Jump to content

Recommended Posts

Hi Community ... I am trying to find a photo editing software that is easy to use, produces high quality images, and does not require a monthly user fee (like the newest versions of Photoshop & Lightbox). I know Adobe Photoshop and Lightbox are the industry standard and produce exceptional results, I find them difficult and timely to use, and I do not always get the results I want. I like how easy Microsoft Photo Editor works, even though it is limited, but it compacts the image too much. I am also using an older version of Lightbox 5.7.1 64 bit, but it no longer imports RAW files for newer camera models and I am using a Canon T6s and the new Canon D5 Mark IV. I am very reluctant to buy the online version of Photoshop because I don't believe the $10 a month fee will stay that low for long and once enough people are purchasing the online version the cost will go up significantly.

 

So, here is my discussion topic. What stand-alone software would you recommend for post production, that produces high quality images, does not compact the file size too much, and is easy to use (like MIcrosoft Photo Editor or Google Picasa)? I also would like to find a software that allows me to import one image at a time, instead of batching photos; and preserves the original image without overwriting edits. It would be nice if it also imported Canon RAW files for editing (right now I import in Canon's Digital Photo Professional, then edit in either Lightbox or for non-stock images Microsoft Photo Editor). 

 

Let the discussion begin ... Thanks.

Kristi Kisler

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My first investment when I took the decision to start submitting to Alamy was a standalone copy of Lightroom.  I'd previously used DPP but, while it's good for image processing, it was useless for keywording and captioning (things may have changed - I haven't looked at it recently).  As Phillippe has said, you have to make investments to compete in a professional marketplace - and that includes investment in your workflow to speed processing and, hopefully, provide consistent quality of output.  I don't regret my decision, nor do I regret moving to the subscription model.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, BJScrapper said:

I am also using an older version of Lightbox 5.7.1 64 bit, but it no longer imports RAW files for newer camera models and I am using a Canon T6s and the new Canon D5 Mark IV. I am very reluctant to buy the online version of Photoshop because I don't believe the $10 a month fee will stay that low for long and once enough people are purchasing the online version the cost will go up significantly.

 

Kristi Kisler

If you're looking for a budget, no subscription option, try this.

 

If you download the free Adobe DNG converter for here (Windows) or here (Mac) you can batch convert the RAW files from your new cameras into DNG format. This is still a "RAW" format (so no information is lost) and is compatible with LR 5.7.

 

Once you've done your basic processing in LR and exported as TIFF/PSD then, if you want to do pixel based edits I recommend Photoshop Elements 7 or 8 which can be picked up for £10-£15 on eBay. If you don't want to use LR then you can open the DNG in Photoshop Elements and do your raw conversion there (but if you do this you will miss out on some of the excellent features of LR raw processing - e.g. automatic chromatic aberration removal - essential IMHO).

Edited by M.Chapman

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I think OP says he can import to LR5 via DPP.

Otherwise +1

I rarely use anything expect LR5. No need to buy CC unless your DPP-LR workflow is very complicated.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You can still purchase the standalone version of Lightroom. Amazon offers the full version of Lightroom 6 or you can buy the upgrade directly from Adobe.

 

To purchase either the full version or an upgrade of Lightroom from Adobe login to your Adobe account. Go the the Catalog Page at https://www.adobe.com/products/catalog.html?types=pf_252Fdesktop&types=pf_252Fmobile&types=pf_252Fweb&page=11 Scroll through the list of products until you see Photoshop Lightroom 6. Click on the Buy button and use the pull down menu to choose which version you wish to purchase. The full version is $149 (US) and the upgrade is $79 (US) 

 

 

Edited by fotoDogue

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, BJScrapper said:

Hi Community ... I am trying to find a photo editing software that is easy to use, produces high quality images, and does not require a monthly user fee (like the newest versions of Photoshop & Lightbox). I know Adobe Photoshop and Lightbox are the industry standard and produce exceptional results, I find them difficult and timely to use, and I do not always get the results I want. I like how easy Microsoft Photo Editor works, even though it is limited, but it compacts the image too much. I am also using an older version of Lightbox 5.7.1 64 bit, but it no longer imports RAW files for newer camera models and I am using a Canon T6s and the new Canon D5 Mark IV. I am very reluctant to buy the online version of Photoshop because I don't believe the $10 a month fee will stay that low for long and once enough people are purchasing the online version the cost will go up significantly.

 

So, here is my discussion topic. What stand-alone software would you recommend for post production, that produces high quality images, does not compact the file size too much, and is easy to use (like MIcrosoft Photo Editor or Google Picasa)? I also would like to find a software that allows me to import one image at a time, instead of batching photos; and preserves the original image without overwriting edits. It would be nice if it also imported Canon RAW files for editing (right now I import in Canon's Digital Photo Professional, then edit in either Lightbox or for non-stock images Microsoft Photo Editor). 

 

Let the discussion begin ... Thanks.

Kristi Kisler

 

 

You have purchased a very expensive professional quality >30 MP camera and you want to process the images using very basic software intended for non-photographers. I would advise you to learn how to process your images with software that is fit for purpose and does your camera justice. As I said in a previous thread and others have said here, post-processing is as important as camera capture.

 

You could stay with Lightroom 5.7.1 but you are missing a number of the new features and updates in LR6 or LR CC, not least amonhg which are some very significant speed enhancements that would greatly benefit you when processing the large raw files produced by your new 5D MK IV. There are a number of other features in LR6 and extra ones in the CC version.

 

The fear of a signifiant rise in the cost of the the Adobe subscription is probably unfounded. There has been no signficant price rise since Adobe introduced the subscription model and in fact they reduced the price quite dramatically for the photography package a few years ago. There was a 20% price rise for those of us resident in the UK in 2017 but that is directly due to the fall of the £ against the $ after the Brexit referendum last year.

 

If you are serious about learning photography and I'm guessing you are if you spend that much on a camera, then I would recommend either upgrading to LR6 or better going for the subscription model and learning how to use Photoshop as well. You don't need to do this all at once but it will be well worth it and you will realise the benefits as you progress. Using older versions of Photoshop  Elements (if these cheap online copies are even legal) as somebody suggested is likely to be very frustrating as they will be out of sync with the latest LR and will be a lot slower as they will be 32-bit versions. There are other professional raw processors but nothing with the level of integration between LR and PS.

 

And finally do make sure that when you buy lenses that they are professional quality that will do your camera justice as well.

 

 

 

Edited by MDM
  • Upvote 4

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

To me PP is just as important as taking the image.  CC gives so many options unavailable in the standalone versions of PS or LR.  I use ACR, not LR for PP.  They are the same, except ACR is strictly an editor where LR has all the cataloging features.  Moving sliders can't be easier.  And as I have stated many times, I don't think I could live without my Adjustment Brush.  It saves all that masking you would need to do in PS and does a cleaner job cause you can adjust the feathering on your selections.

 

Jill

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Whilst I agree with everything that's been said about professional software for a professional purpose, if the OP is suffering a temporary cashflow problem after their recent purchase, it might be worth looking at Faststone Image Viewer. It handles .cr2 file from my 7DII (don't know about the 5D1V) and has reasonable editing functions.

 

Worth a try while you're saving up to buy proper tools.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Kristi,

Get Lightroom. It's standalone and relatively cheap. Quality is guaranteed. Easy to use, just watch a couple of YouTube videos. If you find it's not sufficient for editing a picture, then you should just scrap the photo anyway if it needs that much working on. Too much time editing photos in e.g. full Photoshop means you'll never get enough uploaded.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, Steve F said:

Hi Kristi,

Get Lightroom. It's standalone and relatively cheap. Quality is guaranteed. Easy to use, just watch a couple of YouTube videos. If you find it's not sufficient for editing a picture, then you should just scrap the photo anyway if it needs that much working on. Too much time editing photos in e.g. full Photoshop means you'll never get enough uploaded.

OP already has LR5. It just won't deal with her RAWs directly, which is why she can go via DPP.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've bought and have all the software editing programs I need in place: PS CS5, LR5.7, and Capture NX2. I also have Affinity Photo, but feel that was a mistake.

 

If, like our OP, I was starting out today, I would go for the monthly $10 fee for all the latest Adobe programs. I don't see that as an investment of any serious, over $100 amount. I see it as a $10 a month commitment to stay in the stock game with the best up-to-date software.   

 

Good luck.

  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Russell said:

Whilst I agree with everything that's been said about professional software for a professional purpose, if the OP is suffering a temporary cashflow problem after their recent purchase, it might be worth looking at Faststone Image Viewer. It handles .cr2 file from my 7DII (don't know about the 5D1V) and has reasonable editing functions.

 

Worth a try while you're saving up to buy proper tools.

 

She only needs $10 or so. Eventually everybody who is serious about photography is going to have to bite the subscription bullet. Adobe has a monopoly because they produce a superb software package. While there are competitors in the raw converter market and possibly the DAM market as well, there is currently nothing that I am aware of that does both and that is not even taking Photoshop into consideration.

 

Those who dismiss Photoshop maybe don't need or are not aware of its features. While I use Lightroom nowadays for a lot of things that I used to use Photoshop for, I still can't contemplate life without it. There are all sorts of things that I can only do or do well in Photoshop.

 

The £10 or $10 a month for these two amazing programs is a bargain.

 

 

Edited by MDM
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've always had lightroom and it's well worth paying the monthly fee, the price difference is no different than keeping up with the latest version from LR2 onwards every couple of years really. Plus as others have said, you've spend a load of money on cameras, I presume you have good expensive lenses, I don't see the point in not being able to edit your photos & keyword them properly?

 

It's a bit like trying to sell photos to media & newspapers in the 1980's & expecting Max Spielman, or any cheap "family" style lab to print you're 6x4's and expect them to buy them

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 7/3/2017 at 01:25, BJScrapper said:

So, here is my discussion topic. What stand-alone software would you recommend for post production, that produces high quality images, does not compact the file size too much, and is easy to use (like MIcrosoft Photo Editor or Google Picasa)?

 

 

Kristi:

I would suggest you begin your search with the Well-Known Corel Paint Shop Pro. It's a budget alternative to Photoshop that works for many. It's also worth exploring niche software packages like Breeze Browser. A quick search turned up more than a dozen alternatives. Each can be checked with a trial download.

 

If you are using Linux, I would suggest Darktable rather than Gimp as a starting point. But there are several other Linux packages that do an amazing job with specific tasks.

 

Oh ... and me? I use Capture 1, a superb editing package, but not so easy to use. There are so many choices!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.