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Doing some PP earlier, I tried to drag & drop an image of a restaurant check with two bills, a $20 and a $1, folded on top of it . . . but my copy of PhotoShop CS5 would not accept the image. Instead, a warning window opened telling me that I cannot edit pictures of paper money. I thought it was a mistake, so I tried it again, and the same thing happened. 

 

I have done this same subject before, with the same copy of CS5. I was under the impression that in America I am not allowed to photograph either side of a complete bill. But these two bills were folded, one over the other. 

 

Has anyone else had this happen?  :huh:

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Yes, it happens with a number of softwares. When I wanted to have images of various currencies for materials in 3D rendering, I needed face on full images of a banknote. I found I had to use GIMP on USD in order to work on them. I remeber when it came up before, an Adobe rep saying it was a Secret Service issue and was introduced in 2004.

 

http://www.tek-tips.com/viewthread.cfm?qid=745605

Edited by Guest
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I wonder if it catches sterling- another reason for keeping away from subscriptions?

No possibility of disconnecting to work on the images, I suppose.

Edited by spacecadet
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I wonder if it catches sterling- another reason for keeping away from subscriptions?

No possibility of disconnecting to work on the images, I suppose.

 

It happens on standalone versions as well and it applies to all currency not just $'s. CS6 refused to edit images of full bank notes (sterling). 

 

Edit.

If I remember correctly, there are dots/markers on notes that the adobe (and other software) are able to identify and when they do, the warning comes up! Very annoying!

 

Link for EURion constellation. It was introduced late 1990's to stop photocopying. It is very likely that software may well be using this to identify notes. If you know where the marks are, you can obscure them (careful composition) and the image may well load correctly

Edited by Duncan_Andison
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I wonder if it catches sterling- another reason for keeping away from subscriptions?

No possibility of disconnecting to work on the images, I suppose.

 

It happens on standalone versions as well and it applies to all currency not just $'s. CS6 refused to edit images of full bank notes (sterling). 

 

Edit.

If I remember correctly, there are dots/markers on notes that the adobe (and other software) are able to identify and when they do, the warning comes up! Very annoying!

 

Link for EURion constellation. It was introduced late 1990's to stop photocopying. It is very likely that software may well be using this to identify notes. If you know where the marks are, you can obscure them (careful composition) and the image may well load correctly

 

 

It only happens on an unedited image - if you edit in GIMP or maybe another software then it is possible, just done it, to open a full face USD in Photoshop and subsequently edit it.

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yes also had this on euros - although found it was fine when first opening a RAW file, I could work on it and make changes, it was when saving it came up with the error - but providing I did not save a full bank note image it was fine.

I did this image by photographing flat bank notes individually then loading the RAW files in to CS5 and doing all editing before saving - no problems saving the final image, only the individual notes

http://c7.alamy.com/comp/EFG051/falling-euro-bank-notes-and-coins-EFG051.jpg

Edited by Callie
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I wonder if it catches sterling- another reason for keeping away from subscriptions?

No possibility of disconnecting to work on the images, I suppose.

 

It happens on standalone versions as well and it applies to all currency not just $'s. CS6 refused to edit images of full bank notes (sterling). 

 

Edit.

If I remember correctly, there are dots/markers on notes that the adobe (and other software) are able to identify and when they do, the warning comes up! Very annoying!

 

Link for EURion constellation. It was introduced late 1990's to stop photocopying. It is very likely that software may well be using this to identify notes. If you know where the marks are, you can obscure them (careful composition) and the image may well load correctly

 

 

It only happens on an unedited image - if you edit in GIMP or maybe another software then it is possible, just done it, to open a full face USD in Photoshop and subsequently edit it.

 

 

Cheers. So are you editing out the marks or just any type of small edit and save then it opens in PS?

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I wonder if it catches sterling- another reason for keeping away from subscriptions?

No possibility of disconnecting to work on the images, I suppose.

 

It happens on standalone versions as well and it applies to all currency not just $'s. CS6 refused to edit images of full bank notes (sterling). 

 

Edit.

If I remember correctly, there are dots/markers on notes that the adobe (and other software) are able to identify and when they do, the warning comes up! Very annoying!

 

Link for EURion constellation. It was introduced late 1990's to stop photocopying. It is very likely that software may well be using this to identify notes. If you know where the marks are, you can obscure them (careful composition) and the image may well load correctly

 

 

It only happens on an unedited image - if you edit in GIMP or maybe another software then it is possible, just done it, to open a full face USD in Photoshop and subsequently edit it.

 

 

Cheers. So are you editing out the marks or just any type of small edit and save then it opens in PS?

 

 

All i did was open, crop and save - I don't know how it alters the situation. I also changed the numbers but that was in Photoshop. The materials for the notes are real notes and one shot full face on.

 

close-up-of-stacks-of-100-dollar-bills-c

Edited by Guest
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I wonder if it catches sterling- another reason for keeping away from subscriptions?

No possibility of disconnecting to work on the images, I suppose.

 

It happens on standalone versions as well and it applies to all currency not just $'s. CS6 refused to edit images of full bank notes (sterling). 

 

Edit.

If I remember correctly, there are dots/markers on notes that the adobe (and other software) are able to identify and when they do, the warning comes up! Very annoying!

 

Link for EURion constellation. It was introduced late 1990's to stop photocopying. It is very likely that software may well be using this to identify notes. If you know where the marks are, you can obscure them (careful composition) and the image may well load correctly

 

 

It only happens on an unedited image - if you edit in GIMP or maybe another software then it is possible, just done it, to open a full face USD in Photoshop and subsequently edit it.

 

 

Cheers. So are you editing out the marks or just any type of small edit and save then it opens in PS?

 

 

All i did was open, crop and save - I don't know how it alters the situation. I also changed the numbers but that was in Photoshop. The materials for the notes are real notes and one shot full face on.

 

close-up-of-stacks-of-100-dollar-bills-c

 

 

Excellent, thanks. I'll be working on some concept shots soon that will involve money so this will hopefully resolve some headaches!

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I got this a while back and was diverted here:

 

From the bank of England:

 

http://www.bankofengland.co.uk/banknotes/Pages/reproducing_banknotes.aspx

 

 

"Under section 18(1) of the Forgery and Counterfeiting Act 1981 it is a criminal offence for any person, without the prior consent in writing of the Bank of England, to reproduce on any substance whatsoever, and whether or not on the correct scale, any Bank of England banknote or any part of a Bank of England banknote. The Bank of England also owns the copyright in its banknotes."

 

It seems to be saying BofE notes can't be copied at all.

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Have had this problem with Photoshop CC, got around it by loading the raw file onto my laptop and doing the basic processing using Photoshop CS2 and then transferring the TIFF back to my Mac and finishing off the processing there....

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I wonder if it catches sterling- another reason for keeping away from subscriptions?

No possibility of disconnecting to work on the images, I suppose.

 

It happens on standalone versions as well and it applies to all currency not just $'s. CS6 refused to edit images of full bank notes (sterling). 

 

Edit.

If I remember correctly, there are dots/markers on notes that the adobe (and other software) are able to identify and when they do, the warning comes up! Very annoying!

 

Link for EURion constellation. It was introduced late 1990's to stop photocopying. It is very likely that software may well be using this to identify notes. If you know where the marks are, you can obscure them (careful composition) and the image may well load correctly

 

 

It only happens on an unedited image - if you edit in GIMP or maybe another software then it is possible, just done it, to open a full face USD in Photoshop and subsequently edit it.

 

 

Cheers. So are you editing out the marks or just any type of small edit and save then it opens in PS?

 

 

All i did was open, crop and save - I don't know how it alters the situation. I also changed the numbers but that was in Photoshop. The materials for the notes are real notes and one shot full face on.

 

close-up-of-stacks-of-100-dollar-bills-c

 

 

Excellent, thanks. I'll be working on some concept shots soon that will involve money so this will hopefully resolve some headaches!

 

 

This was years ago but I now realise I may well have shot the images as jpegs to get around the convertor - I don't know if GIMP can support raw, I only remember it being very cumbersome to use. All you can do is experiment.

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Yes, it happens with a number of softwares. When I wanted to have images of various currencies for materials in 3D rendering, I needed face on full images of a banknote. I found I had to use GIMP on USD in order to work on them. I remeber when it came up before, an Adobe rep saying it was a Secret Service issue and was introduced in 2004.

 

http://www.tek-tips.com/viewthread.cfm?qid=745605

 

 

Fascinating, Geoff. Yes, the Secrete Service is the government agency here that deals with counterfeiting. My workflow goes from LR5.7 to CS5, with a sometimes stop in NX2. I'm not in the Cloud. 

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I've photographed a LOT of banknotes and never had a problem - admittedly a lot of them are pretty old but I also use a version of Elements, not full PS, which doesn't seem quite so public spirited.

It is true that banknote designs these days include subtle use of coloured dots that are recognised by photocopiers and software to stop them being copied.

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/EURion_constellation

Edited by Phil Robinson
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The new Swiss 50 Francs banknote also features the EURion pattern, but I had no issue in postprocessing with Lightroom 6.

 

 

50-swiss-francs-banknote-of-the-new-2016 50-swiss-francs-banknote-of-the-new-2016

 

 

50 Swiss Francs banknote of the new 2016 series, featuring a wind and experience themed motif. Black background.
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I got this a while back and was diverted here:

 

From the bank of England:

 

http://www.bankofengland.co.uk/banknotes/Pages/reproducing_banknotes.aspx

 

 

"Under section 18(1) of the Forgery and Counterfeiting Act 1981 it is a criminal offence for any person, without the prior consent in writing of the Bank of England, to reproduce on any substance whatsoever, and whether or not on the correct scale, any Bank of England banknote or any part of a Bank of England banknote. The Bank of England also owns the copyright in its banknotes."

 

It seems to be saying BofE notes can't be copied at all.

Surely, as with other copyright material, editorial use is fine?  Obviously you can't use a bank note in advertising or your company logo.

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It is technically an offence but one can't imagine action being taken on simple illustrations. If necessary one could argue that "on any substance" only covers printing and not electronic reproduction.

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