Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
DJ72

Taken with Canon G9x, and received "soft or lacking definition"

Recommended Posts

 

 

 

 

Mmm... they look really nice units. But a note of caution.

 

The first one appears to have a non-uk mains lead, suggesting it may have been a grey import. It's easy to get a UK lead or adaptor, but it could give problems with service in UK if needed?

 

The second one is from a seller with 0 feedback rating.

You know your way around eBay, Mark. I don't. I'm the peach just ripe for picking...or scamming.

Remind me if I'm ever interested in buying something, to run it by you.

On another note. I have a few items I've thought about selling on eBay. I'm very honest and reputable, but I also would have 0 feedback. ;) So those 0-ers aren't all crooks. Separating the wheat from the chaff is the problem.

Betty

 

 

Yes we all started with a feedback score of 0.

Whenever I buy something from a "newbie" on eBay I always email a question or two to them, to see what type of response I get, before bidding. Buying from a newbie is more risky, but often gets the best deal as others are wary of bidding too.

I also use Hammersnipe to automatically bid for me in the last few seconds. This also allows me to bid for items that finish at "unfriendly" times (e.g. during working hours, or in the early hours of the morning) when bidding competition is less. 

 

 

Buying from a newbie on ebay is no longer risky.  If you start new, ebay puts a hold on your funds until you have a feedback of 10 I think.  They only release the funds when 14 days has passed since shipment or when the buyer leaves feedback.

 

Jill

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

 

 

 

Mmm... they look really nice units. But a note of caution.

 

The first one appears to have a non-uk mains lead, suggesting it may have been a grey import. It's easy to get a UK lead or adaptor, but it could give problems with service in UK if needed?

 

The second one is from a seller with 0 feedback rating.

You know your way around eBay, Mark. I don't. I'm the peach just ripe for picking...or scamming.

Remind me if I'm ever interested in buying something, to run it by you.

On another note. I have a few items I've thought about selling on eBay. I'm very honest and reputable, but I also would have 0 feedback. ;) So those 0-ers aren't all crooks. Separating the wheat from the chaff is the problem.

Betty

 

Yes we all started with a feedback score of 0.

Whenever I buy something from a "newbie" on eBay I always email a question or two to them, to see what type of response I get, before bidding. Buying from a newbie is more risky, but often gets the best deal as others are wary of bidding too.

I also use Hammersnipe to automatically bid for me in the last few seconds. This also allows me to bid for items that finish at "unfriendly" times (e.g. during working hours, or in the early hours of the morning) when bidding competition is less.

 

Buying from a newbie on ebay is no longer risky.  If you start new, ebay puts a hold on your funds until you have a feedback of 10 I think.  They only release the funds when 14 days has passed since shipment or when the buyer leaves feedback.

 

Jill

Good to know, Jill. Thank you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

Mmm... they look really nice units. But a note of caution.

 

The first one appears to have a non-uk mains lead, suggesting it may have been a grey import. It's easy to get a UK lead or adaptor, but it could give problems with service in UK if needed?

 

The second one is from a seller with 0 feedback rating.

 

No, it's a UK plug with a plastic pin cover on it. In any case, my last Sony had been bought by a Pole who had moved to England so there are perfectly good reasons for having different connectors- at least it now means I have a European charger lead which stays in my suitcase! Changing the menu from Polish was interesting though.

I buy almost everything non-edible on ebay and have been doing for years. Perhaps the UK has better seller protection but I've never had a problem, buying or selling. That's not to say I haven't had to return items but replacements and refunds have always been straightforward. Sellers don't want to lose their high ranking with poor service. They know their responsibilities and live up to them. If anything private sellers are better. We all had a zero feedback once.

Quite simply , ebay is where you buy nowadays for some niche interests- film and 3-speed bicycles, for example. There's nowhere else

Edited by spacecadet

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

 

Mmm... they look really nice units. But a note of caution.

 

The first one appears to have a non-uk mains lead, suggesting it may have been a grey import. It's easy to get a UK lead or adaptor, but it could give problems with service in UK if needed?

 

The second one is from a seller with 0 feedback rating.

 

No, it's a UK plug with a plastic pin cover on it. In any case, my last Sony had been bought by a Pole who had moved to England so there are perfectly good reasons for having different connectors- at least it now means I have a European charger lead which stays in my suitcase! Changing the menu from Polish was interesting though.

I buy almost everything non-edible on ebay and have been doing for years. Perhaps the UK has better seller protection but I've never had a problem, buying or selling. That's not to say I haven't had to return items but replacements and refunds have always been straightforward. Sellers don't want to lose their high ranking with poor service. They know their responsibilities and live up to them. If anything private sellers are better. We all had a zero feedback once.

Quite simply , ebay is where you buy nowadays for some niche interests- film and 3-speed bicycles, for example. There's nowhere else

 

 

Agreed, I love eBay. Although I've never lost my money, I have had purchases go "wrong".

 

Place winning bid, paid via Paypal, then hear absolutely nothing back and no goods received. Got refund via PayPal. (Seller probably not happy with price achieved).

Place winning bid, goods received, but not as described (seller was not as honest as they should have been).

Place winning bid, goods received, but inadequately packed, so some damage in transit.

Place winning bid, delivery very slow. Turned out goods and seller was not in UK, in spite of having UK eBay address.

 

Although I always got my money back, such problems are time consuming and frustrating. Fortunately they seem to be rare. 

 

To help avoid such frustrations, I prefer to check out the seller first, particularly if they have a rating of 0. I like to read the feedback on Sellers. Those with {genuine) high ratings tend to know what they are doing (accurate descriptions, well packed etc.)

 

That mains connector doesn't look like the one that came with my UK Sony RX100. Strange.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Zoom in. It's our round plug top with a white cover on it. It does look odd, ours usually have the cord at right angles to the pins, not parallel.

Edited by spacecadet

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for that link Betty. I have alerts set up from ebay for the RX100 but they only arrive in the evening so I imagine this item will be on there.

Looks too good to be true. But I have put a bid on it anyway. 

 

DJ

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

FWIW I probably wouldn't have bid on the zero-feedback one. He's selling two new unused cameras. He may be exceptionally fortunate in getting unwanted gifts, or he may be a dealer pretending to be a consumer. Either way his listings are very cursory. You need to know more.

If you've already bid, fine but don't chase it too high.

The other one is too expensive already. I'd want to be paying no more than half new price for a nearly new camera.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And what's weird is that the camera is "new" but the box looks like its been bounced around in a skip. we shall see. as others have pointed out, you are well covered buying on ebay, its just the time and hassle if you get a dud

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'll be thrilled if this works out for you. Good luck. :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey Betty, just out a bid on a M3 for £280! It looks a bit beaten up, but for that money I dont mind. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hey Betty, just out a bid on a M3 for £280! It looks a bit beaten up, but for that money I dont mind. 

 

 

David rather than risking your £280 on what looks like a beaten up camera, it could be beaten up inside too, and you can manage without a ELVF, spend that sort of money on a new earlier Mk1 or Mk2 model.

 

However before parting with the hard earned I understand the G9X has a similar size sensor as the Sony so you could end up with the same situation you are in now.

 

Read my PM before going too far with this.

 

Allan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For £280 you could easily get an older generation DSLR and kit lens.  Spend a little more to get a better lens and you open up more opportunities.  I've never had a fail in 1000's of QC submissions from my only recently departed Canon 600D - and they are going for as little as £200 used.  Similar Nikon offerings are also available but I know nothing about those.  It's never been cheaper to get high quality capability if you don't have to have the latest and best.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I agree with John. If you want to really learn photography buy an entry level DSLR unless you are really tied to having something to fit in your pocket. I don't know about the Canons but the recently discontinued Nikon D3300 is still available new with 18-55 mm Nikkor zoom for £319 from Amazon or PC World and it is a really fantastic high-spec camera for the price. Cameras are delicate machines - buying something that looks damaged is borderline madness when you can get a new and optically better machine with a guarantee for nearly the same price.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the comments everyone. This thread started out with everyone banging the drum for the RX100, but now the DSLR advocates are having their say :) 

 

I am totally open to all suggestions but yes Allan, I cancelled that bid last night after seeing just how suspect the body / screen looked.

 

The thing that pulls me to the RX100 is that I really dont like having to hump stuff around in bags. I love being able to slip in and out of situations and stick the camera back in my pocket.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You really need to think about what you want to do with the camera and with your photography. If you want to learn and advance your photography, then you need a system that with interchangeable lenses and all the other things that come with a quality DSLR kit in order to get maximum control. As I pointed out above, the entry level DSLR kits (Nikon and Canon) are incredibly cheap new (even post fall of the £) and offer enormous flexibility in expanding down the line. There is a huge range of quality Nikon and Canon fit lenses available secondhand. I guess they produce these cameras cheap to get newbies into their system. I bought my son a Nikon D3300 about 18 months ago so have first hand knowledge and I can honestly say that is is an amazing camera for the price.

 

On the other hand, if you just want a point and shoot that fits in your pocket and produces images that will pass Alamy QC, then consider the Sonys as people have recommended. However, the camera you currently have (or even a decent phonr camera) will do a similar job for the point and shoot stuff even if not suitable for sale on Alamy.

 

My advice would be to have a really good think about where you want to go with photography and buy accordingly. Forget about selling until you are reasonably accomplished. The joy of learning photography will likely far outweigh the pittance you are likely to earn here.

Edited by MDM
  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks MDM, you make a convincing case for the DSLR route. I started out in my youth with the Canon T90, but had to sell it to pay my student rent. I then bought a Canon Rebel XT ten years later. That died about two years ago.

 

After reading your post I am going to take a look at the Nikon. Other than interchangeable lenses, and I suppose the flash, is there much else in the DLSR that offers more control than something like the RX100? I suppose so. Will keep reading and in the meantime refrain from hitting the Bid button on eBay for the Sony.

Cheers.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Or consider an interchangeable lens mirrorless camera with decent EVF?

 

So long as you're not doing sport/action/wildlife photography the focussing accuracy/reliability of mirrorless cameras is superb. The EVF is not as nice as a good DSLR, but the focussing accuracy and lack of vibration all help with Alamy QC. If you're trying to learn then maybe pick one with dials or rings for exposure compensation, shutter speed, aperture etc. to save getting lost in the menu system. I used to have a Canon 550D DSLR system, but ditched it for Lumix G5. Why? The G5 is smaller and lighter with more reliable focussing and I found it gave better image quality using lenses that cost less. £150-£200 will get you a decent secondhand Lumix G5 with lens.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Firstly, I would say why buy an older secondhand mirrorless camera when you can buy a brand new lightweight Nikon DSLR with very decent lens for £320?  The new Lumix cameras are way more expensive. You don't know how a 2nd hand camera has been treated and what condition the sensor is in. If you do buy secondhand, buy from a dealer like Wex as Phil mentioned way back in the thread. The only advantage of mirrorless over DSLR really is weight and size but for new kit they are significantly more expensive and they may not be that much smaller than an entry level DSLR.

 

If you go with Nikon, if you do decide to expand, then you have a huge range of new and 2nd hand lenses available, both Nikkor and 3rd party, as well as a vast range of compatible accessories (flashguns, filters and so on) because it is such a mature system. The Nikon DX sensors are larger than the lower end compact system sensors and the Nikon sensors get excellent ratings in test results - check out DxO. The Nikon D3400 (upgrade to the D3300) sensor gets almost the same rating as Canon's 50MP 5DS which is really amazing.

 

These tests are meaningful and well worth reading up before buying. Dynamic range is where Nikon really comes into its own in comparison to similar specs cameras by Canon. Dynamic range is so important and those little Sony RX100s are way down in comparison to the entry level Nikons, not surprisingly as dynamic range is closely related to sensor size all else being equal.

 

But again it all depends on what you want from your photography. If you want to really keep your options wide open, then I do advise an entry level DSLR alongside your existing Canon or a smartphone for snapping.

 

EDIT: Just to add. I'm sure the RX100s are amazing cameras and I wouldn't mind having one sometime. They are amazingly tiny and very suitable for good quality street photography and other situations where one wants a camera that fits in a pocket. But I don't think they are the right camera for somebody wanting to get seriously into photography if that is going to be their only camera.

Edited by MDM

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Firstly, I would say why buy an older secondhand mirrorless camera when you can buy a brand new lightweight Nikon DSLR with very decent lens for £320? The new Lumix cameras are way more expensive. You don't know how a 2nd hand camera has been treated and what condition the sensor is in. If you do buy secondhand, buy from a dealer like Wex as Phil mentioned way back in the thread. The only advantage of mirrorless over DSLR really is weight and size but for new kit they are significantly more expensive and they may not be that much smaller than an entry level DSLR.

 

If you go with Nikon, if you do decide to expand, then you have a huge range of new and 2nd hand lenses available, both Nikkor and 3rd party, as well as a vast range of compatible accessories (flashguns, filters and so on) because it is such a mature system. The Nikon DX sensors are larger than the lower end compact system sensors and the Nikon sensors get excellent ratings in test results - check out DxO. The Nikon D3400 (upgrade to the D3300) sensor gets almost the same rating as Canon's 50MP 5DS which is really amazing.

 

These tests are meaningful and well worth reading up before buying. Dynamic range is where Nikon really comes into its own in comparison to similar specs cameras by Canon. Dynamic range is so important and those little Sony RX100s are way down in comparison to the entry level Nikons, not surprisingly as dynamic range is closely related to sensor size all else being equal.

 

But again it all depends on what you want from your photography. If you want to really keep your options wide open, then I do advise an entry level DSLR alongside your existing Canon or a smartphone for snapping.

 

EDIT: Just to add. I'm sure the RX100s are amazing cameras and I wouldn't mind having one sometime. They are amazingly tiny and very suitable for good quality street photography and other situations where one wants a camera that fits in a pocket. But I don't think they are the right camera for somebody wanting to get seriously into photography if that is going to be their only camera.

That's an amazing result for the D3400. However, to utilise that kind of sensor performance, the lens and focussing have to be damn good. Do you know if Nikons suffer from the same focussing problems that plagued Canon DSLRs? I had a range of Canon lenses for my Canon 550D, but in combination they all had focussing problems. Some would front focus others would back focus, and the focussing was inconsistent. Not by much, but enough to make me wary of submitting some shots to Alamy. I wondered about getting the lenses calibrated to work with my particular SLR body, but that was expensive, and if I changed body, it would need doing again. I wondered about upgrading the SLR body to one with micro-focus adjust. But, when I saw how many others were having problems with Canon DSLRs and lenses, I decided to go mirrorless and eliminate the problem altogether. I've never regretted that decision. Focussing is now 100% reliable.

Edited by M.Chapman

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I had way more failures with Nikon, than now with X-T1 and now X-T2. I'm not trying to bash Nikon. I considered the brand the Cadillac of cameras when I bought my first. I stayed loyal through 6 of them, through the D800. I had nothing else to compare them with until I got the Sony RX100, then the Fujis.

 

For whatever reason, back focus, front focus, who knows, I just had more trouble getting consistently sharp images with Nikon. Failures were 99% SoLD. The rest, a missed dust spot or bit of CA.

The D7000 was the worst for SoLD. The D300 the best. Although either the 200 or 300 could have some horrible transitions from dark to light. I think it was the 200. I often had to toss images, mostly flowers. Also all of my Nikons were notorious for purple-tipped reds in flowers.

I had very good lenses, so SoLD not that. I don't believe it was technique, because I'm doing well hand holding the 24mp X-T2 and consistently getting sharp images.

I'm sold on mirrorless, but my RX100 mk3 is a great carry-along.

Betty

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Firstly, I would say why buy an older secondhand mirrorless camera when you can buy a brand new lightweight Nikon DSLR with very decent lens for £320? The new Lumix cameras are way more expensive. You don't know how a 2nd hand camera has been treated and what condition the sensor is in. If you do buy secondhand, buy from a dealer like Wex as Phil mentioned way back in the thread. The only advantage of mirrorless over DSLR really is weight and size but for new kit they are significantly more expensive and they may not be that much smaller than an entry level DSLR.

 

If you go with Nikon, if you do decide to expand, then you have a huge range of new and 2nd hand lenses available, both Nikkor and 3rd party, as well as a vast range of compatible accessories (flashguns, filters and so on) because it is such a mature system. The Nikon DX sensors are larger than the lower end compact system sensors and the Nikon sensors get excellent ratings in test results - check out DxO. The Nikon D3400 (upgrade to the D3300) sensor gets almost the same rating as Canon's 50MP 5DS which is really amazing.

 

These tests are meaningful and well worth reading up before buying. Dynamic range is where Nikon really comes into its own in comparison to similar specs cameras by Canon. Dynamic range is so important and those little Sony RX100s are way down in comparison to the entry level Nikons, not surprisingly as dynamic range is closely related to sensor size all else being equal.

 

But again it all depends on what you want from your photography. If you want to really keep your options wide open, then I do advise an entry level DSLR alongside your existing Canon or a smartphone for snapping.

 

EDIT: Just to add. I'm sure the RX100s are amazing cameras and I wouldn't mind having one sometime. They are amazingly tiny and very suitable for good quality street photography and other situations where one wants a camera that fits in a pocket. But I don't think they are the right camera for somebody wanting to get seriously into photography if that is going to be their only camera.

That's an amazing result for the D3400. However, to utilise that kind of sensor performance, the lens and focussing have to be damn good. Do you know if Nikons suffer from the same focussing problems that plagued Canon DSLRs? I had a range of Canon lenses for my Canon 550D, but in combination they all had focussing problems. Some would front focus others would back focus, and the focussing was inconsistent. Not by much, but enough to make me wary of submitting some shots to Alamy. I wondered about getting the lenses calibrated to work with my particular SLR body, but that was expensive, and if I changed body, it would need doing again. I wondered about upgrading the SLR body to one with micro-focus adjust. But, when I saw how many others were having problems with Canon DSLRs and lenses, I decided to go mirrorless and eliminate the problem altogether. I've never regretted that decision. Focussing is now 100% reliable.

 

 

I've never had a problem focusing with Nikon cameras. The only problem I ever had with autofocus was down to a rogue lens - a Tamron 70-200 that I bought new. It wouldn't autofocus (backfocusing and not able to calibrate in camera) but was fine with manual focus. I brought it back to Wex, got the equivalent Nikkor and have never looked back - eyewateringly sharp (to paraphrase David K) on my D800E. That is not to knock Tamron as I have several other Tamron lenses including the 28-70 f2.8 and the 90mm macro and they are excellent with perfect autofocus. And I am really fussy with sharpness. One qc failure in the last 7 years and that was negligence on my part. All Nikon with very good to excellent lenses I should add.

 

Oh yes - macro. The OP asked about what can DSLRs do that the RX100s can't. Well I can't talk from experience but I'm guessing the RX100s are not great at macro or putting backgrounds out of focus at wide apertures.

Edited by MDM

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

No, MDM, the RXs can no way compare with a good macro lens. If one wants the best images of bugs and flowers with creamy backgrounds, there's only one way to go.

Not everyone shoots macro, though.

Funny thing....as much time as I spent shooting with my Nikon 105 macro back when, very few of those images have sold. I've actually sold more florals taken with my non-macro Fuji camera and lenses. Go figure. Maybe buyers are wanting more depth of field, now. My 50-140 Fujinon does well. But I doubt the Sony would ever compare.

I will be (at last!) getting the new Fujinon 80mm macro before the end of the year, so I can go back to taking non-saleable images again. :D

Betty

Edited by Betty LaRue
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hello All.

 

Just to let you know that today I had my first 3 images accepted. (Yes, they were taken by the Canon G9x!)

 

I am however going to upgrade to the RX100 this month sometime and my Canon is now for sale.

 

I should mention that I got a lot of support from Mr Chapman, and without him I couldn't have really gotten anywhere near understanding the little I now know. 

 

Thanks to all - I think this closes the thread quite nicely!

DJ

  • Upvote 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you for letting us know. Some people here go to a lot of trouble to help and all too often we don't hear again from the questioner. It's nice to know you are on your way.

 

Paulette

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

DJ, I wish you luck. If you want it badly enough, you'll attain your goals.

Betty

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.