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I just key worded an exterior of a store that sells mobile phones, sells plans and such.  I've got some nice keywords in there, but should I use "mobile phone" "cell phone" and the plurals when in actuality those are not in the picture?  The store sells them, but if someone is searching for "mobile phone", I don't think they want to see a building, right? This would probably hurt my CTR, I assume.

 

How would you do this? Leave those words out?  Maybe use "mobile phone sales"  in quotes?  I want to get it right.

 

Betty

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I'd put them in myself, but not in quotes. They sound relevant to the picture.

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If someone is searching for "cell phone store" then without those keywords, you are also not going to get any views.

 

You can't help sometimes having keywords you know will bring your images up on a search. Maybe don't put them in essential.

 

Jill

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Hi Betty!

 

I would certainly include mobile phone shop mobile phone store cell phone in the keywords

 

Kumar

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Thanks.  That's the way I've been doing it, to include them, but all of a sudden I thought maybe I was doing it wrong. Sometimes the keyword game feels like walking on quicksand.  :wacko:

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"Mobile Phone Store"

"Cell Phone Store"

"Mobile Phone Retailer"

"Cell Phone Retailer"

"Phone Shop"

"Phone Store"

"Telecoms"

 

Would be my suggestions. Quite often when the Telecoms Companies are in the business pages of a paper it's often the retail stores that are pictured.

 

Michael

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Also, "cellphone" is often written as one word nowadays, here in Canada anyway.

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Ah, some I hadn't thought of, thanks! Great keywords!

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as above really, cell phone is USA, here in uk, mobile phone.

 

also use telephone - the long form of phone.. with cell, cellular,

 

also telecoms / telecommunications.

 

and if its a store, bricks and mortar may be a good keyword to use.

as in the sense of traditional shops being commonly referred to  as this in articles about online shopping,

 

eg retailer "we have phones.com" - is closing down 100000 bricks and mortar shops (an imaginary headline of course"

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as above really, cell phone is USA, here in uk, mobile phone.

 

also use telephone - the long form of phone.. with cell, cellular,

 

also telecoms / telecommunications.

 

and if its a store, bricks and mortar may be a good keyword to use.

as in the sense of traditional shops being commonly referred to  as this in articles about online shopping,

 

eg retailer "we have phones.com" - is closing down 100000 bricks and mortar shops (an imaginary headline of course"

Good idea. Especially the bricks and mortar. Glad I have all that room in comprehensive. :)

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Yes, as John said: cellphone cell phone, also smartphone smartphone and plurals. Picture yourself watching a buyer, who has never seen your image, about to search for something to do with cellphones.

 

I had to do some keyword work with several images of people eating at tables outside restaurants. In Italian, al fresco is two words (meaning 'in the cool'), but it's one word in English - alfresco. And . . . in Italy they don't use that term for eating outside. With keywords, we have to cover ourselves but stop short of spamming. 

 

I put both alfresco and al fresco in the keywords. I do not put in the Italian term for dining outdoors.

Edited by Ed Rooney

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Yes, as John said: cellphone cell phone, also smartphone smartphone and plurals. Picture yourself watching a buyer, who has never seen your image, about to search for something to do with cellphones.

 

I had to do some keyword work with several images of people eating at tables outside restaurants. In Italian, al fresco is two words (meaning 'in the cool'), but it's one word in English - alfresco. And . . . in Italy they don't use that term for eating outside. With keywords, we have to cover ourselves but stop short of spamming. 

 

I put both alfresco and al fresco in the keywords. I do not put in the Italian term for dining outdoors.

I always wondered exactly what alfresco meant. Now I've learned something new. "In the cool." Cool!

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ditto, i literally thought it meant, outside eating.

 

it is a hard one indeed this old keywording lark, i have recently gone low-tech and found its helping my thought processes, and as in my example above to you betty,,,, i have simply been reading more relevant items, and picking up on the odd keywords.

 

and noticing what words are being used more and more, and applying them where needed, as i say anything with a physical location seems to get B&M these days.

 

also, as a slight devitation from your original query, dont be scared to use these new "trendy" words where applicable imo, such as the oxford (i think) dictionary regularly ranks words of the year etc, i have added a few where it made sense, and found sales from them, across a few agencies and my own site. so even though some may make us all groan and moan about the new words, they are in heavy usage, and we can use that to our advantage!

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Ohmygosh! Did I not explain this clearly? Alfresco does mean outside eating in English. In Italian, they would say something as simple as fuori, which means 'outside.' Or they might say something longer, such as andiamo a mangiare al di fuori . . . which means "Let's eat outside." 

 

Our keywording is done in English, and in English the word for eating outside is alfresco. Look it up in your English dictionary. It is not something you will find in an Italian dictionary. 

 

 

Now it is my suspicion, that in British English "al fresco" is the preferred form. Someone who actually knows should tell us. Sooo what I do is use both forms, even though American English is what is used in stock and by Alamy. 

Edited by Ed Rooney

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I have an idea if I only knew all of the keywords I have failed to use that might bring sales, I'd shoot myself.

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For what it's worth, I would write it as al fresco. I'm speaking as a Briton.

 

I think that this points up the advantages in keywording in all of the various English spellings, whichever concept we are trying to convey.

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Surely, in this case, Ian, that's true.

 

I lived in Oxfordshire for about 7 years, but I don't remember writing down alfresco or al fresco that much. As I recall, the weather allowed for about 3 or 4 outdoor dining experiences in that time. 

 

Betty, languages are complex, and keywording is a bitch.  :unsure:

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Trick is to always pack an umbrella,and warm weather gear.

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Did you know that in Germany they call a cell phone or mobile "Handy". Weird. But they do!

Plural is "Handys" as the Germans don't do the ie-plural conversion. Even more weird. 

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Trick is to always pack an umbrella,and warm weather gear.

 

Umbrella? Never use 'em. I had my Wellies and my Barbour thornproof, my Khmer scarf, and of course my Yankee cap. Although I must say I never ran into any thorns in the pubs I went to. (Notice how I artful twisted back to the original subject. Oh wait -- that was a different post.) 

Edited by Ed Rooney

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I just key worded an exterior of a store that sells mobile phones

 

Betty

 

Betty you are supposed to keyword your images. Writing on the exterior of the store will get you done for graffiti. ;)

 

Sorry just my warped sense of humour.

 

Back to OP I agree with what others have said including eating al fresco in Oxford.

 

Allan

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I just key worded an exterior of a store that sells mobile phones

 

Betty

 

Betty you are supposed to keyword your images. Writing on the exterior of the store will get you done for graffiti. ;)

 

Sorry just my warped sense of humour.

 

Back to OP I agree with what others have said including eating al fresco in Oxford.

 

Allan

Oh, but Allan, I've gotten very good at "bombing and tagging". I even wear ninja black when I do it! Edited by Betty LaRue

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I just key worded an exterior of a store that sells mobile phones

 

Betty

Betty you are supposed to keyword your images. Writing on the exterior of the store will get you done for graffiti. ;)

 

Sorry just my warped sense of humour.

 

Back to OP I agree with what others have said including eating al fresco in Oxford.

 

Allan

Oh, but Allan, I've gotten very good at "bombing and tagging". I even wear ninja black when I do it!

 

 

I bet you look really fetching in ninja black. ;)

 

Allan

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Well, you know, I end up with paint drift all over me. ;)

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