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Although I did a local community college's Photoshop 7 course back in 2003, I've not used it much since 2006 and have gone a bit rusty.  I now have Adobe CS4, and the main/basic features appear very similar. 

My current problem is that I'd like to start registering my catalog of around 2k travel related images with a reputable photobank, such as Alamy (recommended by a pro music photographer friend in London, England) and for storage purposes over the years I have compressed the image files to 1mb, or less!

QUESTION:  Please, what is the best way to increase a jpeg file size from 1MB to 17MB minimum in Adobe CS4?  (Then I just have to deal with some hand-held quality issues!).

All help greatly appreciated!

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Not a professional photographer myself, but increasing or decreasing file size does not make any difference to uncompressed image size (seen when one clicks image size in Photoshop 7 (that I have worked with)). For increasing or decreasing file size Ctrl+Shift+S leads to saving file, next step automatically shows file size menu on which one can type 1 (minimum file size) to 12 (maximum file size) or simple slide the tool bar to required size. We are advised to save at maximum (12) for photo submission in stock images website.This is my personal experience.

Edited by Gurcharan

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Quote from: http://www.alamy.com/contributor/how-to-sell-images/guidelines-for-submitting-images/ :

 

JPEG file size of over 17MB (when uncompressed)
This is likely to have a compressed JPEG size of 3-5MB. Opening a JPEG in an image program such as Adobe Photoshop will show you the uncompressed (open) file size.

 

unquote

 

The file size is the uncompressed  8-jpg file size, not the compressed file size of your actual file - can be seen at the bottom of your PhotoShop once the image is opened as stated above.

 

Upsizing images is not recommended any longer.

 

Niels

 

Edited:Upsizing or downsizing is done in "Image Size" - I think Gurcharan is talking about image quality.

Edited by Niels Quist

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If you have compressed native files from your camera to 1MB or less, then you probably used a very low quality setting when saving them in Photoshop. Correct?

 

Alamy requires a JPEG quality setting of at least 10 when saving files, so unfortunately you may not be able to submit them.

Edited by John Mitchell

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Sorry to be blunt, but if you want to be able to submit images to Alamy that meet the required quality, then the first thing that you need to do is get a thorough understanding of how images are represented in digital form, how image compression works and what that means in terms of file sizes. Whether your images are able to meet the Alamy requirements is not something that anyone can answer without looking at each image. From what you say, you are probably way outside what is acceptable. When I submit images at just above the minimum size required, I am still submitting JPEGs that are 4 - 5 M bytes in size. 

Edited by Keith Douglas
  • Upvote 5

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Reality check on already accepted image

 

51.3M  uncompressed     5184 x 3456 pixels   Canon 550 D 18 mp
remains the same when you increase or decrease image quality on 1-12 scale and save the file, Alamy recommends you to save more than 10
Here are corresponding file sizes: 12    5.6 mb  ; 11    3.81 mb; 10    3.13 mb; 9     2.64  mb; 8     1.59  mb; 7     1.13  mb; 6     1.15  mb; 5     892   kb; 4     735   kb; 3     619   kb
2     560   kb; 1     418   kb
 
Only increasing or decreasing width (height would change automatically if they are locked; normal feature) would change size of uncompressed size. just two examples here:
 
width 5284  size 53.3,; width 5384 size 55.3). This is, however, not recommended.
 

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