Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Jill Morgan

Why do I keep missing photo opportunities?

Recommended Posts

I do complain that out here in the country, there aren't a lot of image opportunities. I mean how many cows can you photograph and empty fields aren't in big demand.

 

Yet I find myself constantly missing opportunities when they present themselves.  Had car issues last week.  So big big tow truck comes to crank it on and take it to the mechanics.   Did I think to take any shots? No.  Before they came I had a friend over to try and boost it with her truck.  Did I think to take any shots? No.  Then yesterday I had a scrap guy come to pick up an old van and take it away.  Did I think to take any shots? No.

 

Maybe I need a flashing neon sign in my house that constantly says - Is there a photo out there?

 

Jill

 

 

  • Upvote 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I am constantly kicking myself for missing obvious opportunities!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Jill, if you would earn $100 each time a photo is sold, would you "see" more photos around you to be taken? ;)

... Like a machine - this mechanism needs fuel :)

  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm exactly the same, Jill, and I don't think I'm ever going to change.

 

Alan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was once told many years ago the biggest risk to your success in stock photography is missed opportunities and the camera sat on the shelf no being focused!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For me, I decided it's better to skip constant, 'small' photographic opportunities, so I can have:

  • more time to experience people & what's going on, without lens between us
  • more time to focus on & create bigger photographic opportunities - covering a few more major events to submit to a couple of agencies +  getting direct client assignments, where I know the photos will earn fee, be used 

- ann

Edited by ann
  • Upvote 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Maybe I need a flashing neon sign in my house that constantly says - Is there a photo out there?

 

Jill

 

 

Or in here?

 

Do a Betty and try indoor photography too. ;)

 

Allan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

For me, I decided it's better to skip constant, 'small' photographic opportunities, so I can have:

  • more time to experience people & what's going on, without lens between us
  • more time to focus on & create bigger photographic opportunities - covering a few more major events to submit to a couple of agencies +  getting direct client assignments, where I know the photos will earn fee, be used 

- ann

 

Problem is being out here in the country, there aren't too many big photographic opportunities.  I have considered going to the Toronto Film Festival in Toronto in September, but problem with that is my other businesses (the ones that pay the mortgage) keep me way too busy.  So I am limited to the smaller ones for now.   Devoting time and money just on photography doesn't seem a good use of resources. 

 

 

 

 

Maybe I need a flashing neon sign in my house that constantly says - Is there a photo out there?

 

Jill

 

 

Or in here?

 

Do a Betty and try indoor photography too. ;)

 

Allan

 

 

 

I am considering this.  I have the photobox,  lights, etc.  But it absolutely bores me to death.

 

Jill

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Seeing photo opportunities I associate with feeling alert, creative and seeing the glass half full. Missing photo opportunities I associate with feeling detached, introspective and seeing the glass half empty. It works the other way too, and a focused session of photography invariably improves my mood and makes me feel 'connected'.

 

It's a mistake, I reckon, to wish we lived somewhere else, with better weather, more opportunities, etc. It's a cop-out. Also, we can 'make' opportunities, not just 'take' them. I took a 'vow' a few years ago, that I would make picture taking my first priority: ie if I see a photo opportunity I'll try to get the shot there and then. If I think "I must do that shot some time", it'll never happen. I still miss a lot of shots, but not as many as I used to... :)

Edited by John Morrison
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Always carry a camera and opportunities will present themselves. I walked back from the local shops the other day and noticed that the new leisure centre was open for business, while there were wild orchids growing in marshy ground in the park. The stream that runs through the park disappears into a culvert, and the entry was blocked with tree trunks and debris. I don't expect these subjects to make me a fortune, but they might generate a sale at some point.

 

If you are running another business, upon which your livelihood depends, you perhaps can't expect to think "photograph" all of the time.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I do complain that out here in the country, there aren't a lot of image opportunities. I mean how many cows can you photograph and empty fields aren't in big demand.

 

Jill

 

Do a lot of research of what's in demand in the market place that you are concentrating on. Make a shoot list, revise as you learn more or as market changes. That's is not "anything and everything" that has a remote chance of selling, but those images that are in constant demand. Once you understand that, you'll immediately recognize a real opportunity when you see it.

 

Better yet, do not spend time chasing "found" images. Create and set up "opportunities" at your convenience.

 

GI

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm pretty good at taking opportunities. I got the shots of hubby's car being loaded up on the tow trailer. I got the shot of the truck loading up our pile of lumber on Big Trash Day. I got the shots of the men cutting down our tree a few months ago, and I got the shots of the men building a new house across our back fence.

Then I got the shots of the cable guy workin at the top of a pole, and the guy in the lift working on the electric power pole.

Passed by a yard sale, got it.

Saw the kids playing street basketball across the street down a bit. Ethnic, mixed races. Got it.

Then the kids playing a game on the lawn across the street, abandoned my own garage sale, grabbed my camera and those images have sold and are still being zoomed. They bought the game from my garage sale, how about that? :) ethnic, mixed races. I've gotten boys on mini bikes, on skateboards. A mother on a bike towing a baby in some contraption. People fishing, when I actually hoped to shoot egrets or blue herons.

Of course, I'm not in the countryside so I see more opportunities. But I can actually go out on a shoot and on the way to or from, see things of opportunity. I grab them with both hands with a camera between. Oh, yeah, the family member taking an after dinner nap in his recliner. Sold.

Edited by Betty LaRue
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Always carry a camera and opportunities will present themselves. I walked back from the local shops the other day and noticed that the new leisure centre was open for business, while there were wild orchids growing in marshy ground in the park. The stream that runs through the park disappears into a culvert, and the entry was blocked with tree trunks and debris. I don't expect these subjects to make me a fortune, but they might generate a sale at some point.

 

If you are running another business, upon which your livelihood depends, you perhaps can't expect to think "photograph" all of the time.

 

 

Ohh so True '... If you are running another business, upon which your livelihood depends, you perhaps can't expect to think "photograph" all of the time ...'

 

To change the mindset is often the challenge and time wasted

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Always carry a camera and opportunities will present themselves. I walked back from the local shops the other day and noticed that the new leisure centre was open for business, while there were wild orchids growing in marshy ground in the park. The stream that runs through the park disappears into a culvert, and the entry was blocked with tree trunks and debris. I don't expect these subjects to make me a fortune, but they might generate a sale at some point.

 

If you are running another business, upon which your livelihood depends, you perhaps can't expect to think "photograph" all of the time.

 

 

Ohh so True '... If you are running another business, upon which your livelihood depends, you perhaps can't expect to think "photograph" all of the time ...'

 

To change the mindset is often the challenge and time wasted

 

 

... and if you think in photograph while running another business, this just adds termendeously to the missed pictures opportunities

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I do miss a lot of opportunities myself and lately I have noticed some kind of family revolt against having a person constantly photographing around. Sometimes I can see the disappointment in the face of my family members when we are headed out and I reach for the tripod and camera.

 

If I was making piles of money I think it is possible that reactions would be a little better, but is it worth upsetting friends and family taking pictures all the time to get dimes or, in my case here, nothing? I have settled for planned photography sections. Either I go out alone or join photography meet ups with other freaks like me. Sometimes I explain to family and friends, way before a trip, that there will be snapshots, but I no longer expect that family members will want to go out with me if I stop every three minutes to adjust camera settings and the tripod to take that perfect shot, or that everyone will be happy to wait for a late dinner because I am waiting for that sunset.

 

Social and family life and photography may not always be easy to combine, and we need to chose very carefully which opportunities we will take, and when.

Edited by AlessandraRC

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I do miss a lot of opportunities myself and lately I have noticed some kind of family revolt against having a person constantly photographing around. Sometimes I can see the disappointment in the face of my family members when we are headed out and I reach for the tripod and camera.

 

Social and family life and photography may not always be easy to combine, and we need to chose very carefully which opportunities we will take, and when.

Ditch the tripod, it's not needed for the majority of stock shots, but you are right, compromise is necessary in this situation. When I visit a new location with my long suffering wife we generally go our separate ways, agreeing to meet for a coffee after a period of time. (I don't like sniffing around shops while she doesn't want to hang around while I mess about with the camera!) As my stock income has increased she has become more tolerant of my antics, and does occasionaly suggest photo opps. Of course if you have the kids in tow, photography is going to be a low priority.

 

A further concession, I dumped my heavy and cumbersome FF DSLR kit and moved over to CSC, it's less obtrusive and takes less space when travelling. Again, the quality is more than good enough for stock.

Edited by Bryan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

I do miss a lot of opportunities myself and lately I have noticed some kind of family revolt against having a person constantly photographing around. Sometimes I can see the disappointment in the face of my family members when we are headed out and I reach for the tripod and camera.

 

Social and family life and photography may not always be easy to combine, and we need to chose very carefully which opportunities we will take, and when.

Ditch the tripod, it's not needed for the majority of stock shots, but you are right, compromise is necessary in this situation. When I visit a new location with my long suffering wife we generally go our separate ways, agreeing to meet for a coffee after a period of time. (I don't like sniffing around shops while she doesn't want to hang around while I mess about with the camera!) As my stock income has increased she has become more tolerant of my antics, and does occasionaly suggest photo opps. Of course if you have the kids in tow, photography is going to be a low priority.

 

A further concession, I dumped my heavy and cumbersome FF DSLR kit and moved over to CSC, it's less obtrusive and takes less space when travelling. Again, the quality is more than good enough for stock.

 

 

And if worsts comes to worst.. there's always your mobile phone which although is not good for images to submit to Alamy, is good for submitting via other avenues which we are no longer allowed to discuss here....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

 

Maybe I need a flashing neon sign in my house that constantly says - Is there a photo out there?

 

Jill

 

 

Or in here?

 

Do a Betty and try indoor photography too. ;)

 

Allan

 

 

 

I am considering this.  I have the photobox,  lights, etc.  But it absolutely bores me to death.

 

Jill

 

 

 

You don't need all the gubbins, unless you want to shoot product.

 

I shoot indoors in natural light and sometimes a bit of fill flash from built in flash, no box/tent, just watch for unwanted items in the background.

 

Like this or this one.

 

Allan

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I used to have my camera with me all times, but lately not that much.

I actually have a lot of old stuff that I didn't process yet on my backlog.

But still, an opportunity is always on the corner.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.