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York Photographer

Yikes! How long has Stills Photography got left?

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This has been on the cards for a while

 

 

How long before there is an 8k version in a phone?

 

Why would you shoot stills?

 

Sports, Weddings, PR, Press, Portraits etc etc will all be frame grabs before long, and lots of stills uses will be replaced with short clips.

 

Then the deskilling of the profession will be complete!

Edited by York Photographer

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I must admit that I already use stills from from my family HD videos.  Much greater chance of a group all having a good expression at the same time without having to revert to PS.  With Adobe Premiere I can just 'jog' through the timeline and it will save an acceptable jpeg straight to file.  Not good enough for Alamy but perfect for web and small prints.

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Amateur Photographer magazine here in the UK used a 4K frame grab on its front cover as part of an experiment and discussion on the subject earlier this year (I think). As I recall it was essentially a studio (head?) shot so not a moving subject.

 

What shutter speed can 4K video use?

Edited by Martin P Wilson

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I would add that despite predictions; photography did not kill painting, tv did not kill radio or the movies, and no doubt there are many others.

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I think that big sporting events will roll the photographic rights in with the TV rights before long, and they'll control the stills distribution along with the TV.

 

As far as I can see the shutter speed is the frame rate, I think that from what I've read 8k uses a 100 frames per second, but I'm sure that they can also use a super slow motion rate of 1000f/s

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This is something that has struck me as a possibility for a lot of sports photography where the technology is present, especially the big events.

 

Photographers aren;t exactly the most popular presence for organisers and this would give them the opportunity to give them the red card. It also gives them control over the imagery.

 

There is the question of freedom of the press...

 

Event organisers and the sports associations already have a lot of control of the images - think IOC going after sales by unaccredited photographers (happened here at Alamy). The terms of most accreditations are strict, usually editorial only, and in any case the top end sports are largely dominated by one or two agencies (look at the bylines) - top end motor racing, for example, is almost exclusively LAT. The individual freelance and other agencies will only get the crumbs from their table.

 

It is one of the reasons I have pretty much given up on shooting sport.

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I'm not a video expert but one problem I see is the shutter speed.  My understanding is that for PAL, 25 frames a second, you don't want to go over 1/50th shutter speed or the motion doesn't look smooth.  For stills, 1/50th wont freeze motion.  So maybe doing both at the same time for professional purposes wont be that easy?

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I'm not a video expert but one problem I see is the shutter speed.  My understanding is that for PAL, 25 frames a second, you don't want to go over 1/50th shutter speed or the motion doesn't look smooth.  For stills, 1/50th wont freeze motion.  So maybe doing both at the same time for professional purposes wont be that easy?

That's right. It's not really compatible with fast action. Video at standard speed at 1/1000sec would give you a headache.

Edited by spacecadet

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Nah!  no matter what crap they come out with or which stupid telephone thingy. The dslr will always be around and used. We are talking stock, right. Outside the world of stock there is a whole world of commercial and assignment photography demanding far superior equipment ( well not editorial maybe )

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Will the demise of still photography occur before or after the long-predicted (yawn) demise of the dslr by plenoptic cameras?

 

dd

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I'm not a video expert but one problem I see is the shutter speed.  My understanding is that for PAL, 25 frames a second, you don't want to go over 1/50th shutter speed or the motion doesn't look smooth.  For stills, 1/50th wont freeze motion.  So maybe doing both at the same time for professional purposes wont be that easy?

That's right. It's not really compatible with fast action. Video at standard speed at 1/1000sec would give you a headache.

 

 

That was my thought when I asked the question.

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The same technology allows post focussing. See here.

 

Also with focus stacking will allow total manipulation of depth of focus.

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York- To the best of my knowledge, 4k cameras under $5,000 (£3322.33) can shoot super slow motion, but not at 4k. The best they can do now is 720p. For instance, the Canon XC 10 can do 120 fps at 720 p, and so can the Sony AX 100. So, super slow motion, which is stunning of course, is still only possible at HD quality, unless you go to the high end, like the Red Epic at three times the cost. In a year or two this will likely change, so we'll have full 4k or better in super slow motion and the ability to capture quality stills in real time as the video is running. If anyone knows of an existing camera that can shoot 120 fps at 4k, please tell us about it here!

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