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Is it important that I use photo editing software on all of my pictures? I really prefer not to alter my pictures too much, if at all, because I want to show my abilities as a photographer, not a Photoshop artist. I understand that sometimes I will need to edit out blemishes/spots in the pictures, but from what I've heard, it sounds like if I don't do a lot of editing, I won't see many of my photos approved here. I submitted my first 3 30 hours ago and I am currently waiting for them to get out of QC, and I am afraid that they won't be approved.

 

So the real question here is: Am I going to see a lot of rejected photos if I only use editing software on a few of my pictures? I can send you one or two of my photos if that will help.

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Hi Nathan,

 

You have submitted your first three images? Your very first "test" submittance should consist of four images, no more no less, so assume your first four images have been accepted. Otherwise there may not happen anything before you have submitted exactly four images.

 

About photo editing - if you shoot in RAW as most photographers do, you will need some editing. If you shoot in JPG (as some do), you may need less editing - but you will lose a lot of possibilities.

 

You may be in for a steep learning curve.

 

Niels

Edited by Niels Quist
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The amount of editing/retouching required is a personal choice. It's up to you whether you subject your pix to a lot of digital manipulation, or a little, or none at all. QC is about specific technical requirements, itemised here: http://www.alamy.com/contributor/help/prepare-images.asp

 

So, yes, you'll need to clone out 'dust bunnies'. And, remember, your pix will be seen, at first, by customers, at thumbnail size, so they need to look good, even at that size.

 

BTW, Alamy ask for 4 images on first submission... not 3...

Edited by John Morrison

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...  but from what I've heard, it sounds like if I don't do a lot of editing, I won't see many of my photos approved here. 

 

...  not sure where you heard this. As a general rule the less manipulation you do the better chance you have of passing QC. Of course if you want to do "creative" stuff then that's a different thing. I don't know if it's been established how well that kind of thing sells against straight forward photography at Alamy. 

Edited by JohnB

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Contact MS (member services) and ask them to delete your submission then submit four of your best images.

 

Allan

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I normally edit 10-15 minutes per image (sometimes a lot longer

Apart from the general adjustments (removing dust bunnies, adjusting curves, get rid of CA, etc.) I also:

  • give the blue sky a nice natural looking "blue" without colour casts
  • give the grass a nice natural looking "green" instead of yellowish
  • bring back details in the shadows
  • bring back more detail in the highlights
  • straighten buildings
  • level horizons
  • make a more pleasing crop
  • clone out disturbing objects
  • reduce noise
  • blur backgrounds if needed to make images less "busy"
  • add more movement blur to unsharp people and cars due to subject movement
  • etc. etc. etc.

 

Cheers,

Philippe

 

From that I gather you do not do news/editorial items?

 

Allan

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Is it important that I use photo editing software on all of my pictures? I really prefer not to alter my pictures too much, if at all, because I want to show my abilities as a photographer, not a Photoshop artist. I understand that sometimes I will need to edit out blemishes/spots in the pictures, but from what I've heard, it sounds like if I don't do a lot of editing, I won't see many of my photos approved here. I submitted my first 3 30 hours ago and I am currently waiting for them to get out of QC, and I am afraid that they won't be approved.

 

So the real question here is: Am I going to see a lot of rejected photos if I only use editing software on a few of my pictures? I can send you one or two of my photos if that will help.

 

To be concrete. You will not get any rejection just because you did not do post processing. Its about the end result. If you can handle everything in-camera then go ahead.

 

Mirco

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I agree that thumbnails need to pop off the page. A LR preset does that for me.

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Is it important that I use photo editing software on all of my pictures? I really prefer not to alter my pictures too much, if at all, because I want to show my abilities as a photographer, not a Photoshop artist. I understand that sometimes I will need to edit out blemishes/spots in the pictures, but from what I've heard, it sounds like if I don't do a lot of editing, I won't see many of my photos approved here. I submitted my first 3 30 hours ago and I am currently waiting for them to get out of QC, and I am afraid that they won't be approved.

 

So the real question here is: Am I going to see a lot of rejected photos if I only use editing software on a few of my pictures? I can send you one or two of my photos if that will help.

To be concrete. You will not get any rejection just because you did not do post processing. Its about the end result. If you can handle everything in-camera then go ahead.

 

Mirco

 

It's all about attracting customers. Can a straight-from-the-camera image compete with what the competition (which usually took time to do some digital enhancements) has to offer?

Looking at images, I can tell who did their "homework" and who didn't and I'm pretty sure so can experienced picture researchers  ;) 

 

Cheers,

Philippe

 

Philippe,

 

You are a person with lots of experience and very great skills. Something what i don't have on that level as you so i totally agree to that what you say. No camera can compete with human. I just wanted to tell that it will be not a reason that Alamy will reject.

 

Mirco

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Alamy only reject for technical reasons not because of style.  However you should self edit on the criteria of what gives me the best advantage over my competitors? So if are shooting standard stock as JPG and not post processing then you losing a whole raft of possibilities to optimise your images. As you can see from above your competitors will be post processing to make their images the best.

 

Don't read the forums and believe it's all about uploading as much as you can. In the end it's about having the image the customer wants. If you were the customer you'd want the 'best' image file possible so that does mean a certain amount of post production.

 

Michael

Edited by Armstrong

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Is it important that I use photo editing software on all of my pictures? I really prefer not to alter my pictures too much, if at all, because I want to show my abilities as a photographer, not a Photoshop artist. I understand that sometimes I will need to edit out blemishes/spots in the pictures, but from what I've heard, it sounds like if I don't do a lot of editing, I won't see many of my photos approved here. I submitted my first 3 30 hours ago and I am currently waiting for them to get out of QC, and I am afraid that they won't be approved.

 

So the real question here is: Am I going to see a lot of rejected photos if I only use editing software on a few of my pictures? I can send you one or two of my photos if that will help.

To be concrete. You will not get any rejection just because you did not do post processing. Its about the end result. If you can handle everything in-camera then go ahead.

 

Mirco

 

It's all about attracting customers. Can a straight-from-the-camera image compete with what the competition (which usually took time to do some digital enhancements) has to offer?

Looking at images, I can tell who did their "homework" and who didn't and I'm pretty sure so can experienced picture researchers  ;) 

 

Cheers,

Philippe

 

 

No camera can compete with human. I just wanted to tell that it will be not a reason that Alamy will reject.

 

Mirco

 

 

That's very true. But shouldn't a stock photographer's aim be to surpass the competition? Not just passing QC. Remember, competition is very, very, very fierce  :huh:

B.t.w. everybody can level horizons and straighten buildings. All it takes is "time". Make time!   ^_^

 

Cheers,

Philippe 

 

Phillipe,

 

I get your point. And you are right. You just think always one step further. I just wanted to answer Nathan because he is afraid that his images will be not approved because he didnt use edit software. So i gave a simple answer. But you answer even better to add something to help Nathan having more sale chances. So i am not in conflict with your addition. I agree. I just dont make the time .....

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"I want to show my abilities as a photographer,". The only thing you should be thinking about the finished result.

If it needs a bit of editing, edit. No customer will care how much or little editing / tweeking has been done as long as the result is what they want.

Not all photos need photoshopping and some need very little but if it will make the image more sellable, do it.

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No camera can compete with human. I just wanted to tell that it will be not a reason that Alamy will reject.

 

Mirco

That's very true. But shouldn't a stock photographer's aim be to surpass the competition? Not just passing QC. Remember, competition is very, very, very fierce :huh:

B.t.w. everybody can level horizons and straighten buildings. All it takes is "time". Make time! ^_^

 

Cheers,

Philippe

 

Phillipe,

 

I get your point. And you are right. You just think always one step further. I just wanted to answer Nathan because he is afraid that his images will be not approved because he didnt use edit software. So i gave a simple answer. But you answer even better to add something to help Nathan having more sale chances. So i am not in conflict with your addition. I agree. I just dont make the time .....

 

Hey, I'm a Belgian and Belgians are ........... well you know, they invented the saxophone -_-

 

"I just dont make the time ....."

 

Make time! :angry: Sleep less! .... Post-process more! .... Learn the tricks of the trade! .... Work your butt off and buy the soundtrack album of "O Brother Where are Thou?" which makes perfect background music to keep you going during those looooong lonely hours (also when keywording) <_<

 

Cheers,

Philippe :P

 

 

I'd never have taken you for an Americana music guy Philippe but I love that music (and the movie is prety good too). If you want to really get movin, try the new Dwight Yoakam version of Man of Constant Sorrow :)

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Have to agree on your choice of music Philippe!

 

Back to the original post. I don't know what level of expertise/experience you have and I may be teaching gran how to suck eggs, but out of camera images rarely represent the scene as it actually was. A lot of my editing is to get back to what it was I believe I saw at the time.

 

As I understand it, even the cleverest of exposure meters essentially provide a mid grey point setting and you need to dial in additional or less exposure depending upon the make up of the scene, and/or adjust in editing. The auto colour balance tends to be affected by the predominant colours in the shot, and, if you shoot raw, you will almost certainly need to up the micro contrast and saturation a little. 

 

Then there are other technical failings such as chromatic aberration that must be removed - sure fire QC failure if spotted. 

 

That's essential editing before you start to add any enhancements, which as others have said, are necessary if you want to realistically compete with scenic views etc.

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Post processing is an important part of the process.  Very few images make it out of the camera that are perfect. First thing I do with all images is lens correction and removal of Chromatic Aberration. Can do all of them at once in ACR.

 

Then check at 100% for sharpness, extra CA that was stubborn and needs to be manually corrected. Those that don't pass the sharpness test are immediately deleted, Depending on the time of day and weather, there may be stuff hidden in the shadows that needs to be brought out. Shadows can hide a lot of good imagery.

 

Then some colours may be enhanced to improve the look of the image. On all my Canada Day photos I enhanced all the reds as that is our "official" colour. 

 

If you don't do any PP then you will be binning a lot of good images that just need some help, or submitting average ones instead of .good ones that can compete withe the thousands of other images of the same subject.

 

Jill

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"If you want to really get movin, try the new Dwight Yoakam version of Man of Constant Sorrow :)."

 

Thanks for the tip but can't go to the store right know. Have to keyword 5000 pictures of seashells and seaweed (booooooring :wacko:)

 

Cheers,

Philippe (guess what's playing in the background? No kiddin' :mellow: )

I suggest a test drive on iTunes as it may not be to your liking. It's a bit manic, electric but very tuneful and harmonious vocals. Better for driving than keywording I think.

 

I admire your determination in keywording. I get bored after 5. That sounds not only boring, but very difficult.

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Contact MS (member services) and ask them to delete your submission then submit four of your best images.

 

Allan

How do I contact them? I must have mis-read and thought I needed 3.

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Hey, I'm a Belgian and Belgians are ........... well you know, they invented the saxophone -_-

 

"I just dont make the time ....."

 

Make time! :angry: Sleep less! .... Post-process more! .... Learn the tricks of the trade! .... Work your butt off and buy the soundtrack album of "O Brother Where are Thou?" which makes perfect background music to keep you going during those looooong lonely hours (also when keywording) <_<

 

Cheers,

Philippe :P

 

 

Seeing your forum activity I am amazed that you have got time to shoot, edit, upload and keyword all these images, Philippe  :)

Edited by Niels Quist

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Is it important that I use photo editing software on all of my pictures? I really prefer not to alter my pictures too much, if at all, because I want to show my abilities as a photographer, not a Photoshop artist. I understand that sometimes I will need to edit out blemishes/spots in the pictures, but from what I've heard, it sounds like if I don't do a lot of editing, I won't see many of my photos approved here. 

 

So the real question here is: Am I going to see a lot of rejected photos if I only use editing software on a few of my pictures?

 

Post-processing is as important as taking the picture itself. In fact, that's nothing new. Don't forget how much time the pros in the old days spent in the darkroom  ;) B.t.w. a lot of the Photoshop terminology dates from the darkroom days. 

 

Cheers,

Philippe

 

 

Do you know a good way to learn some of this terminology? Also, I don't have money to buy any editing software at the moment; do you know of any free software that will work until I can come up with the money for Photoshop?

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I believe Gimp is open-source.

If the terms burn and dodge are new to you you may need to learn some basic photography.

BTW this is a professional rather than a camera club sort of forum. Members will try to answer specific questions but they don't usually tutor their potential competition.

Edited by spacecadet
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Is it important that I use photo editing software on all of my pictures? I really prefer not to alter my pictures too much, if at all, because I want to show my abilities as a photographer, not a Photoshop artist. I understand that sometimes I will need to edit out blemishes/spots in the pictures, but from what I've heard, it sounds like if I don't do a lot of editing, I won't see many of my photos approved here. 

 

So the real question here is: Am I going to see a lot of rejected photos if I only use editing software on a few of my pictures?

 

Post-processing is as important as taking the picture itself. In fact, that's nothing new. Don't forget how much time the pros in the old days spent in the darkroom  ;) B.t.w. a lot of the Photoshop terminology dates from the darkroom days. 

 

Cheers,

Philippe

 

 

Do you know a good way to learn some of this terminology? Also, I don't have money to buy any editing software at the moment; do you know of any free software that will work until I can come up with the money for Photoshop?

 

 

Lightroom is a lot cheaper than Photoshop and easier to use for someone just beginning, in my opinion. Scott Kelby's books are good for learning.

 

Paulette

Edited by NYCat

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Idle hands are the devil's workshop.

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Yeah! Took me quite some time staring at a Devil's toenail / Gryphaea dilatata / Gryphea dilatata before I found out what it was  :blink:

 

Cheers,

Philippe

 

 

Funny enough, I might have been able to identify that. I studied geology (although paleontology was never my strong point). But I do remember the devil's toenails now that you mention them. You should never stare at them though - you may be transported back to the Jurassic (probably just an old paleontologist's tale).

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Bro. Just upload your images RAW with minimal editing, any pro photograph researcher will know the potential for post. But you will not get rejected for raw images with no editing, as long as it it sharp and clean, you'll be fine. I don't worry about sales, just a good image. 

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Bro. Just upload your images RAW with minimal editing, any pro photograph researcher will know the potential for post. But you will not get rejected for raw images with no editing, as long as it it sharp and clean, you'll be fine. I don't worry about sales, just a good image. 

 

Alamy require JPEGs only.

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