Jump to content
IanGibson

Hungover From Film?

Recommended Posts

I don't miss the darkroom one bit.  My old enlarger still sits out in the drive shed. It can stay there.

 

Jill

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Still using my film era lenses, and missing the look of B&W film, but otherwise happy with digital.

 

I guess that I do miss that sense of excitement when the film came out of the tank.

 

I try to be selective with my shooting, not sure if this is a hangover from film, or related to my dislike of having to choose from numerous similar options in LR. I do however often take a few shots of the same scene in order to get the best exposure, and then delete in camera.

 

I don't understand why you would want to store images on SD cards, pricey and inefficient. How do you search for particular shots?

 

Re lead lined bags in radioactive zones - would be using them to protect my private parts, sod the sandwiches!

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Re lead lined bags in radioactive zones - would be using them to protect my private parts, sod the sandwiches!

 

You obviously used larger bags than I . . .

 

dd

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Being able to retire my unreliable OM-10 and OM-2 cameras was a blessing. I did not se my own darkroom, but relied on the labs. Some of those labs were real nasty, I had a feeling that they may have kept chicken in one of the labs, judging frm the amount of dirt in the films. Then order prints for a customer in 20 x 30 cm. But they did not fit in the standard envelope, so what does the lab do? They fold them! Or loose the film completely. Gettig rid of the labs was a pleasance too. Miss neither labs nor OM-'s

Only now and then I still insert a rollfilm in my nice Rolleiflex, working with that camera is just a pleasure. The digital Nikon aint bad either. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't understand why you would want to store images on SD cards, pricey and inefficient. How do you search for particular shots?

 

Sorry, I think you may have misunderstood; probably my fault. I meant to say that I transfer the images to my HD (which is backed up twice), but I also don't re-format the SD cards. I keep them stored in a drawer. It's a heart thing rather than a head thing.

 

I'm aware that three copies of my images, one of which is off site is sufficient. I guess I do it because I'm used to taking care of film which is removed from the camera, and because I've used film for more years than I've used digital, my mindset is to take care of the SD card as if it was something particularly precious.

 

It's a habit I think I'll change soon!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm replacing my laptop with a top-of-the-range abacus, my smartphone with two tin cans and a piece of string, and my DSLR for a pinhole camera fashioned from a shoe-box...

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just a polite attempt :) to put this topic back on track  should there be anything left to be said. The original post was not yet another film versus digital thing (only the marginally insane would want to go back to film I think unless there is a very good reason - sorry Colin and Alex :) ) but was essentially asking about what people have carried forward from film days into the digital age - Ian's very quirky and expensive  habit of keeping all his SD cards is the direction setter.

Edited by MDM

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Like others I don't chimp. I will very occasionally check exposure in tricky lighting, use it like a polaroid but never as a matter of course - I have immediate review switched off. From my film days I am confident that my technique will give a useable image that I can finish in post-processing (as I did in the darkroom). In most cases I know what I will get.

 

I NEVER machine-gun even when shooting sport. I may have it on fast wind but I will only shoot a short burst (usually fewer than five frames) when something happens to justify it, not in the hope of getting "the" shot. I usually find the first, the one I time, is the best in any case. I take the view that with a burst the decisive moment is just as likely to be between frames as not. That definitely goes back to film days - I couldn't afford the film for bursts or didn't have a motor-wind until towards the end. I used fast motorwind (mostly 4-5fps for film!) to be quickly ready for the next shot rather than to shoot sequences.

 

Also I don't expect AF, especially on action subjects, to be technique-free point and shoot. I shot sport with manual focus and later AF film cameras and you have to develop techniques to give the camera a chance. Even hugely expensive (£billions) military weapons systems need time to lock on to their targets, so expecting a camera to do otherwise is unreasonable.

Edited by Martin P Wilson

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The only work I do on digital is the miniscule amount I shoot if I'm away doing other photographic related stuff like exhibitions somewhere or masterclasses / workshops / lecturing etc. and have spare time. Plus I do a tiny amount of commissioned work for a few clients I have had for years. I certainly still use the disciplines from film days for that stuff and 'getting in right in the camera' saves time and post processing. 

 

Most of my other work is on 8" x 10" film so anyone here who baulks at paying for 35mm film and processing would totally freak out at what I shell out for that! It works out at roughly £25 a click, without any prints. (I shot 10 sheets yesterday and I have to get them right hence good basic technique). However, the upside is that the resulting images, (prints) sell each for sums which make even those expenses seem like peanuts so well worth it. Those who buy my work expect nothing else. 

  • Upvote 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

I don't understand why you would want to store images on SD cards, pricey and inefficient. How do you search for particular shots?

Sorry, I think you may have misunderstood; probably my fault. I meant to say that I transfer the images to my HD (which is backed up twice), but I also don't re-format the SD cards. I keep them stored in a drawer. It's a heart thing rather than a head thing.

 

I'm aware that three copies of my images, one of which is off site is sufficient. I guess I do it because I'm used to taking care of film which is removed from the camera, and because I've used film for more years than I've used digital, my mindset is to take care of the SD card as if it was something particularly precious.

 

It's a habit I think I'll change soon!

 

I have a better use for the £150/year that would cost me shooting RAW.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Like others I don't chimp. I will very occasionally check exposure in tricky lighting, use it like a polaroid but never as a matter of course - I have immediate review switched off. From my film days I am confident that my technique will give a useable image that I can finish in post-processing (as I did in the darkroom). In most cases I know what I will get.

 

Also I don't expect AF, especially on action subjects, to be technique-free point and shoot. I shot sport with manual focus and later AF film cameras and you have to develop techniques to give the camera a chance. Even hugely expensive (£billions) military weapons systems need time to lock on to their targets, so expecting a camera to do otherwise is unreasonable.

 

I do chimp. In my experience the camera rarely gets it as good it can be at the first attempt, particularly using manual focus lenses. I have very few images where there has not been some adjustment of the exposure. I still possess an incident light meter, but confess that its not been out of the box for years. Maybe I should warp it out......

 

Re auto focus, there are some situations where I regard it as being near essential (mainly people pics -  got to capture the moment without any messing about), but I would agree that speeding targets of a known trajectory are often best tackled with a locked pre-focus (which could be auto or otherwise). Not sure if that's what you meant Martin?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

I don't understand why you would want to store images on SD cards, pricey and inefficient. How do you search for particular shots?

Sorry, I think you may have misunderstood; probably my fault. I meant to say that I transfer the images to my HD (which is backed up twice), but I also don't re-format the SD cards. I keep them stored in a drawer. It's a heart thing rather than a head thing.

 

I'm aware that three copies of my images, one of which is off site is sufficient. I guess I do it because I'm used to taking care of film which is removed from the camera, and because I've used film for more years than I've used digital, my mindset is to take care of the SD card as if it was something particularly precious.

 

It's a habit I think I'll change soon!

 

I have a better use for the £150/year that would cost me shooting RAW.

 

 

 

Yep, I reckon you are right.  At least I now have plenty of cards to carry around, of all different sizes.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm replacing my laptop with a top-of-the-range abacus, my smartphone with two tin cans and a piece of string, and my DSLR for a pinhole camera fashioned from a shoe-box...

 

. . . your shoes came in a box? . . . you were lucky . . .

 

dd

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

€25/roll for 2' of 16mm. film? They're having a larf.

Edited by spacecadet

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

You never got to see what was on the film straight away anyway, and I doubt I ever took as many as 50 polaroids, so I don't chimp.

There's nothing quite like that slight trepidation when you finally get to see what you shot hours or days after you pressed the shutter. I'm using a camera with an EVF so I get a brief glimpse of the shot in the viewfinder after releasing the shutter. I guess it's reassuring, but it's disconcerting at first to see a still image in the viewfinder when you know your moving the camera. I think I once looked over the top of the camera to make sure the world hadn't stopped.

 

 

That's why I switched off review in my cameras. I shot film for 30+ years so I tend to be confident that I have got what I wanted (more or less ;) )

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Like others I don't chimp. I will very occasionally check exposure in tricky lighting, use it like a polaroid but never as a matter of course - I have immediate review switched off. From my film days I am confident that my technique will give a useable image that I can finish in post-processing (as I did in the darkroom). In most cases I know what I will get.

 

Also I don't expect AF, especially on action subjects, to be technique-free point and shoot. I shot sport with manual focus and later AF film cameras and you have to develop techniques to give the camera a chance. Even hugely expensive (£billions) military weapons systems need time to lock on to their targets, so expecting a camera to do otherwise is unreasonable.

 

I do chimp. In my experience the camera rarely gets it as good it can be at the first attempt, particularly using manual focus lenses. I have very few images where there has not been some adjustment of the exposure. I still possess an incident light meter, but confess that its not been out of the box for years. Maybe I should warp it out......

 

Re auto focus, there are some situations where I regard it as being near essential (mainly people pics -  got to capture the moment without any messing about), but I would agree that speeding targets of a known trajectory are often best tackled with a locked pre-focus (which could be auto or otherwise). Not sure if that's what you meant Martin?

 

 

Not quite Bryan, although I am very comfortable with manual prefocus on sports like showjumping (shot equestrian professionally for a good few years), motor sport, track and field etc.

 

I was actually talking about getting AF lock on moving subjects by picking it up early and taking first pressure on the shutter release but holding off making the exposure (for a fraction of second (or more if possible). That gives the camera to lock on (to process the AF signals) so that the lens has adjusted or the camera can follow focus. That so brief pause with half-pressure on the shutter increases the hit rate. Many people swing the camera on to the subject and press the shutter straight through as though AF is instantaneous, which it can never be. In a recent news event the adrenaline was flowing (the first highly aggressive demonstration I have covered in decades) and I forgot that part of my technique, my hit rate was a bit disapointing as a result. I don't blame the slow focussing lens (one of my slowest), lapses in my technique exacerbated the problem.

Edited by Martin P Wilson

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I could say I miss film, but I still use it. Just for fun and personal projects. My first camera was a Mamiya C220- I've had a number of Mamiyas since, switched to Bronica S2a at some point. Recently I bought a Mamiya C330 kit with 65mm, 105mm, and 180mm "Super". I also still on rare occasion shoot 4x5 and even rarer occasion 8x10. I develop films in the laundry room and occasionally have access to a few university darkrooms in the San Francisco Bay Area to print.

 

The positives of film include, nostalgia, a cathartic effect, cameras and lenses that don't become obsolete for decades, and actually learning a trade. 

 

At some level it's great that even a monkey can take a decent photo, but there's also something nice about learning a skill that takes time and skill to do. And that not everybody can (or at least wants to.) One of the issues with the stock photo biz is that the barrier to entry is very low, almost no skill is required, a decent camera costs relatively little. I don't think if I handed a monkey a box of sheet film and some holders he'd figure out how to load them ;-)

 

I've got boxes and boxes full of transparencies, very few have been digitised. Actually very few are worth digitising. I should go through and find the important stuff- I've got slides I took of what I could see of the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake from Treasure Island, little snippets of daily life in the former German Democratic Republic (like who'd of guessed they actually had ATM's back in 1989?!) That sort of stuff.

 

But I should also note of the very small number of analogue photos I do have on Alamy, the buy rate is very high (see the New Orleans photo and the two book covers below.)

 

night-photo-of-new-orleans-louisiana-ARG

(Photo of New Orleans at night taken with Mamiya C220)

9781447982265.jpgellory_rj_volmvend_10.jpg

 

portrait-of-a-woman-FNE4R1.jpg

(My "new" Mamiya also makes a nice prop when accompanied by a pretty woman)

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I could say I miss film, but I still use it. Just for fun and personal projects. My first camera was a Mamiya C220- I've had a number of Mamiyas since, switched to Bronica S2a at some point. Recently I bought a Mamiya C330 kit with 65mm, 105mm, and 180mm "Super". I also still on rare occasion shoot 4x5 and even rarer occasion 8x10. I develop films in the laundry room and occasionally have access to a few university darkrooms in the San Francisco Bay Area to print.

 

The positives of film include, nostalgia, a cathartic effect, cameras and lenses that don't become obsolete for decades, and actually learning a trade. 

 

At some level it's great that even a monkey can take a decent photo, but there's also something nice about learning a skill that takes time and skill to do. And that not everybody can (or at least wants to.) One of the issues with the stock photo biz is that the barrier to entry is very low, almost no skill is required, a decent camera costs relatively little. I don't think if I handed a monkey a box of sheet film and some holders he'd figure out how to load them ;-)

 

I've got boxes and boxes full of transparencies, very few have been digitised. Actually very few are worth digitising. I should go through and find the important stuff- I've got slides I took of what I could see of the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake from Treasure Island, little snippets of daily life in the former German Democratic Republic (like who'd of guessed they actually had ATM's back in 1989?!) That sort of stuff.

 

But I should also note of the very small number of analogue photos I do have on Alamy, the buy rate is very high (see the New Orleans photo and the two book covers below.)

 

night-photo-of-new-orleans-louisiana-ARG

(Photo of New Orleans at night taken with Mamiya C220)

9781447982265.jpgellory_rj_volmvend_10.jpg

 

portrait-of-a-woman-FNE4R1.jpg

(My "new" Mamiya also makes a nice prop when accompanied by a pretty woman)

 

 

 

I like the new bipod support. Where can I get one? ;)

 

Allan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Allan, you can get anything on the internet ;-)

 

Michael

You should think about getting your snippets of DDR life scanned and uploaded, I would think that there would be a decent market for that kind of material. It might even be eligible for upload via the archive route rather than as standard stock.

Colin

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Allan, you can get anything on the internet ;-)

 

Michael

You should think about getting your snippets of DDR life scanned and uploaded, I would think that there would be a decent market for that kind of material. It might even be eligible for upload via the archive route rather than as standard stock.

Colin

 

I think you're right. I need to dig through thousands of slides or at least find the crappy scans from 10 years ago. I just checked my Alamy site and found a grand total of three GDR images.

 

changing-of-the-guard-in-front-of-the-meNVA (National People's Army) the changing of the guard at the Memorial to the Victims of Fascism, 1987

 

berlin-wall-intra-german-frontier-ARG8WGThe Intra-German Frontier (or as you Wessis like to call it, "The Wall" ;-) )1987- You will also notice the Sting lyric "If you Love Somebody- Set Them Free" and those a4 papers are census papers that were being stuck to "The Wall" in protest as I recall.

 

reflection-of-the-berlin-cathedral-in-th1989 Reflection of the Berlin Cathedral in the Palace of the Republic (Palast der Republic) I was really bummed that the united Germany bulldozed this building. It looked really cool, and in principal I really like the way it worked. There are a lot of bad things people could legitimately say about the GDR, but normal people could hang out and eat dinner, watch a concert, get married or otherwise interact only feet from the highest level of government. 

 

I know I have a few snaps from other things like I mentioned- an ATM, phone booth, shop windows with electronics, kosher food, and what passed for fashion there and then. Looking at my slides from a daytrip in 1989, only in retrospect did I notice that there was window dressing for the 40th anniversary celebration- only a short time before the collapse of the GDR. I'll add this to my list of things to do ;-)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.