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POLL - Lightroom or Photoshop?

Lightroom or Photoshop?  

132 members have voted

  1. 1. Which do you prefer to use when processing images?

    • Lightroom
      50
    • Photoshop
      50
    • Both equal
      23
    • Neither
      8


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Neither for me as I use Aperture, yes, really. Probably not worth a blog post about it.   ;)

Edited by digi2ap

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It wasn't me who gave you the red ticket, Mark.  :unsure:

 

I have LR 5.7 and PS CS 5. Here in NYC I have to do a lot of cleaning up the streets, and LR is not good for spotting. 

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It seems a little odd that the best way to decide what to write a blogpost about is to conduct a badly thought out survey.

 

Tossing a coin would be just as effective.

 

Personally, I like the interaction and appreciate that Alamy are trying to write about something that interests their audience.

I would rather the time used by Alamy staff for blogging and, 'cringe', Vloging was used to address the very real concerns about the new AIM which has been shown by contributors,instead of asking all individuals to email questions for a personal reply.

Beats me how individual emails can be more effective than giving answers visible to all forum members for the very common questions being asked.

On the question of them blogging about PS or LR; if we use either, I'm sure we can find tutorials easy enough if we were worried about how to use them.

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I don't use LR, but Bridge and ACR and PS.

 

...............  I know the image editing tools in LR are the same as ACR, but keywording is better in Bridge.

 

Jill

I've just started keywording using LR and hierarchical keywords - I haven't tried Bridge. In what way is Bridge better than LR?

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I don't use LR, but Bridge and ACR and PS.

 

...............  I know the image editing tools in LR are the same as ACR, but keywording is better in Bridge.

 

Jill

I've just started keywording using LR and hierarchical keywords - I haven't tried Bridge. In what way is Bridge better than LR?

 

 

LR sends your keywords to Alamy alphabetically whereas Bridge sends them in the same order you typed them in. So words you want to be next to each other will stay next to each other when you use Bridge.

 

Jill

  • Upvote 1

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Both. I've been using PhotoShop since the mid 90s but a few years ago began to explore Lightroom. Nowadays, I prefer to organize and make preliminary edits in Lightroom, then clone out dust spots and caption in PhotoShop.

I also enjoy the various plug-ins available for Lightroom, like Alamy Image Manager which allows me to track my Alamy images, as well as the PhotoShelter plug-in that allows me to upload directly to my website and see which images I have online there.

 

Right now, Lightroom is acting up and running very slowly. I'm at a bit of a loss because I've become so accustomed to using them in tandam.

Edited by fotoDogue

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I don't use LR, but Bridge and ACR and PS.

 

...............  I know the image editing tools in LR are the same as ACR, but keywording is better in Bridge.

 

Jill

 

I've just started keywording using LR and hierarchical keywords - I haven't tried Bridge. In what way is Bridge better than LR?

 

LR sends your keywords to Alamy alphabetically whereas Bridge sends them in the same order you typed them in. So words you want to be next to each other will stay next to each other when you use Bridge.

 

Jill

Thanks for the reply.

 

Paul

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Lightroom and Photoshop but not equal, lightroom great for cataloguing and quick Camera RAW to JPG conversions using profiles, but if doing image stacking or multiple image manipulation and using layers you can only use Photoshop.

  • Upvote 1

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I had to answer neither which doesn't seem too accurate because I like them both for different elements - basically for pretty much the same reasons as djmorgan. Basic processing in LR then over to Photoshop for final tweaks, anything more complex and for checking at 100%.

But always LR for keywording

Edited by Callie

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I had to answer neither which doesn't seem too accurate because I like them both for different elements - basically for pretty much the same reasons as djmorgan. Basic processing in LR then over to Photoshop for final tweaks, anything more complex and for checking at 100%.

But always LR for keywording

 

Callie,

 

My workflow is the same as yours and I answered 'both'.

 

The poll could have been worded a bit better.

 

John.

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I had to answer neither which doesn't seem too accurate because I like them both for different elements - basically for pretty much the same reasons as djmorgan. Basic processing in LR then over to Photoshop for final tweaks, anything more complex and for checking at 100%.

But always LR for keywording

 

Callie,

 

My workflow is the same as yours and I answered 'both'.

 

The poll could have been worded a bit better.

 

John.

 

 

True - if it just said 'both' I would have chosen that but 'both equal' I wouldn't agree to because I would generally favour PS over LR.

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I had to answer neither which doesn't seem too accurate because I like them both for different elements - basically for pretty much the same reasons as djmorgan. Basic processing in LR then over to Photoshop for final tweaks, anything more complex and for checking at 100%.

But always LR for keywording

 

Callie,

 

My workflow is the same as yours and I answered 'both'.

 

The poll could have been worded a bit better.

 

John.

 

 

True - if it just said 'both' I would have chosen that but 'both equal' I wouldn't agree to because I would generally favour PS over LR.

 

 

Fair enough - I didn't take it as exactly 50-50%. I import into Lightroom with several presets, then export to Photoshop (at the moment Elements but just got CC) for spotting and resizing.

 

John.

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I had to answer neither which doesn't seem too accurate because I like them both for different elements - basically for pretty much the same reasons as djmorgan. Basic processing in LR then over to Photoshop for final tweaks, anything more complex and for checking at 100%.

But always LR for keywording

 

Callie,

 

My workflow is the same as yours and I answered 'both'.

 

The poll could have been worded a bit better.

 

John.

 

 

True - if it just said 'both' I would have chosen that but 'both equal' I wouldn't agree to because I would generally favour PS over LR.

 

 

Fair enough - I didn't take it as exactly 50-50%. I import into Lightroom with several presets, then export to Photoshop (at the moment Elements but just got CC) for spotting and resizing.

 

John.

 

 

Yeah, that's pretty much the same as i do 75% of the time. The other 25% I might do something a bit more in photoshop or miss out photoshop altogether.

Edited by Matt Ashmore

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Both in equal size for me. For pics that just need a little bit of retouching, LR is enough. For those requiring heavy work, I use both !

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I believe from the looks of it, most of us use both. I also use LR for basic adjustments then open into PS for spotting, cropping, and when needed, layer adjustments.

If someone told me I had to give up one program, I'd give up LR. For Layers, spotting, inspection at 100%, and keywording in Bridge. The only feature LR has I love and would miss is the upright tool.

There are many more features in PS that I would miss.

 

Yes, I know I can look at them at 100% in LR. Remember I do spotting in PS, so I inspect at 100% and do spotting there as I go.

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I believe from the looks of it, most of us use both. I also use LR for basic adjustments then open into PS for spotting, cropping, and when needed, layer adjustments.

If someone told me I had to give up one program, I'd give up LR. For Layers, spotting, inspection at 100%, and keywording in Bridge. The only feature LR has I love and would miss is the upright tool.

There are many more features in PS that I would miss.

 

Yes, I know I can look at them at 100% in LR. Remember I do spotting in PS, so I inspect at 100% and do spotting there as I go.

Betty, ACR (which comes with PS and Bridge) has all the same tools as LR. I use the upright tool all the time.

 

 

Edited to add: When I load images into ACR I load them as smart objects. This way when I am in PS, if I want to do some more processing, I just have to double click the image in the layers panel and it puts in back into ACR.

 

there is a Camera Raw filter now in PS, but it doesn't record the changes into your original xmp file that stores all the processing you have done in ACR. If you use the smart object, it will add the changes to your xmp file.

 

Jill

Edited by Jill Morgan

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I believe from the looks of it, most of us use both. I also use LR for basic adjustments then open into PS for spotting, cropping, and when needed, layer adjustments.

If someone told me I had to give up one program, I'd give up LR. For Layers, spotting, inspection at 100%, and keywording in Bridge. The only feature LR has I love and would miss is the upright tool.

There are many more features in PS that I would miss.

Yes, I know I can look at them at 100% in LR. Remember I do spotting in PS, so I inspect at 100% and do spotting there as I go.

 

Betty, ACR (which comes with PS and Bridge) has all the same tools as LR. I use the upright tool all the time.

Edited to add: When I load images into ACR I load them as smart objects. This way when I am in PS, if I want to do some more processing, I just have to double click the image in the layers panel and it puts in back into ACR.

there is a Camera Raw filter now in PS, but it doesn't record the changes into your original xmp file that stores all the processing you have done in ACR. If you use the smart object, it will add the changes to your xmp file.

Jill

I've used the upright tool in ACR. Maybe it's me, but the one in LR seems better at it. Plus LR CC has recently added a refinement to the upright tool where you can add points for more precision on harder to correct images. That's really the only LR tool I prefer over ACR/PS. Good idea about smart objects. :)

Betty

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Imho LR (and similar programs) can't be compared to PS (and competitors)...

 

LR is a tool to catalogue and do basic adjustments... PS can do everything... I use 90% LR for my photos on Alamy

 

For photographers shooting LOADS of photos, LR is a necesity: batch keywording, presets for eveything... So many stock photographers will use such software, at least for cataloging, keywording and basic adjustments... For more torough and/or creative editing PS is the tool.

 

Many of you will not agree with me... But I think most will agree that communication between Alamy and contributors about working with LR (and similar) and Alamy with benefit both... I understand that many also use Bridge and Phase One... So doing a tutorial, blog post covering them will be very useful...

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I do all my creative work in Photoshop. And am trying to learn Illustrator right now.

Darn that pen tool. ;). It's like trying to back a car with a trailer. You turn the steering opposite of the way you want the trailer to go.

Never was good with that. Think it's a man thing.

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I do all my creative work in Photoshop. And am trying to learn Illustrator right now.

Darn that pen tool. ;). It's like trying to back a car with a trailer. You turn the steering opposite of the way you want the trailer to go.

Never was good with that. Think it's a man thing.

 

Now Betty, lets not be sexist.  :)  I've backed up many a horse trailer full of horses.  Now if you're talking about backward thinking, that's a different story.  :lol:

 

Jill

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Betty, Illustrator is though! I know/use plenty of 2D/3D software from LR, PS, Autocad, Vectorworks, Renderworks, Sketchup, Vray, Indesing... and many others that I used before... Illustrator still remains though to use...

 

Good luck!

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I do all my creative work in Photoshop. And am trying to learn Illustrator right now.

Darn that pen tool. ;). It's like trying to back a car with a trailer. You turn the steering opposite of the way you want the trailer to go.

Never was good with that. Think it's a man thing.

 

 

Now Betty, lets not be sexist.  :)  I've backed up many a horse trailer full of horses.  Now if you're talking about backward thinking, that's a different story.  :lol:

 

Jill

LOL, I guess I'm getting that from the women in my family! My sister was bad with backing the boat down the ramp, and my daughter is worse. I stood on the ramp last spring and gave hand gestures for her, then turned gray waiting since she kept pulling back up to start over. That's what you do when you jackknife! :D

We did finally get in some good Crappie fishing by the rip-rap of a railroad bridge once we finally got on the lake.

 

The way I handle backing a boat is to refuse to try. Same when we had horses. No way. I don't parallel park either, at least without sweating blood when I absolutely have to. My husband can back boats and trailers blindfolded with one hand tied behind his back. That's why I hate him. <kidding>

Betty

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Betty, Illustrator is though! I know/use plenty of 2D/3D software from LR, PS, Autocad, Vectorworks, Renderworks, Sketchup, Vray, Indesing... and many others that I used before... Illustrator still remains though to use...

Good luck!

Yes, Michael, it is very tough! I'm going over and over the beginning lessons trying to create muscle memory in my brain and hand! What's great is when I finally get it right, it puts a big ole smile on my face. The pen tool is the hardest and the first to master in the book. I think the instructor who wrote the book believes if one can master that, the rest will be easier.

 

Geoff Kidd, who used to be on the forum, used to urge me to use the pen tool for cutouts. I never could figure it out.

This is a good book, and I'm watching videos, too.

 

I think I can...I think I can...

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