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I have asked about sizing before on this forum and everyone was really helpful.  I've passed QC and started to upload some images and am now working on bigger batches, but having had a look at some of the file sizes on the site this has brought up some new questions about sizing for me...which may just be down to a lack in confidence in posting images or it could be a senior moment :)

 

I have noticed that many of the images that appear on here are in the ball park size of 50MB with dimensions of around the 45x30cm size at 300dpi.  My images are coming out more around the 22MB size with dimensions of 30x20 cm at 3000dpi.  My images are taken on either a 5D mk2 or a Fuji Xpro so there's no issue with the uncompressed sizing initially.

 

My main question is should I be increasing the file dimensions from 30x20 to around 45x30 when converting the tif to a jpeg in CS6 for uploading? Generally do Alamy's clients look for the bigger MB sizes to work with?  Will the small file size whilst acceptable to Alamy limit people purchasing images?

 

I have had a look through the forum but I couldn't see answers there so any help or advice would be greatly appreciated.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Alamy used to require us to upsize images to around 50mb but they changed that years ago.  They now DON'T want images to be upsized.  You are also more likely to fail QC for soft and lacking definition if you interpolate so just leave them as they are.

 

Pearl

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Once upon a time there was a minimum size limit that required most contributors to upsize their offerings. The limit was substantially reduced and now the advice is not to upsize. Doing so may lead to QC failure due to SoLD.

 

I very rarely see customers searching using the File Size criterion, but it does happen.

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File size only matters significantly with RF images, for obvious reason.

 

A 5D Mk2 produces an uncropped file which is 60+MB, IIRC that equates to a 300dpi of 48cm on the long side. 5616 x 3744 pixels. If you are not cropping and getting these smaller pixel dimensions, remember jpegs are compressed so file on disc will show as much smaller, then look at your exporting from ACR.

Edited by Guest
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Thanks everyone for such fast responses - it's made my mind a lot clearer on what's going on with my old files. 

 

Geoff your comment about ACR exporting reminded me that I did have a problem with ACR a long time ago after an adobe update - it switched my settings to smaller file sizes...double checking it's my old images around that time that were affected.  I also realise that I have in the past used a 40D and that too will have smaller file sizes...so thank you for highlighting that for me...I think I was having one of those moments where I look at a problem for so long and miss the obvious answer staring me in the face!

 

Pearl and Bryan - thanks for the advice re upsizing - looking at upsized images it did look like they were slightly degraded, so now I know its definitely not an option!

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Since when did anyone use XXcm by at 300 DPI as a file size?

Pixels by at 300DPI is the proper way to state it.  For example

in the old news days the standard file for transmission was

3000 by at 300DPI.  DPI or PPI same thing.

 

Chuck

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Hi Chuck - I only used the size example as it appeared on the Alamy page using the cm measurement rather than quoting the pixels ratio as well to explain my question - just being a bit lazy really :) Thanks for your comment.

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