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I recently had a QC fail for the first time with chromatic aberration  (and what with the dreaded dust spots am getting paranoid about my images!)

I use a Canon 5d II with Canon 28-300 lens as it is great for travel.

Any tips for avoiding this problem and could the light in Tasmania where I have just been have any effect?

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Lightroom is amazingly good at removing chromatic aberration. If I didn't have every kind of short-term, long-term, every kind of term memory problems I'd tell you exactly where that is but it's not too hard to find and just clicking one little box usually does it. If not, there are sliders to use also.

 

Paulette

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It's hard to avoid CA with wide angle settings and sharp backlit edges, or shadow areas in leafy trees. I use a combination of CA removal in my image processing software, and finish with desaturating any remaining purple fringes using CS5 with this method:

 

http://tricks.onigo.net/guides/2005/09/chromatic-aberration-step-by-step.html

 

New in-camera software will alleviate the problem for most lenses...and there are probably even better CA removal tools out there.

 

Dave

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Lightroom is amazingly good at removing chromatic aberration. If I didn't have every kind of short-term, long-term, every kind of term memory problems I'd tell you exactly where that is but it's not too hard to find and just clicking one little box usually does it. If not, there are sliders to use also.

 

Paulette

 

Lightroom for me too!  I find that I rarely have to much beyond the default corrections offered here:

 

In LR 3.6: Under the Lens Corrections tab > check the Enable Profile Corrections box.  Most common lenses are listed here and yours should automatically be selected.  You can alter the CA slider if necessary and click on the manual option for fine tuning if need be.

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I'm a Nikon user and find that Nikon's proprietary software (View NX2 and Capture NX2 did a better job at removing CA than LR did (when I used LR, that is). LR is no slouch, mind.

 

Does Canon's DPP offer the same functionality? 

 

Aperture's handling of CA is pants, by the way.

Edited by Russell Watkins
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Yes Canon DPP will deal very well with CA and colour (color) blur. I use it exclusively for my Canon images and not had a failure yet for CA.

Sometimes colour (color) blur can be mistaken by others as CA.

 

Allan

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Use the Adobe Lens Correction Profile .lcp file in ACR or Lightroom (any version from 3 for LR, 4 I think for ACR with the MkII). This will instantly, once selected as a default, identify and correction for the focal length in use on the 28-135mm and also the aperture. It should deal with yellow-blue fringes completely, and does this by changing the actual scale of the R G and B channels when converted from raw, so it's very accurate and clean. You can fine tune it.

 

Current LR ACR has the option to removing fringeing in addition to regular CA, by using the upper sliders above the Hue range settings. This is not the same and needs real care, as setting a generous fringe removal like 5 pixels and using either Clarity or Sharpening controls can result in some ugly desaturated fringes. Leave these sliders at zero unless you get into-the-light purple or green fringes, typically seen around leaves/branches against a bright sky. These are not the same as CA fringes and the best way to deal with them is to find a lens which doesn't have 'em with your particular type of camera...

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Regular CA fringes are pretty easy to eliminate nowadays. However, "purple fringing" is another matter. I've never found the de-saturation method mentioned above to be totally satisfactory for getting  rid of purple fringes. It works, but the results can get pretty ugly if there is a lot to remove. As far as finding wide angle lenses that don't produce purple fringes goes, I'm always surprised at how many reviews of even very expensive lenses mention them. This seems to be something that most lens manufacturers haven't been able to deal with very effectively.

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I use to need to deal with CA regularly on my Canon L series wide zoom and also on my Sigma wide zoom. 

 

Since changing over to my Sony RX100, I can't remember the last time I had to correct CA. 

 

Occasionally have to sort a bit of purple fringing - bare branches against bright skies usually.

 

I'm guessing that this is due to the fixed zoom lens being well matched to the body/sensor/electronics.

 

John

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LR5 does it for me.

For CA removal LR4 does it for me.  That was the main reason for getting the upgrade from LR3 to LR4.  Before that I used the PT Lens plug-in in PS.

 

So far I have not seen any such compelling reason to upgrade LR4 to LR5

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Yes Canon DPP will deal very well with CA and colour (color) blur. I use it exclusively for my Canon images and not had a failure yet for CA.

Sometimes colour (color) blur can be mistaken by others as CA.

 

Allan

 

+1

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  • 3 weeks later...

I vote for DPP to remove CA as it does a fantastic job. LR sometimes can leave a grey line where the green or purple fringing occurs. 

If you need to apply CA to a group of images in DPP, apply the change and right click the image and 'copy recipe to clipboard' go to your next image and right click and 'paste recipe' 

 

This will apply the CA correction to your other image. Very time saving indeed :) 

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I vote for DPP to remove CA as it does a fantastic job. LR sometimes can leave a grey line where the green or purple fringing occurs. 

If you need to apply CA to a group of images in DPP, apply the change and right click the image and 'copy recipe to clipboard' go to your next image and right click and 'paste recipe' 

 

This will apply the CA correction to your other image. Very time saving indeed :)

Thanks. Hadn't thought of - it goes for other adjustments as well, I take it?

Edited by Niels Quist
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