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Wawa

What happens to older images below required 17MB?

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Currently Alamy minimum file size requirement is 17MB JPEGs, but I was wondering what happens to photos made from lower res cameras from a few years back.  About 10-15 years ago, the top of the line Nikon (The D1H, which was a 2.7MB camera) produced a 7MB JPEG file.  Just wondering what happens to all those older images that fall below the current requirement?   My current camera gives me a 45MB file, well over the minimum required file size but I would like to keep future images competitive and "on the market" as long as possible.  Today, Nikon's D810 is a 36M camera and I believe the latest monster file Canon is a 50MB camera, but 10-15 years from now we'll probably be able to get that from our cell phone cameras.  Should we shoot with the largest file sized cameras available today to increase image longevity?  Thanks.

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Currently Alamy minimum file size requirement is 17MB JPEGs, but I was wondering what happens to photos made from lower res cameras from a few years back.  About 10-15 years ago, the top of the line Nikon (The D1H, which was a 2.7MB camera) produced a 7MB JPEG file.  Just wondering what happens to all those older images that fall below the current requirement?   My current camera gives me a 45MB file, well over the minimum required file size but I would like to keep future images competitive and "on the market" as long as possible.  Today, Nikon's D810 is a 36M camera and I believe the latest monster file Canon is a 50MB camera, but 10-15 years from now we'll probably be able to get that from our cell phone cameras.  Should we shoot with the largest file sized cameras available today to increase image longevity?  Thanks.

 

What do you mean 10-15 years from now :) - the Nokia 40MP (120MB) or thereabouts phone cameras was released a few years ago.

 

Your 15MP camera files (I presume that is what you mean by 45MB) should be fine for general stock way down the line. Alamy's size requirements have actually fallen over the years from 48MB to 17MB with the transition from film scans to DSLRs presumably. It use to be necessary to interpolate images up to 16MP (48MB) which was a standard size for scans. I don't know about current size requirements or trends with other agencies.

 

The early DSLRs produced very small files and were incredibly expensive but, by 2004 or so, Canon had brought more affordable DSLRs at 6MP to market which would still be adequate for Alamy. I don't know if Alamy accepted the very small files from the early Nikons.

 

Sensor sizes were rapdily increasing for a number of years but things have now pretty much plateaued out in terms of rapidly increasing sensor sizes. I doubt that there are too many 50MP Canons flying off the shelves. I would guess that 20-24MP covers most uses for most photographers now and in the future, including lots of crop room, and 12MP will still do most things but doesn't leave a lot of room for cropping. Size is just one factor of course and on its own not the most important - image quality in general is more important although some aspects of image quality (e.g dynamic range) are related to sensor size.

Edited by MDM

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My most licensed image on Alamy was shot with a KODAK / NIKON DCS620 at 1600ISO.

Took me almost a month to prep it for submission....

 

Bottom line is that it is the IMAGE.

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Wawa one thing you should do to keep the longevity of your images is take them in RAW

I have seen a lot of improvement in the software that processes the images so I can revisit my old files and process them better from time to time.

I believe an old 8Mpixels file will still be useful for a long time, but of course you should use the maximum resolution your camera can offer.

And Chuck is right, in the end it is the Image that counts, like an old song, we will keep hearing it no matter the quality of the recording equipment that was used at the time.

Edited by Alexandre Fagundes
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The DCS image I wrote about was shot RAW as is everything I do.

Thanks Alexandre for the good advice.

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I vaguely remember those early days of 'resized' (upscaled) files that I used to submit here using LIZARDTECH upsizing programme for my Nikon70D

6MP camera (17.2 Mb files uncompressed) ... and the submission requirement here then was 48Mb.

Edited by Kumar

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Guest

Currently Alamy minimum file size requirement is 17MB JPEGs, but I was wondering what happens to photos made from lower res cameras from a few years back.  About 10-15 years ago, the top of the line Nikon (The D1H, which was a 2.7MB camera) produced a 7MB JPEG file.  Just wondering what happens to all those older images that fall below the current requirement?   My current camera gives me a 45MB file, well over the minimum required file size but I would like to keep future images competitive and "on the market" as long as possible.  Today, Nikon's D810 is a 36M camera and I believe the latest monster file Canon is a 50MB camera, but 10-15 years from now we'll probably be able to get that from our cell phone cameras.  Should we shoot with the largest file sized cameras available today to increase image longevity?  Thanks.

 

What happens to them, if the content (as Chuck said is good) they sell, a couple of weeks ago I had a nice commercial use (other agency) from a Canon 20D file. That camera still produces sales for wrap-around covers on books and commercial POS uses. It is (was) an 8mp camera. I've revisited a few raws and done better conversions but 8-12mp still does the job for stock clients.

 

The obsession with megapixels is not driven by clients, quite frankly most don't given a monkey's as long as the file reads ok and the content is what they want. It was, and always will be, about the image.

Edited by Guest

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My image AC1FPY of a moth was taken with a 6mp Nikon D70 and a Sigma 105 macro. Up sized to 50mb. Requirement was 48mb. When I bought that camera, a 6mp camera was the latest thing.

By the time Alamy allowed 17mb, most of us were shooting at least 10mp or larger. And some of us crop or downsize to attain sharpness, so 17mb images will keep rolling in.

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My image AC1FPY of a moth was taken with a 6mp Nikon D70 and a Sigma 105 macro. Up sized to 50mb. Requirement was 48mb. When I bought that camera, a 6mp camera was the latest thing.

By the time Alamy allowed 17mb, most of us were shooting at least 10mp or larger. And some of us crop or downsize to attain sharpness, so 17mb images will keep rolling in.

 

I am no expert on the subject (an understatement), but I've read that the bigger pixels of those older 6MP to 10MP DSLRs made for superior up-rezzing.

 

I'm actually sorry that I sold my 10MP DSLR that I used for years. It produced high-quality files that up-sized to 50MP very well. It wasn't much good beyond ISO 400, though.

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Is up-sizing still permitted?

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My image AC1FPY of a moth was taken with a 6mp Nikon D70 and a Sigma 105 macro. Up sized to 50mb. Requirement was 48mb. When I bought that camera, a 6mp camera was the latest thing.

By the time Alamy allowed 17mb, most of us were shooting at least 10mp or larger. And some of us crop or downsize to attain sharpness, so 17mb images will keep rolling in.

 

 

I am no expert on the subject (an understatement), but I've read that the bigger pixels of those older 6MP to 10MP DSLRs made for superior up-rezzing.

 

I'm actually sorry that I sold my 10MP DSLR that I used for years. It produced high-quality files that up-sized to 50MP very well. It wasn't much good beyond ISO 400, though.

That may be so, because I am amazed at how well they uprezzed. But yes, I was nervous at shooting 400 ISO, let alone anything higher. Part of my routine on developing the D70 images was selective use of noise ninja on all skies and dark areas.

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