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Last year, I came across an image (direct sale via Alamy) in the prestigious (?) "The Economist" magazine and was surprised to see that it was credited to nobody -- not to me or Alamy.

 

However, I dug up the the online version and the image was credited to "Alamy" alone. It's a real mixed bag, as Phillipe says.

Edited by John Mitchell
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Last year, I came across an image (direct sale via Alamy) in the prestigious (?) "The Economist" magazine and was surprised to see that it was credited to nobody -- not to me or Alamy.

 

However, I dug up the the online version and the image was credited to "Alamy" alone. It's a real mixed bag, as Phillipe says.

 

The Economist doesn't credit anyone, not even its writers. That has been a long standing policy I believe, must check it is still the case.

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Last year, I came across an image (direct sale via Alamy) in the prestigious (?) "The Economist" magazine and was surprised to see that it was credited to nobody -- not to me or Alamy.

 

However, I dug up the the online version and the image was credited to "Alamy" alone. It's a real mixed bag, as Phillipe says.

 

The Economist doesn't credit anyone, not even its writers. That has been a long standing policy I believe, must check it is still the case.

 

 

Yes, that still seems to be case. I guess that economists want to stay anonymous. Can't say as I blame them given the general inaccuracy of their predictions. B)

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Gemma, maybe you'll find some answer here.

 

In my country not giving the author's credit info is breaking the law, it's just agains your rights and can be gained by lawyers. Every photographer has the right to be named under image and the publisher may not give credit info only IF the photographer says to not give it - it's up to photographer if he wants to be anonymous author. The premiss is that credit info MUST be attached with the image in publication. Agencies like Alamy should take more care and focus on that problem as they are medium who sells our work.

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BAPLA in the UK tried to get agencies to enforce credit lines back in film days and five minutes later..... same old story. Charges for leaving out credit lines were part of licensing back in the day but as competition grew and more mags especially wanted to keep the graphics on a page much cleaner, you ended up where we are.

 

If you think that agencies have any power in the market today...........

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