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NDI

Images darker once uploaded to Alamy

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I noticed today that some of the images I have uploaded to Alamy look darker than intended when I checked them in Lightroom. Although they looked fine initially, when viewed on the Alamy site from my iPad they appear much darker. I have been using the histogram to make sure exposures appear balanced and working on personal preference as to the appearance of the photographs, but if my display is incorrect it could all be in vain!

 

I have carried out no calibration on my laptop yet and would appreciate any comments on my uploaded images.

 

All criticism welcome :)

 

Many Thanks

 

Cameras: Nikon D7000 & Fuji X100T

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They don't look too dark to me.

 

Mind you, my monitor isn't calibrated either!

 

John.

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Look fine to me on a calibrated iMac.

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Do not forget that smaller images tend to look darker than when they are looked at a larger size.

Edited by Olivier Parent

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All look good to me on my calibrated monitor.

 

Jill

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They appear to be bright enough on my monitor. However, a few like this one might have looked better at another time of day.

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Do this, NDI: Click on the number of your images to open your collection. Then click on an image and it will give you an enlargement. Then click on that enlargement, and it will give you a brighter, lighter image. Are you working on a laptop? If the angle is not perfect, images will look too dark. 

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^^ Ed, I never knew that. Thanks.

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There's one or two that look perfectly exposed for the sky but the main subject is a little dark. Exposing to the right is fine but can result in shadows needing lifted considerably especially in contrasty images. 

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Perfect, thanks all :)

I have shots of the Pantheon from various times of day John. I'll scan through them and check out the differences, I can see now that the building could do with a little more illumination.

 

Ed, that's a great point. I work on a laptop and the viewing angle definitely affects the image appearance.

 

Thanks Dougie, the majority of the shots so far are historic ones taken on holiday with more thought to composition and appearance and very little knowledge of exposure etc.. (all jpegs). I'm taking recent shots in RAW with much more thought to exposure, histogram etc..  I'll have a play with that, I can see where contrasty images are definitely hard to bring out the detail from shadows. I'll have a play with exposing to the left and see how it goes.

 

Nick

Edited by NDI

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No, you need to expose to the right. Make your images a wee bit lighter. Dark images have a lot more noise and it really shows when you brighten them up.

 

Paulette

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No, you need to expose to the right. Make your images a wee bit lighter. Dark images have a lot more noise and it really shows when you brighten them up.

 

Paulette

Indeed!

 

In addition to lessening visible noise, ETTR is particulary effective to maximise the dynamic range obtainable in some images, with particular post-processing, with RAW files (although it needs to be handled with care when bright clouds are present to avoid severe clipping of highlights).

 

Just one more (very important) reason to shoot RAW.

 

dd

Edited by dustydingo
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Perfcet, thanks all :)

 

I have shots of the Pantheon from various times of day John. I'll scan through them and check out the differences, I can see now that the building could do with a little more illumination.

 

Ed, that's a great point. I work on a laptop and the viewing angle definitely affects the image appearance.

 

Thanks Dougie, the majority of the shots so far are historic ones taken on holiday with more thought to composition and appearance and very little knowledge of exposure etc.. (all jpegs). I'm taking recent shots in RAW with much more thought to exposure, histogram etc.. I'll have a play with that, I can see where contrasty images are definitely hard to bring out the detail from shadows. I'll have a play with exposing to the left and see how it goes.

 

Nick

As Paulette said, for those darker images of yours, you should try exposing to the RIGHT, not the left.

 

Here's one of the better explanations

 

dd

Edited by dustydingo
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Generally look fine on my non-callibrated iMac 27" with the exception of two or three but you will find them soon I am sure.

 

Allan

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Your images are not darker on the Alamy website. They just look darker.

 

A file adjusted to normal on a black background will look like a black smudge, when viewed on a white background like the Alamy website.

 

I adjust my images to look their best when viewed on the Alamy website. I adjust on a white monitor background, with normal office level lighting.

 

Edo noticed that when you click on the enlarged thumbnail to get an even larger image, the larger image appears lighter. It appears lighter because the background of the largest image darkens from white to grey. The thumbnail, enlarged image, and biggest image are all the same. It is the background that has changed from white to grey and tricked your brain into believing the biggest image is lighter.

 

This is why the background contained within your photo will have a major effect on the colour and luminance of the subject, and why every RAW image should have a custom adjustment that suits the subject.

 

Here are some examples of how the background changes your perceptions of both colour and luminance. Note white's illusion in particular

 


Edited by Bill Brooks

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