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At this time of year my eyes start to itch and I begin to sneeze, it's hay fever season. It's accompanied by those little flies that turn up as black spots against blue skies.

 

While they do accurately represent the scene, I suspect that they will also lead to a QC failure? 

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Bryan,

 

I have to admit that I never take the chance of leaving them and zap them. My worst experience of this was in Scotland in the midge season - at first I didn't realise and thought something was at fault with my camera, but they had to go. Time consuming, but there you go.

 

Jim. ;)

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I had a few like that when taking a sunset over a reservoir. There were just too many flies/midges to zap so they where not submitted.

 

Allan

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At this time of year my eyes start to itch and I begin to sneeze, it's hay fever season. It's accompanied by those little flies that turn up as black spots against blue skies.

 

While they do accurately represent the scene, I suspect that they will also lead to a QC failure? 

 

I take it you mean pollen polluting sensor during lens changes? At least for me this is one of the main reasons I am not a fan of lens changes - at all. I shot a wedding once where a lot of images had blotches right where faces tend to get shot in vertical. never saw it while chimping, even zoomed in. It was a nightmare to post-edit! This was with a Pentax that I will only remembered as being a real dust-magnet. My Nikon d70 and D300 had not as bad but still pronounced sensor-dust love. So far with Sony a6000 (3 bodies by now.. don't ask) not a single problem and I have probably changed lenses more with these than any system before :)

Edited by Mike R
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Not just the summer flies in the sky or dust specs on sensor, but the birds too can be a pain if your shooting a timelapse movie because that means 240 frames to scrutinise for 10 seconds worth of footage (played back at 24 frames per second).

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I take it you mean pollen polluting sensor during lens changes? At least for me this is one of the main reasons I am not a fan of lens changes - at all. I shot a wedding once where a lot of images had blotches right where faces tend to get shot in vertical. never saw it while chimping, even zoomed in. It was a nightmare to post-edit! This was with a Pentax that I will only remembered as being a real dust-magnet. My Nikon d70 and D300 had not as bad but still pronounced sensor-dust love. So far with Sony a6000 (3 bodies by now.. don't ask) not a single problem and I have probably changed lenses more with these than any system before :)

 

Same experience here Mike, the Canon 5Ds that I have owned have been dust magnets, the mark 1 particularly so, but the Sony NEX 6 is very much better. It's not totally immune, I have cleaned the sensor twice since buying it, but that's one very well used camera, and I have no complaints.

 

Re changing lenses, I use mainly primes on the NEX, so I am changing lenses constantly, while with my Canon I use a couple of zooms, so much less frequent swaps.

 

I think that the problem (for the camera) is flies rather than pollen, and yes I also spend ages cloning them out.

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