Jump to content

Recommended Posts

 

Long live big DSLRs :-)

 

 

Yep.

 

Alan

 

 

Uh-oh, I sold mine two years ago. Guess that leaves me locked out in the cold.

 

Perhaps I can find a plastic housing that looks like a humongous DSLR. I could then put my small mirrorless camera inside it. Either that or I could buy the pricey new Nikon discussed in another thread and remove the innards. Where there's a will, there's a way...

 

Update: This isn't quite what I had in mind, but it might work. No doubt it would open doors.

Edited by John Mitchell
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Totally agree with what everyone's said. 

 

In addition to this, don't underestimate the power of the press card and a good website. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you for your thoughts, ladies and gentlemen. Very interesting indeed.  :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A very interesting and thought provoking thread!

 

I can see how a large impressive camera/kit could help unlock doors, but conversely, a small camera that fits into your pocket gives access to subject matter that you happen to stumble upon.

 

On two consecutive weeks I had to travel into town and, despite lousy light, decided to carry a small camera. On each occasion I was able to take and upload viable Live News shots, one of which sold.

 

OK 9 out of 10 times you come back with nothing worthwhile, but always carry a (small) camera!

Edited by Bryan
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A very interesting and thought provoking thread!

 

I can see how a large impressive camera/kit could help unlock doors, but conversely, a small camera that fits into your pocket gives access to subject matter that you happen to stumble upon.

 

On two consecutive weeks I had to travel into town and, despite lousy light, decided to carry a small camera. On each occasion I was able to take and upload viable Live News shots, one of which sold.

 

OK 9 out of 10 times you come back with nothing worthwhile, but always carry a (small) camera!

I always carry my camera (a big DSLR) in my bag. It is better to have it with you and get nothing than not have it with you and miss that perfect picture! ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ever since day one of stock-photography, 1992, I have used my clients access! tons of commissioned work, mutual client/photographer trust, etc have opened places which are normally closed for most people. Everything from industrial-sites, medicine/surgery, nuclear, aircraft and car production-plants, etc.etc.

 

Its a matter of I scratch their backs and they scratch mine. I cut my dayrate by 20% and in return I can take pics at carte-blanche, with all releases.

 

Thats my setup!

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

A very interesting and thought provoking thread!

 

I can see how a large impressive camera/kit could help unlock doors, but conversely, a small camera that fits into your pocket gives access to subject matter that you happen to stumble upon.

 

On two consecutive weeks I had to travel into town and, despite lousy light, decided to carry a small camera. On each occasion I was able to take and upload viable Live News shots, one of which sold.

 

OK 9 out of 10 times you come back with nothing worthwhile, but always carry a (small) camera!

 

I carry my Fuji X-T1  99% of the time I am out. I would never do that with my Canon 1Ds3 - just too big and heavy.

 

Actually I think the way you work may have also an influence on how officials view you, whatever camera you use.

Edited by Martin P Wilson

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Access may be important to some, but remember that still-lifes are a major chunk of the stock photography universe and they require no access at all.

That is certainly true for straight run-of-the-mill still lifes. For shoots involved specialized subjects, access may mean access to the props and/or the knowledge of where to get them. Couple that with the knowledge of the market that needs those specialized shots, specialized knowledge about how to setup the props and how to shoot them. "Specialized" could be anything you have a passion for (or a special knowledge of), provided there is a market for that specialized thing.

 

My 2c

 

GI

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a Mastercard if that helps... didn't they buy out Access (your flexible friend)? (yes.. bad joke which you probably have to be British (or lived here 30 years or so ago) to get).

 

Jokes aside.. this is the thing I like about Stockimo. I rarely have my camera with me on a day-to-day basis but I always have my iPhone.. so when I find myself on a business trip into London like yesterday... There's pictures to be taken everywhere in every day life if you hava camera with you and can spot them.. so I'd say we all have access.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Access is the basic part.  Knowing how to use the

access and being a good journalist is what makes

the difference in the long run.

 

Did I say Sean Penn.....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Access may be important to some, but remember that still-lifes are a major chunk of the stock photography universe and they require no access at all.

 

 

I was going to let this go, but since you are the only one who seems to have totally misunderstood the point, and then you repeated your confusion in your comments to a newbie, I'll try to explain.

 

Access can be meaningful and helpful on a lots of levels, as I said in the OP.

 

With regard to still life images, do your subjects just fall from the sky onto your tabletop? Or do you have to aquire them in some way? Do you not buy the food and other items you shoot? Do you borrow them? Or maybe you dig stuff out of a basement? All and any of that is access. Get it? 

  • Upvote 2
  • Downvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Philippe said: Little tip: shoot with your biggest camera and a 70-200/2.8 (among other lenses) do NOT use a Sony RX100   ^_^

 

A couple years ago I paid my usual few dollars to get into the big county fair. I was standing in turn 1 of the horse races and shooting away at the trotters and pacers (harness racing). Some of these shots do appear on Alamy. The starting gate truck had started a race and came to a stop at the outside of the track near my fence. I was slightly miffed that I lost a few shots with my Canon DSLR and fancy big white lens. That was until the starter guy on the truck yelled and asked if I wanted to ride the truck for a race and take a few pics. I about lost my britches trying to untangle the tripod hanging on my belt so I could run to the truck. My assistant (wife) took care of the kit while I got a fun ride with a camera.

 

There are times when a big kit is useful and there are times a smaller "hidden" kit is useful.

 

Yep! When I returned from a trip to Scotland, I was shooting the container terminal with my 70-200 as the ferry entered the Zeebrugge port. Suddenly a voice above me invited me to come up 'cause the view was much better. And indeed. A few seconds later, I was standing next to a very kind officer on the top deck prohibited for the "plebs" -_-  

 

BMFFA8.jpg   BMFF02.jpg

 

Cheers,

Philippe

 

Hey Philippe!  you can't just come here and show container industry, thats one of my domains :D I love ports and their activities! :) If you are ever in Gothenburg, Rotterdam or Hong-Kong, give me a shout, I know the port chief-officers very well and they will let you in!

Edited by christian58

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Did I say Sean Penn.....

 

. . . I certainly hope not.

 

dd

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, please. Access to a number of towers and tall buildings in Copenhagen would be nice. Preparation and applying/asking/planning may be the way to do it, but I am quite impulsive when I can see the weather and time of day is right.

Edited by Niels Quist

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Access may be important to some, but remember that still-lifes are a major chunk of the stock photography universe and they require no access at all.

 

 

I was going to let this go, but since you are the only one who seems to have totally misunderstood the point, and then you repeated your confusion in your comments to a newbie, I'll try to explain.

 

Access can be meaningful and helpful on a lots of levels, as I said in the OP.

 

With regard to still life images, do your subjects just fall from the sky onto your tabletop? Or do you have to aquire them in some way? Do you not buy the food and other items you shoot? Do you borrow them? Or maybe you dig stuff out of a basement? All and any of that is access. Get it? 

 

Exactly - a lot of my sales come from studio stuff, but tend to be of things most people don't have access to. Foreign books, ancient Indian coins, medals, my dad's stamp collection... 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Access may be important to some, but remember that still-lifes are a major chunk of the stock photography universe and they require no access at all.

 

 

I was going to let this go, but since you are the only one who seems to have totally misunderstood the point, and then you repeated your confusion in your comments to a newbie, I'll try to explain.

 

Access can be meaningful and helpful on a lots of levels, as I said in the OP.

 

With regard to still life images, do your subjects just fall from the sky onto your tabletop? Or do you have to aquire them in some way? Do you not buy the food and other items you shoot? Do you borrow them? Or maybe you dig stuff out of a basement? All and any of that is access. Get it? 

 

Ed, you should have let it go ... I completely understand your point ... and I completely disagree with it.

  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Looking at Brian Yarvin’s Alamy portfolio I am sure he gets Edo’s point. I agree with Brian. A modestly equipped studio space, and his good mind, will give Brian access to all kinds of new possibilities, in addition to Brian’s location shots.

 
As I look at street photographers portfolios of London, or New York, or Toronto or any other city, I see a lot of timid grab shots taken surreptitiously in the street with a small spy camera, with a lens set to the telephoto end. Millions of these type of shots already available, so whats the point?
 
Street photographers would produce something great if they switched to a big wide angle camera, were brave enough to make a real connection to their subject, and got inside off the street. After all, a city is mainly inside.
 
Getting inside requires access and to get access you require 3 things. (1) Bravery to walk in and take images without permission, (2) the good sense to apologize if challenged, and (3) the ability to make a real human connection with your subject matter, or the person challenging your right to take images. #3 is the most important ability in all photography. A security guard is a human being. If you can make a human to human connection, rather than try to win the argument, maybe you can get permission to take the guard’s portrait.
 
I have a friend, an ex staff newspaper photographer, who makes a living by mainly working on assignment for news agencies, and taking the occasional stock photo. He is a 6 foot tall, trim individual, with a full size big camera equipped with a big wide angle zoom lens. He makes no secret, that he is taking strangers pictures. They let him do it because, after years of practice, he is so charming.
 
The last time we had lunch, he walked in and placed his humongous camera on the table. Smiled at the entire restaurant, charmed the wait staff, and charmed the people at the nearby tables. He engaged people in conversation. He made human connections. He left with some stock photos. As a caution to everyone, he has been assaulted in the past, but only once in a lifetime of taking images of strangers.
 
In studio portraiture you may think you may have access to the subject, but you only have access to a false face that they want to present to the world. If you make a human to human connection then they relax, and you get real access to the real person behind the mask.
 
Access goes beyond privacy of place or person. You may be on the forbidden spot with the forbidden person but you do not have access, or a great photograph, until you and the subject matter make a real connection.
  • Upvote 7

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Looking at Brian Yarvin’s Alamy portfolio I am sure he gets Edo’s point. I agree with Brian. A modestly equipped studio space, and his good mind, will give Brian access to all kinds of new possibilities, in addition to Brian’s location shots.

 

Thank you for the kind words Bill. I can only wish for the kind of charm your friend has - that story was very entertaining.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I remember going to a splash pad in downtown Oklahoma City, a tourist area, when I had just gotten into serious photography. In fact, I was shooting my first SLR camera, a Nikon film camera. (N70?, N80?)

I sat down on a ledge with parents, cradling the camera. Next to me, the parents had a beautiful baby boy of about 16 months. He was timidly sneaking closer and closer to the water fountains, first a finger, then a hand.

 

He was so cute, and I told the parents how cute he was. I laughed with delight at his every cute move. And my reaction to this child was honest. The parents saw that. Next thing you know I asked permission to photograph him and got it. I do think women can pull this off better than men, for the obvious reason.

 

Of course, my pictures were crap. Without the digital feedback I got when I got my first DSLR 8 months later, I couldn't correct what I was doing wrong on the fly.

I learned more in the first month of digital than I did in 8 months of film. Oh, I learned, just at a much slower rate.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes Betty you received permission to photograph the child, because you made a genuine human connection with the parents.

 
I agree with you about women. My wife sometimes travels with me and she is much better than I am in genuinely chatting people up and making connections in all circumstances. She seems to be able to diffuse any anxiety about my taking pictures. We have a restaurant routine where I say to her “If you have finished chatting up the waiter, I would like to order now.”
 
We should keep in mind that when we take the trouble to single out and photograph someone or something, we are being complimentary. We are saying that we find you or your property interesting. We are conferring status. Once you make that connection, and they realize you are not a voyeur, they like the experience.
 
Philippe as to the Bruce Gilden NYC video, notice that he is picking out old defenseless people. I see a lot of strong tough looking people, that might punch him in the face, being ignored. A kind of bullying I think. If you look at the images, there is no connection or insight with the person at all. They look mostly startled or harassed. Compare Gilden’s shots to Eliot Erwitt’s here.
 
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Yes Betty you received permission to photograph the child, because you made a genuine human connection with the parents.

 
I agree with you about women. My wife sometimes travels with me and she is much better than I am in genuinely chatting people up and making connections in all circumstances. She seems to be able to diffuse any anxiety about my taking pictures. We have a restaurant routine where I say to her “If you have finished chatting up the waiter, I would like to order now.”
 
We should keep in mind that when we take the trouble to single out and photograph someone or something, we are being complimentary. We are saying that we find you or your property interesting. We are conferring status. Once you make that connection, and they realize you are not a voyeur, they like the experience.
 
Philippe as to the Bruce Gilden NYC video, notice that he is picking out old defenseless people. I see a lot of strong tough looking people, that might punch him in the face, being ignored. A kind of bullying I think. If you look at the images, there is no connection or insight with the person at all. They look mostly startled or harassed. Compare Gilden’s shots to Eliot Erwitt’s here.
 

 

 

That's a great Website, btw.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Access to places is one thing, getting the stuff sold is another. Today is a different world. You can have a portfolio like Pete-Turner, Maisel, LaChapelle, Webber, Demarchelier, etc. etc from some of the worlds highest paid photographers.

Their portfolios like everybody elses just gets buried alive by some 300 million other images on the "celebrated" Internet.

 

Mark Getty once said to me and a few other photographers who had gathered. This will last for about 20 years plus a little, thats the time-span we are looking at. then the entire universe will be swamped with pictures.

 

The day the biggest agencies and outlets wake up and realize that quality goes before quantity. Thats the day of a new era. Until then its just a matter of simply producing quantity, regardless of quality. For the moment we are extremely lucky!! since most buyers don't expect quality for rock-bottom prices.

 

Access will get you the pictures, sure! the question is what to do with the pictures.

  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"A modestly equipped studio space, and his good mind, will give Brian access to all kinds of new possibilities," Bill Brooks

 

And isn't that exactly what I'm saying? 

 

". . . access. I mean all kinds of access." - me in my OP

  • Upvote 1
  • Downvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Here in Oklahoma, we have a lot of ice storms. Used to be a rare thing, but for the past 15-20 years, they seem to be a winter norm. Thousands lose power in the state each time, sometimes for a week or more. Our city is still neck deep in broken tree limbs from our Thanksgiving weekend ice storm, with more added from the Christmas one.

We had a large ash tree in the back yard. The limbs seemed brittle and one limb came down in the Thanksgiving ice, but away from the wires. The wires servicing our home came right through the limbs. To say I was nervous put it mildly.

I hired a crew the first week of January to remove our tree and grind the stump. 8 men showed up, and in 2 1/2 hours, the tree was down, stump ground, cleanup complete, and a bonus of a nice pile of firewood to burn if a major power outage should hit our part of the city.

Guess who had "access" to images of the crew at work?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"A modestly equipped studio space, and his good mind, will give Brian access to all kinds of new possibilities," Bill Brooks

 

And isn't that exactly what I'm saying? 

 

". . . access. I mean all kinds of access." - me in my OP

I understand that Ed ... it's just that I see things differently.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.