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Was trying to bring the thread back into its original purpose.

 

Stop being a party-pooper, Alamy!

 

Anybody have any constructive stress stories to share on making it in this game? Any moments they thought about giving up...what made you not give up?

 

In my case I didn't give up because I could see my images were being viewed and zoomed so at least someone was showing interest. Sounds silly I know. 

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QUOTE   " Mind you, I would also have advised looking at those contributors who show little or no sales over an extended period of time (years not months).  Are they worth their storage space and other overhead costs?  But that's another story. "

 

There is surely a good case for deleting accounts of people with no sales after two years of uploading images to Alamy servers.   They are obviously not good stock photographers. I am not saying they are not enthusiastic or capable of  creating a technically correct image....... they are not producing content that is of interest to buyers and after two years of being given the free opportunity  should be removed.

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55 minutes ago, Brasilnut said:

Was trying to bring the thread back into its original purpose.

 

Stop being a party-pooper, Alamy!

 

Anybody have any constructive stress stories to share on making it in this game? Any moments they thought about giving up...what made you not give up?

 

In my case I didn't give up because I could see my images were being viewed and zoomed so at least someone was showing interest. Sounds silly I know. 

 

The encouragement given by images being viewed and zoomed is palpable, especially when sales are few and far between.  I sell video in another place where views are not logged in any way and it is so frustrating to not have any inkling on whether what I have uploaded there is attracting any interest or not.

 

The downside it that when views and zooms (here at Alamy) fall as  well as sales, it becomes rather dispiriting.

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The encouragement given by images being viewed and zoomed is palpable, especially when sales are few and far between.  I sell video in another place where views are not logged in any way and it is so frustrating to not have any inkling on whether what I have uploaded there is attracting any interest or not.

 

The downside it that when views and zooms (here at Alamy) fall as  well as sales, it becomes rather dispiriting.

 

When all hope was (almost) lost, expectations were so low that a zoom felt like a large sale at the time.  

 

Imagine going through a desert for days and finally seeing an oasis in the horizon, except most of the time it's a mirage.  

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15 hours ago, Travelshots said:

QUOTE   " Mind you, I would also have advised looking at those contributors who show little or no sales over an extended period of time (years not months).  Are they worth their storage space and other overhead costs?  But that's another story. "

 

There is surely a good case for deleting accounts of people with no sales after two years of uploading images to Alamy servers.   They are obviously not good stock photographers. I am not saying they are not enthusiastic or capable of  creating a technically correct image....... they are not producing content that is of interest to buyers and after two years of being given the free opportunity  should be removed.

OTOH, most of what I have selling currently was uploaded more than two years ago.

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6 hours ago, Cryptoprocta said:

OTOH, most of what I have selling currently was uploaded more than two years ago.

Some photographers entering the business don't have a good grasp of what makes a good stock image. I didn't, in spite of reading books and doing whatever studying I could on the subject before joining. What I was reading was more technical (photography end) or business end, (SELLING YOUR PHOTOS) but not what kind of photos were needed.

As a result, a lot of images I submitted were inappropriate. It was a learning process, and back then, the forum was pretty hostile, so I was afraid of asking questions. It was a slow realization over time for me.

I dont believe tossing someone who hasn't sold in two years is the answer. We have a few people recently emerging on the forum who joined, uploaded a handful of images then went dormant for years for whatever reason. They are back now, and getting serious. And we active ones on the forum are giving of time and suggestions.

Blanket solutions don't fit all. Although, I'm sure, it would fit some.

I guess what I'm saying is don't throw the baby out with the bath water.

Betty

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59 minutes ago, Betty LaRue said:

Some photographers entering the business don't have a good grasp of what makes a good stock image. I didn't, in spite of reading books and doing whatever studying I could on the subject before joining. What I was reading was more technical (photography end) or business end, (SELLING YOUR PHOTOS) but not what kind of photos were needed.

As a result, a lot of images I submitted were inappropriate. It was a learning process, and back then, the forum was pretty hostile, so I was afraid of asking questions. It was a slow realization over time for me.

I dont believe tossing someone who hasn't sold in two years is the answer. We have a few people recently emerging on the forum who joined, uploaded a handful of images then went dormant for years for whatever reason. They are back now, and getting serious. And we active ones on the forum are giving of time and suggestions.

Blanket solutions don't fit all. Although, I'm sure, it would fit some.

I guess what I'm saying is don't throw the baby out with the bath water.

Betty

I agree that a lot of the resources out there seem to talk more about learning how to take photos, or how to run the business side.  It can be more difficult learning exactly how to hone your skills towards either shooting stock in general, or more specifically I am still trying to figure out how to take more editorial pictures as that seems to be what is suggested for Alamy.

 

If you are just trying to make some money on the side it is easy to just assume that you can just upload whatever you have on your hard drive that is high quality and not have stock specifically in mind when you go out to shoot.

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