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DJ72

Taken with Canon G9x, and received "soft or lacking definition"

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Hi Jill

 

Glad you mention "whatever version" as the Mark IV is retailing for about £700.

 

Would you happen to know if any of the earlier versions departed significantly from the previous? 

 

My thinking is, of course, to get the cheapest version of the Sony.

 

(looks like the Mark II improved with its sensor and tiltable viewfinder...)

 

 

Thank you.

DJ

 

You might want to take a look at the reviews https://www.dpreview.com/reviews/2017-roundup-compact-enthusiast-zoom-cameras

 

I'm a little surprised the Canon G9x doesn't make the grade, but your images do look soft with significant diffuse glow around some edges (e.g. woman's hat in boat). This might be CA but, if so, it's the worst I've ever seen. I've seen comments that the G9x is "a bit soft" and suffers from CA, but that looks excessive.

 

There a few general tips that might help meet Alamy QC with the G9x

 

1) Shoot in RAW

2) Avoid using high ISO settings (too much noise and/or noise reduction will blur the image).

3) Avoid using too small an aperture. Although most lenses will benefit from stopping down 1-2 stops from the max aperture, going to the other extreme will cause image softening due to diffraction. F11 is likely to be well be past the Canon G9x lens's "sweet spot".

4) Check and remove any fingerprints on the lens

5) Use LR to remove CA and/or fringing, reduce noise and possibly apply a touch of sharpening (don't overdo it - must avoid causing halos on edges and excessive noise in shadows)

6) Downsize the final image to 6 megapixels.

 

If that still doesn't work, sell the G9x  and get a Sony RX100! It will make life much easier. I just bought an RX100 Mk3 and am staggered how good it is for such a small camera.

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Wow thanks a lot for that Mark, excellent points.

The lady on the canal boat - that was shot while moving, set on AUTO and not in raw. So I wasnt expecting much and have learned to never do that again (shoot in jpeg only).

 

But there are others I have taken with raw, and I have saved them here if you have the time to take a look:

https://www.viewbug.com/photo/72626679

https://www.viewbug.com/photo/72626719

https://www.viewbug.com/photo/72626746

 

 

But these dont seem to make the grade either. Perhaps, as you say, it was me taking the F stops all out to F11. Perhaps that is too much for the G9x? 

 

Thank you

David,

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Using F11 on auto means your camera is going to have to compensate with lower shutter speed and/or higher ISO.  Your shutter speed should never be lower than your focal length and if moving, well, its unlikely you will have a sharp image, not at F11.

 

Jill

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Thanks Jill, great tip and much appreciated.

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Hi David,

 

I took a look at a couple of your pictures.

 

One of the problems with this one https://www.viewbug.com/photo/72626679 is that the autofocus appears to have chosen the item that is nearest to the camera (the fisherman's elbow), so the fisherman's head is out of focus.

 

When I use a Canon G15 I have it set to use a fixed centre spot focus, I then aim it at the exact point I want in focus, half press the shutter and then recompose, before taking the shot. I found I couldn't trust the flexi-zone autofocus on the G15, it often simply picked whatever was closest to the camera.

 

Looking at this one https://www.viewbug.com/photo/72626719  it's pretty soft all over with lots of edge artefacts. I'm not sure what's going on and suspect there's something wrong with your workflow. You say they were taken in RAW. How did you produce the image that you have uploaded?. If you can open the RAW image in Lightroom (or DXO) using the default settings for the G9X, and then simply export to max quality jpg resized to 3400 on the long side, I'd hope for a much better result than that.

 

Mark

 

PS. I've sent you a PM

Edited by M.Chapman

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Hi All.

 

It seems that all of my pictures taken in raw were set to ISO 800. I have learned my lesson.

 

I will try a few more with the intrepid G9x, with careful attention to setting the aperture to a wider setting and ensuring that the ISO doesnt creep up.

 

Thank you to all for your help and advice.

 

DJ

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800 is going to be more of a problem for the small sensor. Most APS-C sensors are fine without NR up to at least 1600- I apply some anyway on a preset but it's not usually necessary.

If you didn't apply any NR that might have contributed to the overall softness a bit.

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J28DTC.jpg

Mark, this and most of my at-home tabletop is shot at ISO800. They dance right through QC. This was snapped with a Sony RX10, but I do the same with my RX100/3.

 

DJ, I agree with Betty that you have a good eye, but you're still just a camera owner, not a photographer. Everything in the Canon G series, by the way, has been spotty in performance. Some contributors have done okay with them, but they are not forgiving machines.

 

A good eye gets you into the building, but not very far down the hall. You may be able to become a photographer, but frankly you may not have the time or make the effort to hang in there long enough. If you think you'll put a toe in the pond and make some money . . . forget it.  

 

Whatever you decide to do, the best of luck to you. 

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I believe composition, in other words, an artistic bent toward knowing how to frame a scene, gives you a leg up in photography. There are a few people who make technically perfect images but they are boring images.

But Ed is right. That gets a toe in the door, but you must have a burning desire to be the best you can be. That includes studying the craft, understanding how aperture, shutter speeds, ISO affect image-making. After awhile, when you've done it enough, you just know when to do what, when.

 

Equipment is an important, necessary part of the whole thing. That doesn't mean you have to have the best and most expensive DSLR. People here have suggested options for you. The first thing I would do is get the most money you can get out of your G9x. Have that money put aside and add to it if/when you can. Having it on hand ready to spend on a different camera is important.

 

Look around for one of the options suggested here, buy used. While you wait for a decent deal, (be patient), keep studying photography. Library books, online, there's a lot of information out there.

 

If this is all more than you want to pursue, and you want instant gratification, then I suggest stock photography just isn't for you.

Every well-built house needs a good foundation.

Betty

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DJ, your images strike me as being focused on nothing in particular, which probably means they're focused on whatever the autofocus selected, like somewhere on the dragon's body, or somewhere on the water in the middle distance in your shot of a boat prow with a beach in the background. Your compositions are good, but to succeed in stock photography, one of the things you must do is get the primary focus on the right point.

 

Mark has told you the primary method for getting a camera to focus where you want. I see also that the G9X has a touch screen that lets you select the focus point (presuming that one of the 31 focus points is where you want to focus). Figure out how to get it into the touch-focus mode, and give it a try with that.

Edited by Bill Kuta

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FYI I have the original version of the Sony rx100 and have many photos here on alamy that have been shot with it.  It's my take-with-me-everywhere camera when I'm not hauling my Nikon gear around. 

 

Maria

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Bill, Betty, Ed and Maria - thank you.

I am not seeking to make any real money , I just wanted to start learning the craft.

 

Yes, Mark C has been really really helpful in giving me the basics in terms of focus, aperture and ISO. I think as Bill reiterated, the focus on those otherwise pretty good shots really lets them down. Huge lessons learned! Its amazing how, after reading the comments in this thread, I am seeing my own photos in a different way. 

 

Yes, I have my eye on the RX100 III, will most likely be second hand.

 

Does anyone (in the UK) know of a decent online resource to find second hand cameras? There are no camera shop near me and I am checking ebay but maybe there is  a site out there that might help?

 

Thank again,

DJ.

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Bill, Betty, Ed and Maria - thank you.

I am not seeking to make any real money , I just wanted to start learning the craft.

 

Yes, Mark C has been really really helpful in giving me the basics in terms of focus, aperture and ISO. I think as Bill reiterated, the focus on those otherwise pretty good shots really lets them down. Huge lessons learned! Its amazing how, after reading the comments in this thread, I am seeing my own photos in a different way. 

 

Yes, I have my eye on the RX100 III, will most likely be second hand.

 

Does anyone (in the UK) know of a decent online resource to find second hand cameras? There are no camera shop near me and I am checking ebay but maybe there is  a site out there that might help?

 

Thank again,

DJ.

Try https://www.mpb.com/en-uk/.  I've had a fair bit of Canon / Canon fit stuff from them and it's always been fine

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Thanks both, I still dont see the RX100 III for anything less than £500 new. Though there is one on Ebay today for £350 (though the description says "the multi port bung needs replacing" 

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If you're not set on mirrorless, I paid under £250 for a low shutter count used A58 with 18-55 zoom a few months ago.

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Thanks both, I still dont see the RX100 III for anything less than £500 new. Though there is one on Ebay today for £350 (though the description says "the multi port bung needs replacing" [/size]

That's what I meant by

1. Selling your G9x now

2. Being patient

3. Keep checking those sites and waiting until the perfect camera pops up.

 

Byword....Patience.

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If you sell first, you won't have a camera. If that prospect doesn't bring you out in a cold sweat, you're not a photographer yet.

My last one packed up on a Thursday and I had a replacement on the following Tuesday.

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Yes.....the G9x is my only camera so couldn't really live without it for any amount of time. I will find a way though, probably after next pay day!

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Credit card.

Second-hand is no problem really from a reputable seller, I've had 2 off ebay with no bother. One only lasted 3 years but that wasn't down to anything the seller did. Or buy from a dealer and pay his margin for the warranty.

A58s are even cheaper now, £175, if you're amenable, but check the shutter count.

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Yes.....the G9x is my only camera so couldn't really live without it for any amount of time. I will find a way though, probably after next pay day!

The idea from me was: The camera you have is unsuitable. So basically you are without a camera anyway. At least, for stock. Family snaps may be another story.

Betty

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Mmm... they look really nice units. But a note of caution.

 

The first one appears to have a non-uk mains lead, suggesting it may have been a grey import. It's easy to get a UK lead or adaptor, but it could give problems with service in UK if needed?

 

The second one is from a seller with 0 feedback rating.

Edited by M.Chapman

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Mmm... they look really nice units. But a note of caution.

 

The first one appears to have a non-uk mains lead, suggesting it may have been a grey import. It's easy to get a UK lead or adaptor, but it could give problems with service in UK if needed?

 

The second one is from a seller with 0 feedback rating.

You know your way around eBay, Mark. I don't. I'm the peach just ripe for picking...or scamming.

Remind me if I'm ever interested in buying something, to run it by you.

On another note. I have a few items I've thought about selling on eBay. I'm very honest and reputable, but I also would have 0 feedback. ;) So those 0-ers aren't all crooks. Separating the wheat from the chaff is the problem.

Betty

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Mmm... they look really nice units. But a note of caution.

 

The first one appears to have a non-uk mains lead, suggesting it may have been a grey import. It's easy to get a UK lead or adaptor, but it could give problems with service in UK if needed?

 

The second one is from a seller with 0 feedback rating.

You know your way around eBay, Mark. I don't. I'm the peach just ripe for picking...or scamming.

Remind me if I'm ever interested in buying something, to run it by you.

On another note. I have a few items I've thought about selling on eBay. I'm very honest and reputable, but I also would have 0 feedback. ;) So those 0-ers aren't all crooks. Separating the wheat from the chaff is the problem.

Betty

 

 

Yes we all started with a feedback score of 0.

Whenever I buy something from a "newbie" on eBay I always email a question or two to them, to see what type of response I get, before bidding. Buying from a newbie is more risky, but often gets the best deal as others are wary of bidding too.

I also use Hammersnipe to automatically bid for me in the last few seconds. This also allows me to bid for items that finish at "unfriendly" times (e.g. during working hours, or in the early hours of the morning) when bidding competition is less. 

Edited by M.Chapman

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