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M.Chapman

Best settings for Sony RX100 MkIII?

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Following lots of positive comments about the RX100 in this forum, I finally took the plunge and bought one earlier today to carry with me all the time.

 

I must admit the number of menus and possible settings is quite boggling at the moment. Do other RX100 owners have any advice on a good set of default settings that I should put into the MR "Memory"? Most of my shots are landscape or townscape taken in good daylight.

 

On my Micro Four Thirds camera I shoot in JPG+RAW maximum resolution, in aperture priority mode, with a default auto ISO range from ISO 160 (the lowest available) up to ISO 400 with a default aperture of f/8, with focus mode set to centre spot (focus the recompose) and exposure set to centre weighted.

 

Obviously these are just my defaults and I make tweaks according to the subject, but it makes it much quicker for me if the camera always "wakes up" in a default state I'm familiar with.

 

Raw image files will be post processed in LR6 and PSE 

 

So, my question is, bearing in mind the above and Alamy's QC requirements, do you have a recommended set of defaults for the RX100? It might save me a lot of experimentation!

 

Thanks in advance.

Edited by M.Chapman

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Video button in Video Mode only.

The rest is pretty much set to standard.

 

wim

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Factory default mainly.  

 

Set to Raw only and shoot all daylight shots in full auto and just concentrate on composition.

 

Only use 'Night Scene' for night time cityscape type of shots (it holds the ISO at 125) and still shoots in RAW.

 

John

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=I do like John. Full auto, the green one. Night scene is great. This is a great little camera. Always in my purse. You can go in a shopping mall that usually has great light and get good shots.
I took some of my sister getting an eye exam in a dim room, normal auto. I used selective noise correction on dark areas and they passed QC.
Bettya-female-ophthalomologists-assistant-reflooking-down-the-hall-of-one-wing-of-a-sred-rental-child-strollers-lined-up-in-aa-60-year-old-caucasian-man-sits-on-his-

 

this using Night Scene

 

a-full-moon-struggles-through-the-cloudsa-palapa-and-fence-leading-to-the-beach-

Edited by Betty LaRue
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You may want to set the maximum ISO to 3200 (works at least in the A and S shooting mode). Will help keeping the noise at a low level during daytime in these settings.

 

Regarding night shots I totally agree with all above on the night scene setting. However, if there is a lot of movement and the surroundings are rather well lit, I sometimes prefer automatic. Best to shoot some in both settings, I think. The night scene shots will have extremely low noise, but shutter speed rather long, may also sometimes require a railing for support or a tripod to be sure. However, the automatic will often decrease the movements of people, etc., to an acceptable level, but noise can increase too much.

Edited by Niels Quist
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Thanks to all that have responded so far. Wow, I'm impressed that you can trust the fully auto. I must admit (based on previous cameras) it makes me a bit nervous. :unsure:

 

On all my previous cameras, to get results I trusted for Alamy QC, I restricted the ISO range (to keep noise down), controlled the lens aperture (to limit corner softness fully open), and used centre spot focus (to be sure it was focussing on what I wanted in focus).

 

A number of you clearly trust the RX100 on fully Auto. Maybe I need to put my fears to one side.  :o

 

A couple more questions

 

Do you submit full size (5472 x 3648) images to Alamy or do you downsize?

Do you tend to use default LR conversion settings for NR and sharpening for shots taken in normal daylight conditions?

 

PS. So far I like the images I'm getting from the RX100 (it sure beats my Canon G15, and comes close to my Lumix G5). I notice noise creeping in above ISO 400, and the extreme corners are a bit soft at wide angle, max aperture. So I'd currently feel "safer" (with respect to Alamy QC) if I restricted the ISO and lens aperture. But I'll have to play with the Green Auto (IA) mode to see what sort of choices the camera makes, and build my confidence.

Edited by M.Chapman

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- and then again, Alamy accepts soft corners and noise to a certain degree.

 

I only downsize when I think it is necessary. It may sometimes be necessary - especially for some night shots.

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I probably downsize to 4000-4500 longest side on maybe 50% of my shots. I might could do less than that, but I'm playing it safe. I started that with the original 100, and the habit is hard for me to break with the Mk3.

 

Since shooting with mirrorless for the past 3 years and being used to the sharpness of the Fuji system, it makes me somewhat paranoid with anything else.

Betty

Edit typo

Edited by Betty LaRue
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Noise will creep in with the RX100 if you're not careful. It's a quirky camera imo. I would just experiment a lot with settings.

Edited by Gervais Montacute

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Congratulations M Chapman for having made an excellent choice for a "walk about" camera. I started with the M1 and switched to RX100M3 when the view finder and 24mm wide became available. I still use Aperture on auto and adjust the shutter through ISO settings. Have not moved on from Minolta X700 despite numerous cameras in between. Have set to Adobe RGB - always. If using ISO above 400 I often downsize to 4000 on long side to be on the safe side, but all full size images have passed without a problem. I find that noise (as luminance) can easily be removed in Camera Raw and a little extra sharpening added. I never sharpen in PS. Would not trust the green dial setting as I like to control DOF because of my type of shooting. Sharpness reduces in corners with higher ISO settings but I have had ISO 800 cleared without any problems. Due to age my kit bag now consists of RX100M3 as well as A6000 with Sony 10-18 zoom, 16-50 pancake and 55-210 zoom. Frankly I can't remember the last time I used the 16-50 because the RX100M3 takes care of that range. The A6000 has the 10-18 zoom fitted and then switches to the tele at the rare occations I need a longer length. This provides me with quality cover almost ubroken from 15 to 315mm in good old full frame speak.

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I downsize on some shots to be on the safe side. Usually 4000 on longest side.

 

If you look at my folio, they are nearly all taken on a Sony RX100 and on full auto (green) or 'Night Scene'.

 

There are a few scanned archive images in there so ignore those of course.

 

I just press the release half way to check where the focus is.

 

John

Edited by John Walker
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Interested in the comments above as I am getting a MkIII soon. As there are a few comments where "Intelligent Auto" (green) setting is used in good light I tested that setting on my MkI RX100.

 

I find that the aperture will not go to a number higher than f5.6. Is that what you are finding on the MkIII?

 

The images I took at that setting appeared quite soft at the with only the middle being anywhere near sharp.

 

I usually have the MkI set at f8 (aperture priority) to give good DoF, particularly for Macro, with ISO varying 125 through 400. With speed varying depending on light. No fails from this setting. (YET). :)

 

Tried the night scene with mixed results. Some are in my port but I deleted others before even trying to process them.

 

Allan

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I downsize on some shots to be on the safe side. Usually 4000 on longest side.

If you look at my folio, they are nearly all taken on a Sony RX100 and on full auto (green) or 'Night Scene'.

There are a few scanned archive images in there so ignore those of course.

I just press the release half way to check where the focus is.

John

You can focus precisely by framing the subject smack in the middle >> press the button in the selector wheel >> recompose (a little square will stay around your subject) >> shoot.

 

Cheers,

Philippe

 

 

Interesting Philippe I did not know that. :mellow:

 

It even works in Aperture Priority.

 

Allan

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Interested in the comments above as I am getting a MkIII soon. As there are a few comments where "Intelligent Auto" (green) setting is used in good light I tested that setting on my MkI RX100.

 

I find that the aperture will not go to a number higher than f5.6. Is that what you are finding on the MkIII?

 

The images I took at that setting appeared quite soft at the with only the middle being anywhere near sharp.

 

I usually have the MkI set at f8 (aperture priority) to give good DoF, particularly for Macro, with ISO varying 125 through 400. With speed varying depending on light. No fails from this setting. (YET). :)

 

Tried the night scene with mixed results. Some are in my port but I deleted others before even trying to process them.

 

Allan

 

On the Mk1 and 2 the lens is pretty good at the wider end. Not so much on the longer end.

DXO Field map under the Sharpness tab will tell you all. Just cycle through all apertures at every focal length. Green is good.

DXO Sony RX100 II lens test.

The lens scores a 12 on the overall DXO scale and only a 6 on their sharpness scale. That's not very good. The best lenses go to well above 40 now.

The 24-70 (equivalent) of the Mk III and onward has not been tested by DXO. Which is a pity.

 

wim

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I have a RX100 1 with the 24-105 full frame equivalent lens.

 
To echo Wim’s comment. The weak point is the lens, which I think is only marginally acceptable but acceptable none the less. I did a brick wall test to find optimum aperture but that varies with the amount of zooming. I have optimum apertures at different zooms marked on a piece of sticky tape on the camera back.
 
Sometimes the great depth of field of the small chip works for you, and sometimes against you.
 
I would have preferred to open up even more, to soften the distracting background for this shot at 105 zoom and maximum zoom aperture of F5.6. I intended to come back and reshoot on a full frame camera at F4 but never made it.
E00JN5.jpg
 
However depth of field helped here, and the small inconspicuous camera size was a big help as well.
DYE5W4.jpg
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Thanks to all those that have responded (greenies all round  :) ).

 

Now we've had some better weather I've been able to try some outdoor shots in good light, and I must confess I'm stunned at the quality that such a little camera can produce. Very happy.

 

I was lucky enough to spot an ex-demo RX100 Mk3 in John Lewis at £460, which they claimed was reduced from £579. But, when I pointed out that they were now were selling at ones £499 (new price or, Easter promotion?), they knocked another £60 off the used model. So I got a very lightly used, boxed RX100 Mk3 with 2 year warranty for £400. Well chuffed. So, if you're in John Lewis anywhere, watch out for their ex-demo stock and don't be afraid to ask for a deal.

 

I'm still erring towards using aperture priority mode with restricted ISO range at the moment, but I'm still learning what this little marvel can do.

 

The lens on the Mk 3 is excellent, only a little softening at the corners wide open, but other that that it's fine.

 

I like the EVF (it's why I chose an RX100 Mk III and expect I'll probably use that a lot of the time). But I do find the need to cup my other hand to shield my eye and the viewfinder from stray light as the pop-up finder is so small and has no eye cup.

Edited by M.Chapman
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I probably downsize to 4000-4500 longest side on maybe 50% of my shots. I might could do less than that, but I'm playing it safe. I started that with the original 100, and the habit is hard for me to break with the Mk3.

 

Since shooting with mirrorless for the past 3 years and being used to the sharpness of the Fuji system, it makes me somewhat paranoid with anything else.

Betty

Edit typo

 

 

Betty and others who downsize their Sony RX100 images. I find with the MkI that sharpening settings in LR at the following settings work fine on majority of images without need to downsize.

 

Amount     =  50

Radius      =   1.0

Detail        =  25

Masking   =  48

 

Allan

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I probably downsize to 4000-4500 longest side on maybe 50% of my shots. I might could do less than that, but I'm playing it safe. I started that with the original 100, and the habit is hard for me to break with the Mk3.

 

Since shooting with mirrorless for the past 3 years and being used to the sharpness of the Fuji system, it makes me somewhat paranoid with anything else.

Betty

Edit typo

 

 

Betty and others who downsize their Sony RX100 images. I find with the MkI that sharpening settings in LR at the following settings work fine on majority of images without need to downsize.

 

Amount     =  50

Radius      =   1.0

Detail        =  25

Masking   =  48

 

Allan

 

Interesting - What's your NR set to? The default?

 

Luminance = 0

Color = 25

Detail = 50

Smoothness = 50

 

Do you vary the settings according to the ISO?

Edited by M.Chapman

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I probably downsize to 4000-4500 longest side on maybe 50% of my shots. I might could do less than that, but I'm playing it safe. I started that with the original 100, and the habit is hard for me to break with the Mk3.

 

Since shooting with mirrorless for the past 3 years and being used to the sharpness of the Fuji system, it makes me somewhat paranoid with anything else.

Betty

Edit typo

 

 

Betty and others who downsize their Sony RX100 images. I find with the MkI that sharpening settings in LR at the following settings work fine on majority of images without need to downsize.

 

Amount     =  50

Radius      =   1.0

Detail        =  25

Masking   =  48

 

Allan

 

Interesting - What's your NR set to? The default?

 

Luminance = 0

Color = 25

Detail = 50

Smoothness = 50

 

Do you vary the settings according to the ISO?

 

 

 

Sorry for delay been elsewhere.

 

Had a look at LR to refresh my memory and the NR settings are as you have them in your post.

 

Not had to vary them yet but I do not usually go over 400 ISO.

 

Allan

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Thanks to all that have responded so far. Wow, I'm impressed that you can trust the fully auto. I must admit (based on previous cameras) it makes me a bit nervous. :unsure:

 

On all my previous cameras, to get results I trusted for Alamy QC, I restricted the ISO range (to keep noise down), controlled the lens aperture (to limit corner softness fully open), and used centre spot focus (to be sure it was focussing on what I wanted in focus).

 

A number of you clearly trust the RX100 on fully Auto. Maybe I need to put my fears to one side.  :o

 

A couple more questions

 

Do you submit full size (5472 x 3648) images to Alamy or do you downsize?

Do you tend to use default LR conversion settings for NR and sharpening for shots taken in normal daylight conditions?

 

PS. So far I like the images I'm getting from the RX100 (it sure beats my Canon G15, and comes close to my Lumix G5). I notice noise creeping in above ISO 400, and the extreme corners are a bit soft at wide angle, max aperture. So I'd currently feel "safer" (with respect to Alamy QC) if I restricted the ISO and lens aperture. But I'll have to play with the Green Auto (IA) mode to see what sort of choices the camera makes, and build my confidence.

Using the MkII, I generally downsize to 3600px on the long side

 

Alex

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I have a RX100 1 with the 24-105 full frame equivalent lens.

 
To echo Wim’s comment. The weak point is the lens, which I think is only marginally acceptable but acceptable none the less. I did a brick wall test to find optimum aperture but that varies with the amount of zooming. I have optimum apertures at different zooms marked on a piece of sticky tape on the camera back.
 
Sometimes the great depth of field of the small chip works for you, and sometimes against you.
 
I would have preferred to open up even more, to soften the distracting background for this shot at 105 zoom and maximum zoom aperture of F5.6. I intended to come back and reshoot on a full frame camera at F4 but never made it.
E00JN5.jpg
 
However depth of field helped here, and the small inconspicuous camera size was a big help as well.
DYE5W4.jpg

 

 

 

Bill, your RX100 has a 28-100 zoom.  https://www.dpreview.com/products/sony/compacts/sony_dscrx100

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I like the EVF (it's why I chose an RX100 Mk III and expect I'll probably use that a lot of the time). But I do find the need to cup my other hand to shield my eye and the viewfinder from stray light as the pop-up finder is so small and has no eye cup.

 

Did you know you can select a "sunny weather" setting for your LCD screen so it's perfectly visible in bright weather?  -_-

 

Cheers,

Philippe

 

 

No I didn't, I had assumed that the Auto (default setting) would brighten the display according to the ambient lighting, but an initial quick test indicates "Sunny weather" makes it brighter than the Auto does.

 

I wonder what it does to battery life?

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I like the EVF (it's why I chose an RX100 Mk III and expect I'll probably use that a lot of the time). But I do find the need to cup my other hand to shield my eye and the viewfinder from stray light as the pop-up finder is so small and has no eye cup.

 

Did you know you can select a "sunny weather" setting for your LCD screen so it's perfectly visible in bright weather?  -_-

 

Cheers,

Philippe

 

 

No I didn't, I had assumed that the Auto (default setting) would brighten the display according to the ambient lighting, but an initial quick test indicates "Sunny weather" makes it brighter than the Auto does.

 

I wonder what it does to battery life?

 

 

It uses more power, but I never ran into problems during a day's shooting. But make sure always to carry a spare battery. (Must confess though that I'm not a very trigger-happy-photographer. I probably shoot less in a week than most in one morning  ;))

 

Cheers,

Philippe

 

The sun just came out fully and now, standing with the sun behind me, I can't see any difference between "Auto" and "Sunny weather", they both seem equally bright. Although it's not easy to be sure.

Edited by M.Chapman

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Thanks to all those that have responded (greenies all round  :) ).

 

Now we've had some better weather I've been able to try some outdoor shots in good light, and I must confess I'm stunned at the quality that such a little camera can produce. Very happy.

 

I was lucky enough to spot an ex-demo RX100 Mk3 in John Lewis at £460, which they claimed was reduced from £579. But, when I pointed out that they were now were selling at ones £499 (new price or, Easter promotion?), they knocked another £60 off the used model. So I got a very lightly used, boxed RX100 Mk3 with 2 year warranty for £400. Well chuffed. So, if you're in John Lewis anywhere, watch out for their ex-demo stock and don't be afraid to ask for a deal.

 

I'm still erring towards using aperture priority mode with restricted ISO range at the moment, but I'm still learning what this little marvel can do.

 

The lens on the Mk 3 is excellent, only a little softening at the corners wide open, but other that that it's fine.

 

I like the EVF (it's why I chose an RX100 Mk III and expect I'll probably use that a lot of the time). But I do find the need to cup my other hand to shield my eye and the viewfinder from stray light as the pop-up finder is so small and has no eye cup.

 

 

Got my RX100 Mk III today for £499 and they threw in a 16Gb card and a screen protector too.

 

Allan

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Thanks to all those that have responded (greenies all round  :) ).

 

Now we've had some better weather I've been able to try some outdoor shots in good light, and I must confess I'm stunned at the quality that such a little camera can produce. Very happy.

 

I was lucky enough to spot an ex-demo RX100 Mk3 in John Lewis at £460, which they claimed was reduced from £579. But, when I pointed out that they were now were selling at ones £499 (new price or, Easter promotion?), they knocked another £60 off the used model. So I got a very lightly used, boxed RX100 Mk3 with 2 year warranty for £400. Well chuffed. So, if you're in John Lewis anywhere, watch out for their ex-demo stock and don't be afraid to ask for a deal.

 

I'm still erring towards using aperture priority mode with restricted ISO range at the moment, but I'm still learning what this little marvel can do.

 

The lens on the Mk 3 is excellent, only a little softening at the corners wide open, but other that that it's fine.

 

I like the EVF (it's why I chose an RX100 Mk III and expect I'll probably use that a lot of the time). But I do find the need to cup my other hand to shield my eye and the viewfinder from stray light as the pop-up finder is so small and has no eye cup.

 

 

Got my RX100 Mk III today for £499 and they threw in a 16Gb card and a screen protector too.

 

Allan

 

 

Well done, where did you get it?

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