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Have you checked your equipment on Cambridge in Colour. Show you the maximum f stop over which you will get diffraction. I found that for my old Nikon it was f11 but for my new Nikon it is f8.

 

dov

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I have bookmarked "Cambridge in Colour". Naturally.

 

Will have a look to see what they have to say.

 

Allan

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Many of my images on Alamy that I shot with a Canon 5D (mk I) and 24-105L were shot at f16. Maybe I should have kept that lens.

 

But I'm all Sony mirrorless now anyway.

Bill,

 

I assume you've gained a weight/hassle advantage, but are the images comparable?

Which model have you chosen?

 

Chris

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I sold off my 5D, 24-105, 70-200 etc just about two years ago. I was tired of the weight, the 12-megapixel was getting outmoded, and I decided that mirrorless had matured enough. Actually, that's why I sprung for the 5D in early 2006--I had decided that full-frame digital had matured enough in terms of pixel count and reasonable-enough price. So with the proceeds, I started accumulating:

- Sony NEX-6 with kit lens
- Sony 10-18mm
then later in 2013:
- Sony a3000
then in mid-2014:
- Sony a6000 + 16-70mm (combo deal of $1300 at B&H)
then late last year:
- Sony 55-210mm (cheap unwarrantied on Amazon)

Filter my remarks about these through the facts that I am rather part-time on photography, retired from another profession; I don't do studio/commercial/assignments, so I don't look for equipment to satisfy those needs; and I have nothing against Fuji XT-1, four-thirds, or any of the others.

The a6000/16-70mm is my main camera, giving me the same focal range as the 5D/24-105mm, which suits my style. Are the images comparable? I would say comparable but different (only now at twice the pixels), in that a full-frame seems to give you a wider range of depth of field. No, I don't shoot at f16 with these cameras.

I keep the 10-18mm on the a3000. The a3000 has a quirky set of feature compromises, but the price is very low and the 20-mp IQ is very high. I think it's a good match with that lens--the fiddliness of the a3000 doesn't matter as much with a very wide-angle, as it's unlikely I'll be shooting anything that moves much.

The NEX-6 with kit lens stays in our car as a stealth walk-around camera. I also use it with the 55-210mm.

Since the OP is about QC, let's talk about that, so that the thread is not totally highjacked. Since I started accumulating the Sonys, I've successfully submitted 770 images, from all the cameras and lenses, at many focal points. I've sold a few. They work for Alamy.

I was happy where I was photographically in 2006 with the Canon full-frame, and I'm happy where I am now with the Sonys. I carry the a6000 and a3000 around in a smallish bag. Life is good.

ps - I also picked up a Canon SL-1 along the way, mainly to use with an existing Canon 55-250 at the grandson's soccer games. Some shots from that camera have also made it onto Alamy.

pps - Make that 781 images accepted from the new cameras--another small batch just approved.

Edited by Bill Kuta
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Bill, Mirrorless has definitely taken a load off my aging bones, and I'm happy about that. I had some QC problems with the NEX-6 at first because I wasn't used to the hybrid focusing system. Have had no problems since then. However, I do occasionally downsize images, probably more out of paranoia than necessity. As mentioned earlier, I've found that the lens modules developed by DxO (DxO OpticsPro) for the Sony e-mount lenses have greatly improved the look of my images. Even so, I still get the jitters every time I upload a new batch to Alamy.

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Bill, many thanks for that reply - sounds like a true digital replacement for my Ricoh GR1 at last!

Will have to try it myself.

John, personally, I would still run them through Lightroom to get the preprocessing advantages.

 

Chris

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