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Do you upload to Alamy and micro sites or just Alamy?


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I've been selling on stock sites -  Alamy plus a couple of micros - for 12 months now.  I tend to favour Alamy with more editorial type photos, but quite a lot of my images are on all 3 sites.  Fairly frequently I see an image zoomed on Alamy and then sold the same day on a micro site for a few cents as it obviously makes sense from a buyers point of view to buy as cheaply as possible if they have time to check.

 

I just can't decide what to do.  Whether to continue as I am, or focus just on Alamy.  At the moment I'm earning slightly less from Alamy than the micros, but this might change if the same photos weren't available on micro.  It's also time consuming uploading to more than one site.

 

I was just wondering what the split was on here if you don't mind sharing - just Alamy or Alamy plus micro?

 

Thanks

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Be prepared for a lot of people telling you to abandon the micros.

If customers know the same pictures are available on two or more sites for very different prices, of course they will get the cheapest price they can.

The fact they are searching on Alamy first to find the image they want and THEN checking the micros suggests that like what is available on Alamy. If the find an image they want and can't find it cheaper elsewhere, they may well be willing to pay the Alamy price.

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Been discussed many times - and not only here.  You can do a search on this forum for previous threads to upturn all (varied) views, but the one common opinion you will find throughout (as Phil and Martin have said, above) is that it is pretty pointless to compete with yourself.

 

There are many here who submit to both types of stock sites, but they tend to be very selective about what they submit where, and they tend not to offer the same images at two sites where one undercuts the other.

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Alamy and many other libraries worldwide (specialists as well as other RM generalists) but certainly NOT microstock.

Kay, you're cutting your own throat  :huh:

 

Cheers,

Philippe

thanks Philippe and everyone - I think I probably knew this really.  When this started out as a hobby it was just so exciting to see sales and usage (even for 25c).  Now I'm beginning to think "what am I doing?"  Decision made - no duplications.  Alamy only from now on.  Less time tagging, more time taking photos  :D

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OP, I was about to post this but you've just worked it out. Good for you.

Having the same images on A and MS isn't like having similar goods in different packaging at Selfridges and Tesco (or Walmart, or whatever). Those markets don't overlap; Selfridges customers don't say, 'hang on a minute, I'll just pop to Tesco and see if it's a bit cheaper'.

But your MS clients just click through and pay 25p instead of £25.

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I've seen no evidence that having the same work, if allowed, on micros in any way hurts Alamy sales. If you look at the licenses, you would see that a lot of Alamy's core clients would need to use Enhanced plans to buy images so the 25 cents mantra goes out the window.

 

Just checked and 3 of 7 sales today are also available on micro... available that is if client has an account, has the time to search, has the right micro, has clearance to open an new account, has a calculator to work out if spending the money on a bulk subscription will actually save money on that sale.... it's a little more complicated than it might seem.

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Alamy is the closest thing to a micro I have been using, but the way things are going will have to consider that option. One thing it will do is subsidise CGI work. A complicated CGI can have a lot of easily realised spin-offs. In fact I have already gone past stage 1 of applying for ...

 

(clue: Obergruppenführer)

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I use Alamy and one other traditional agency.

 

One thing I don't do in my work process is duplicate images between agencies. But I will cover a subject by a variety of viewpoints, angles, interpretation, etc. to make the best use of my time and enable me to submit different work between agencies. Seems to work for me!

 

Jim. :) 

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The advice you are receiving in this thread is well meaning and may be correct, but it is only one viewpoint. Look for other viewpoints elsewhere. Take all viewpoints with a grain of salt, and then do what you think is right for you.

 
If micros make sense to you, then go with micros. You are under no obligation to play the rules of the photographic game, rules set by your competition. Photography is changing constantly, so rules are fluid.
 
In the distant past I have had all of the following bad advice from various experienced well intentioned industry people.
 
From an assignment photographer: “Don’t shoot stock as you are ruining the assignment business.”
 
From a Stock Agency president who’s holdings were 95% black and white prints: Colour stock will never catch on because transparencies are impossible to duplicate”
 
From a top stock photographer: “Transparencies are impossible to duplicate. Shoot 36 in camera dupes of each and every picture, so you can service multiple agents”.
 
From a Kodak rep who was trying to sell Kodak colour printing paper: “Colour prints are the only way to go. Kodachrome is an amateur film”
 
From a top RM stock photographer: “Do not allow your stock images to be sold as RF because you are ruining the stock RM business”.
 
From a top stock photographer who failed to realize that 50% of nothing was nothing: “Do not accept a 40% commission because I will accept no less than 50%.”
 
From a top stock photographer just before he lost most of his representations, and a lot of original transparencies, due to industry consolidation causing his foreign agencies to shut down: “Never allow a big agency to represent you internationally. Make separate direct deals in each and every country”
 
From all photographers until they bought their own computers: “Do not use photoshop because you are not playing the photographic game our way, and we consider it cheating”
 
From both a Kodak rep as well as the owner of an E6 processing lab: “digital will never replace film”
 
Last week, just before it was rumored that Corbus is being broken up: “Corbus is the only way to go”
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I'm not a fan of micros either, and submitting the same images (RF of course) to both Alamy and micros sounds like trying to mix oil with water.

 

However, having two separate portfolios -- one for Alamy and one for micros --  seems to work very well for some photographers.

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The advice you are receiving in this thread is well meaning and may be correct, but it is only one viewpoint. Look for other viewpoints elsewhere. Take all viewpoints with a grain of salt, and then do what you think is right for you.

 
If micros make sense to you, then go with micros. You are under no obligation to play the rules of the photographic game, rules set by your competition. Photography is changing constantly, so rules are fluid.
 
In the distant past I have had all of the following bad advice from various experienced well intentioned industry people.
 
From an assignment photographer: “Don’t shoot stock as you are ruining the assignment business.”
 
From a Stock Agency president who’s holdings were 95% black and white prints: Colour stock will never catch on because transparencies are impossible to duplicate”
 
From a top stock photographer: “Transparencies are impossible to duplicate. Shoot 36 in camera dupes of each and every picture, so you can service multiple agents”.
 
From a Kodak rep who was trying to sell Kodak colour printing paper: “Colour prints are the only way to go. Kodachrome is an amateur film”
 
From a top RM stock photographer: “Do not allow your stock images to be sold as RF because you are ruining the stock RM business”.
 
From a top stock photographer who failed to realize that 50% of nothing was nothing: “Do not accept a 40% commission because I will accept no less than 50%.”
 
From a top stock photographer just before he lost most of his representations, and a lot of original transparencies, due to industry consolidation causing his foreign agencies to shut down: “Never allow a big agency to represent you internationally. Make separate direct deals in each and every country”
 
From all photographers until they bought their own computers: “Do not use photoshop because you are not playing the photographic game our way, and we consider it cheating”
 
From both a Kodak rep as well as the owner of an E6 processing lab: “digital will never replace film”
 
Last week, just before it was rumored that Corbus is being broken up: “Corbus is the only way to go”

 

 

... and all of them were absolutely correct in their own view and for what they wanted and believed. 

 

I tend to say "A decision becomes the right decision as soon as one takes it" - That is no matter what! 

Agree everybody should form their own view based on available information, two people will often conclude two different results. 

 

For the topic - I am on Alamy only - mainly because I hate doing the same work twice, as in uploading and key wording. 

I plan to keep it this way, despite the incredible 6$ I earned since I started last October - I still hope this may go up eventually.

For that my portfolio needs to be less Cambodia focused - which currently is about 80% of my pictures. 

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Thank you for all your help and opinions.  As a relative newbie to the stock business, I think what I've learned is that there probably isn't a perfect way.  It seems logical not to duplicate images with micro sites as buyers are likely to just chose the cheapest option (but having said that I've made several sales on here when the same image is on a micro site, but how many have I lost??). 

 

Having thought some more about it, my approach will be to focus on Alamy from now on, but still to upload to micro sites when I think it's a picture that might appeal more to the micro market - blogs, small businesses etc.  I've been spending far too much time keywording images duplicating across sites, and it would be nice to be able to spend more of my time actually taking photos!!

 

Thanks again, Kay

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:D  :D  :D  Just had a sale for $144 for an image that was rejected by micro for being too soft!!!  :D  :D  :D

 

haven't you just answered your own question

and not just for the rejection by micro-but how many licenses would you need to reap $144 

 

Indeed - made me laugh!

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Also to avoid people even starting to look at micros to check your images is to just put your photos as RM. RM means standard that your photo is not on micros.

 

Anyway for example yesterday i had a sale of 220 dollars of a simpe close up photo of a grid fence that is also on micros. It never sold on the micros.

 

 

Mirco

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I put most of my better images on Alamy and other small traditional agencies, but I have a small portfolio on four of the micros and feel that given the wide range of prices even here on Alamy, that makes sense for me. Last year one of the micros licensed an image of mine for $750, netting me $375, and I've earned a few other 3-figure sums on the micros for a single image license, though the bulk of licenses there are for less, but daily licenses add up. I have a handful of the same RF images on Alamy and the micros but for the most part have kept them separate. There are some newer edited traditional agencies that only license RF and don't require exclusivity, so I have several RF images on those and Alamy that are NOT on any of the micros. 

 

I have experienced situations where a zoom on Alamy was then licensed on a micro, as well as situations where a top seller on the micros was also licensed on Alamy. Some buyers will search for the lowest price and others won't so you really need to decide what works best for you. I hate the idea of getting pennies for a license, but they add up and for certain types of images, micro agencies make sense for me but I wouldn't put my entire portfolio on any of them. 

 

On the other hand, trying to decide which images should go where certainly slows down my uploading process, as do the different keywording and caption requirements so in that sense, just uploading to Alamy would simplify things.

 

It seems like the OP has made her decision. We all need to decide what works best for us based on what we shoot and how well it sells. 

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Also we should not forget that Alamy has many distributors. So for them that only upload to Alamy they also win time having their photos automatically on other agencies around the world.

 

In my case i just heard from Polish agency BEW Agencja that all Alamy images will be included and searchable on their website. This is great for me since i have many Polish subjects. So it is a one time uploading and available on many places. Every decision has his advantages. It is just wich advantages fits you best.

 

Mirco

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