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I've spent scads of time over 3 days trying to ID this flower. It came up volunteer in a bed where I have honeysuckle growing and has been blooming here in Oklahoma City, Oklahoma for about 4-6 weeks.  The plant is scraggly bushy on stems that kind of go ever which way, and is about 3-4 feet high and full of these yellow blooms. The leaves are serrate and the flowers are two inches across.

 

The nearest I can find that looks like these are Camphorweed, one of the varieties.  Yet I can't find any that have leaves that look like mine, and when I crush a leaf, it doesn't have the camphor odor.  When I first saw the flowers, they reminded me of Coreopsis. But none of those fit, either.  It's really quite attractive and butterflies love it.

 

I'm stumped. I want to upload these images, but can't do it with keywords of "yellow wildflower"

 

https://www.dropbox.com/home/Betty?preview=_BAL0734-

 

https://www.dropbox.com/s/41hapsy45eik36t/_BAL0737-flower.jpg?dl=0

Edited by Betty LaRue

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Sometimes a Google picture search works and throws up similar photos of the same flower. That would be another link to follow. 

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Cannot see enough of the flower and plant - and the first Dropbox image doesn't work. My original idea goes towards Hieracium - perhaps Hieracium umbellatum, Hieracium  murorum or another guess Picris hieracioides, but not sure, partly because I am not a flower-man, secondly because essential distinctive marks are missing on the image.

 

 

PS Never leave a photographed tree, plant or mushroom / fungus without detailed photos/information on every aspect of the item to be able to look it up or ask for help later on.

For fungi that also includes colour of gills or tubes and spores, information on annulus (ring), stalk, and remnants of volva / velum (the sack-like layer at the bottom) . Tenderness of hat and stalk, and colour of moisture that can be pressed out of these.

 

Edited: Just reread your description. The inflorescence of the above will probably not reach your 2 inches ...

Edited by Niels Quist
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No expert, but a Google image search throws up a few.....Golden Ragwort? Packera aurea.

 

 

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I'm with Philippe, Heliopsis looks like a good fit. This is from a notoriously large and difficult family of plants (the Asteraceae), and considering it could be a cultivar, or a hybrid (as many cultivated flowers are), or even the offspring of a hybrid (which wouldn't exactly resemble the parent species), it may not be possible to identify it to species.

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OMG, <dancing around the room>  Heliiopsis helianthoides looks an exact match to me!!

 

Philippe, you de man!    :lol:

 

I usually spend days trying to search for answers, and only turn to the forum when I fail.  I went through every...single...yellow....wildflower on Alamy.  I searched Wiki.  I searched Oklahoma wildflowers.  I searched nurseries.  And did random searches of "yellow wildflower" yellow wildflowers, serrate leaves, yellow flowers with serrate leaves, you name it, I searched it.

 

Phillippe, I thought to myself you'd probably be the one to figure it out, but I value everyone here who had suggestions and probably did some searching to help me.  Thank you all.

 

Betty

Edited by Betty LaRue

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