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Kenny J

Still lifes and white backgrounds

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In the process of keywording some light-tent shots and notice many of my BG's have a slight bluish tint. I remember doing that on purpose, but after looking on Alamy, I wonder if this is a mistake. What shade of white should one use? I never want an all white, I like having a touch of shading. Is there anyway to exchange a re-edited image, or should one just delete and resubmit?

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Re-edit and reupload - when having passed QC do the key wording - add the image id of the former image to the secondary key words - and ask Member Services to erase the old image. They usually do if you submit an improved image and let them know both image ids.

Edited by Niels Quist

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These images are not yet key worded, and not on sale. On the keywording page there is a delete button. Wondering if it would be easier to just delete, re-edit, and submit anew. Is there a standard for whiteness that customers prefer? Would a blue white discourage sales? These shots are of heirloom tomatoes, and as I adjust color differently depending on image, it affects the BG tint. So I added a touch of blue to over warm shots.

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I don't have any RAW images in front of me right now that I could open, however, I'm guessing you have to aim for: 0, 0, 0 - or is it 255, 255, 255?

 

Make sure to keyword "cut out" as well. 

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Oh, yes... Have a go at that - it would be easier. Don't quite know when this possibility ends - if it is when the image enters the ready bin awaiting the server update or you have a chance before they are on sale... But do try....

Edited by Niels Quist

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Well, Robert, that is a part of my question I guess. What sells best, cut-out ready or naturally shaded? Brings up another point. Is there anyway on Alamy to tell how well a photo has sold, would help to know what works for others.

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Of course your own sales are reported, but you can't get access to anyone else's sales data, you'd have to Google image search.

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There is more chance of a buyer seeing your images if they show when the cut outs filter is ticked on a search.

 

Heirloom tomatoes gives 1819 with the cut out filter it reduces to 101

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I notice that many that show as cutouts still have shading around the bottom, and some even the in the  upper areas that didn't go even white, so I think mine are good. Not many are pure white. So I will re-edit to get a whiter white, sans the blue tint, but not worry about the shadows that I do like. Thanx.

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Pure white is 255,255,255 when you check it in PS and 100,100,100 if checking in LR. In PS I always check with an extremely narrow levels adjustment layer with lowered transparency (85-90%) that there aren't any strays (invisible) anywhere as a last step. Isolations are easiest done with the pen tool.

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I believe you can have shading so long as it does not reach the edge of the frame. That is pure whit all round.

 

But I may be mistaken. Others know better.

 

Allan

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Anything other than white will work against you. When a client buys a cutout he usually wants just the subject of the image floating on a white page.

 
If there is some ghost density detail in the background around the edges of the printed image, then he will curse you and Alamy endlessly. 
 
Pure white around the subject, but nothing wrong with a small obvious shadow as long as the shadow does not touch the edge of the image.
 
usa-flag-E5YDN0.jpg

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Ok, so back to the drawing board. These tomato shots are all on small glass dinner plates, some by themselves, some with other things like a pepper or garlic. I originally made these as possible use on a web site, which fell through, and secondarily as wall art candidates. Whiting them out would not be that difficult, I have gotten good at that. I already resubmitted them but can delete them all again if I decide to. I assume whited out images are used by customers to make their own composites or add their own BG. Would alamy accept the same image twice, one whited out and one not? The shots I have are named varieties, and some quite beautiful, not just a generic tomato on a plate.

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I believe you can have shading so long as it does not reach the edge of the frame. That is pure whit all round.

 

But I may be mistaken. Others know better.

 

Allan

That's been my experience, even if you have cut out in the keywords your shots won't be found as cut outs unless there is a clear white border all of the way round. Indeed it needs to be reasonably generous.

 

Algorithm might have changed recently, bit that was certainly the case last time I got caught out.

Edited by Bryan

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