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Does anyone know what causes the geen-ish tints sometimes seen in images of white clouds against a blue sky? I have a couple of shots taken recently with a wide angle lens that have puffy white clouds that are a little green around the edges. It only really shows up when viewing at 100%. I assume it's a type of "fringing" (CA) or perhaps noise. At any rate, it's very slight and I can't seem to get rid of it.

 

Will QC be unhappy with this, I wonder. It isn't mentioned in Alamy's submission guidelines as far as I can see.

 

Here is a 100% crop (I hope):

 

greenclouds.jpg

 

F/8, ISO 200

Edited by John Mitchell
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Shift the blue hue toward magenta in raw conversion calibration.

 

Thanks again, shall give this a try. BTW, this was shot with the Sony NEX 16mm "pancake lens." I've noticed this effect before when using this lens. Have you?

 

I used auto white balance, shall also try different settings with the RAW file.

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Was the cloud above a grassy field or woodland?

 

Yes, it was above a green area. But I've seen the same effect in clouds over built-up places when using this particular lens.

 

I tried the colour correction that David suggested and also warmed up the white balance. This has helped considerably.

Edited by John Mitchell
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Here is the 100% crop after the colour correction that David suggested plus the warmer white balance. The green stuff appears to be all but gone. This has been very helpful because I have a couple of other shots -- taken with the same lens -- that I haven't submitted to Alamy due to this problem. The forum comes through again!

 

greenclouds2.jpg

Edited by John Mitchell
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Was the cloud above a grassy field or woodland?

 

Yes, it was above a green area. But I've seen the same effect in clouds over built-up places when using this particular lens.

 

I tried the colour correction that David suggested and also warmed up the white balance. This has helped considerably.

 

I was at Lake Powell in Utah here in the U.S. earlier this year with my father.  The desert floor is a redish color.  I noticed that the bottom of the clouds were a pink to red color - this was in the middle of the day and not during sunset/sunrise hours when you would normally expect it.  The green you are seeing may be the reflection of the green or woodland that Russell mentions.  Here is an example of what we saw...

 

D9H9GA.jpg

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Outside of photography, here in Sydney if you see a green tinge in cloud formations, it's time to get your car under cover, and get your animals inside as it's a sign of a large hailstorm!  Back in the April 1999, our garden was shredded by golf ball size hail stones. It caused 2 billion dollars worth of damage to tiled roofs in Sydney, seriously damaging some 24,000 houses and millions of dollars of damage to cars.   The storm lasted less than ten minutes.  Wiki report http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1999_Sydney_hailstorm

 

A young lawyer I worked for (a Brit) was unfamiliar with Sydney's somewhat interesting weather, left a party a little worse for wear and made her way home and was somewhat surprised to find devastation in her street in Paddington, an upmarket trendy downtown suburb.  She entered her terrace house to find her husband hiding in a cupboard under the stairs as he was sure that Sydney had been hit by an earthquake judging by the incredible noise the storm had created.  Her car, a convertible VW Golf which was parked in the street, had its roof completely stripped and the body damaged beyond repair.   One thing about Sydney weather - it's never boring!

 

Sheila

Edited by Sheila Smart
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Outside of photography, here in Sydney if you see a green tinge in cloud formations, it's time to get your car under cover, and get your animals inside as it's a sign of a large hailstorm!  Back in the April 1999, our garden was shredded by golf ball size hail stones. It caused 2 billion dollars worth of damage to tiled roofs in Sydney, seriously damaging some 24,000 houses and millions of dollars of damage to cars.   The storm lasted less than ten minutes.  Wiki report http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/1999_Sydney_hailstorm

 

A young lawyer I worked for (a Brit) was unfamiliar with Sydney's somewhat interesting weather, left a party a little worse for wear and made her way home and was somewhat surprised to find devastation in her street in Paddington, an upmarket trendy downtown suburb.  She entered her terrace house to find her husband hiding in a cupboard under the stairs as he was sure that Sydney had been hit by an earthquake judging by the incredible noise the storm had created.  Her car, a convertible VW Golf which was parked in the street, had its roof completely stripped and the body damaged beyond repair.   One thing about Sydney weather - it's never boring!

 

Sheila

I was thinking the same thing. And in my neck of the woods green clouds can mean a trip to the basement and hoping your house is still there when you come back up.

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Ah yes TABan, when we see green, time to find a safe place as I tornado is nearby. Then again sometimes one is oblivious to what is happening and sits right through one, only a few blocks away, clueless while on the computer.  :o

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Thanks for the extreme weather warnings. In future, I'll run for cover when I see menacing green clouds on the horizon.

 

In my case, though, I think green clouds have something to do with the colour balance or optics of one particular lens that I use. At least now I know how to fix the problem.

 

P.S. During the winter months, it rains so much here in Vancouver that it's the people who turn green, not the clouds.

Edited by John Mitchell
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