
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27 minutes ago, digi2ap said:

Perhaps this permit is aimed at the wedding photography market?   

 

Also, fashion shoots?

 

33 minutes ago, John Mitchell said:

Technically speaking, editorial photography isn't commercial photography. Can't all images taken in places like Positano just be marked as "editorial only"?

 

Sounds like the proverbial tax grab to me. Don't see how policies like this can be enforced with general, walk-around photography.

 

As "journalistic" use is ok, surely John's comment "editorial only" should get round the problem.

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23 minutes ago, Sally said:

I was at the Valley of the Kings at Luxor a few weeks ago. There are signs everywhere stating that absolutely no photos are allowed, and that fines will be imposed or the camera confiscated. So I left my camera in our minibus. Only to get really annoyed by many of the other tourists blatantly taking photos with their phones, or small cameras, even using selfie sticks. There were police armed with guns, but they ignored the behaviour. 

 

This is why a Sony RX100 is on my wish list. Best to look like a happy snapper in a lot of places these days.

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1 hour ago, imageplotter said:

....so my lovely Positano landlord (fab hilltop flat with huge terrace overlooking the sea and Positano/coast, and its own lemon tree!) will miss out and I'll go elsewhere instead.

 

Sounds far too good to miss out on -  couple of bottles of chianti and the stupid regulations will be a distant memory anyhow ...

:)

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1 hour ago, Robert M Estall said:

Are you not a journalist? It covers a lot! Just leave the tripod behind

I get the sentiment.

 

But I am not a journalist.  I'd like to think I'm a photographer.

I also love my tripod (monopod in a pinch).  Even if I was a photographer/journalist, that doesn't mean I can't use a tripod.

I'm not going to sneak around hoping nobody will notice my soul sucking SLR camera.

I would bring and use the tripod.  If asked by police to stop I would (but I doubt that would ever happen).

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1 hour ago, John Mitchell said:

Technically speaking, editorial photography isn't commercial photography. Can't all images taken in places like Positano just be marked as "editorial only"?

 

Sounds like the proverbial tax grab to me. Don't see how policies like this can be enforced with general, walk-around photography.

I think to most non-photographers, commercial means 'professional' - for money, not as a hobby. And if translated from Italian, it almost certainly does. 

 

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1 hour ago, digi2ap said:

Perhaps this permit is aimed at the wedding photography market?   

 

 That is a valid point, there are quite a few togs shooting bride and groom pics on the beach in Positano. Although this would hit local businesses, these are local Italian photographers - can't think this is what the local authorities would want. 

 

Anyway, it's Italy, so this year's tax will be next year's old news and it will probably never be enforced anyway. If in doubt, it can all be discussed over a glass of the above mentioned Chianti with the local police representative. Who is likely to be the landlord's second cousin and anyhoo... salute!

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24 minutes ago, Phil Robinson said:

I think to most non-photographers, commercial means 'professional' - for money, not as a hobby. And if translated from Italian, it almost certainly does. 

 

 

Yes, that's true. Most people don't understand the difference between editorial and commercial, and most institutions (museums, galleries, gardens, etc.) don't seem to differentiate between the two.

 

I've even given up trying to explain "stock photography" to people that I meet. Actually,  I'm not sure what "stock" is myself any longer. Never really liked the term much.

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1 hour ago, Brasilnut said:

 

Cinque Terre is amazing as well.

 

painter-at-vernazzo-in-cinque-terre-italy-HPHEY7.jpg

 

Very nice image. It does look like a remarkable place, a colourful human anthill of sorts.

 

Not sure I'd want to be there during an earthquake, though.

 

I wonder how much tax the artist had to pay. B)

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3 hours ago, Brasilnut said:

 

Cinque Terre is amazing as well.

 

painter-at-vernazzo-in-cinque-terre-italy-HPHEY7.jpg

I've just been watching Boxtrolls (in French - stuck in a hotel in Paris, not much else on) and I think it was filmed there!

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I've just been watching Boxtrolls (in French - stuck in a hotel in Paris, not much else on) and I think it was filmed there!

 

There's 5 different cities along about 15-20km of coastline, hence Cinque Terre (meaning 5 lands).

 

The one above is Manarola.

 

http://www.cinqueterre.eu.com/en/the-five-towns

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I consider it in two parts:

 

1. Taking the photo

2. Selling the photo

 

The first is getting increasingly difficult to enforce, unless there is a blanket ban on any photography whatsoever. Have you seen all those smart phones at concerts where photography is prohibited? Just don't turn up with a 'professional' camera and draw attention (unless you are good at blagging)

 

On the second, in my view it comes down to whether there is some law in place (Royal Parks, Trafalgar Square etc) or whether you have entered into a contract on entry to the venue (National Trust, most sporting venues, most concerts). 

 

I think, as photographers, we need to be prepared to defend our rights to take and sell photos, and ask the question "what specifically allows you to prevent me from doing that?"

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Madonna mia! They should be paying people for braving the Amalfi Drive!  :unsure:

 

Edo

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9 hours ago, Keith Douglas said:

I consider it in two parts:

 

1. Taking the photo

2. Selling the photo

 

The first is getting increasingly difficult to enforce, unless there is a blanket ban on any photography whatsoever. Have you seen all those smart phones at concerts where photography is prohibited? Just don't turn up with a 'professional' camera and draw attention (unless you are good at blagging)

 

On the second, in my view it comes down to whether there is some law in place (Royal Parks, Trafalgar Square etc) or whether you have entered into a contract on entry to the venue (National Trust, most sporting venues, most concerts). 

 

I think, as photographers, we need to be prepared to defend our rights to take and sell photos, and ask the question "what specifically allows you to prevent me from doing that?"

 

Slightly off topic but related - I see there are many images on Alamy of the Royal Parks.  Did all these photographers of stock images really have permits?

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22 hours ago, TeeCee said:

Sounds far too good to miss out on -  couple of bottles of chianti and the stupid regulations will be a distant memory anyhow ...

:)

 

mmm...you never been there right?

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For all the people here mentioning Chianti, that's a Tuscany wine not Amalfi coast wine :P

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21 hours ago, imageplotter said:

 

 That is a valid point, there are quite a few togs shooting bride and groom pics on the beach in Positano. Although this would hit local businesses, these are local Italian photographers - can't think this is what the local authorities would want. 

 

Anyway, it's Italy, so this year's tax will be next year's old news and it will probably never be enforced anyway. If in doubt, it can all be discussed over a glass of the above mentioned Chianti with the local police representative. Who is likely to be the landlord's second cousin and anyhoo... salute!

 

Sounds a bit offensive isn't it?

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49 minutes ago, KODAKovic said:

 

mmm...you never been there right?

Couple of bottles of chianti and my own name is a distant memory.

 

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