Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Sultanpepa

Information required about photographing Italy

Recommended Posts

I lived in Rome, speak Italian, love the people, and understand the culture. However, I lived there a long time ago . . . and was last in the Mother of Cities in 2008. I mean my 'tips' might not be up to the minute. 

 

There's a simple little restaurant in Trastevere called Da Augusto, where the food is good and the prices are reasonable. Go for lunch: http://www.tripadvisor.com/Restaurant_Review-g187791-d1717793-Reviews-Da_Augusto-Rome_Lazio.html

 

When walking around keep your camera and camera bag on the buildings side . . . not on the street side. And watch out for two guys riding piggyback on a motorbike. 

 

Italian is a polite language -- they say please  (per favore) and thank you (grazie - not graci) in every sentence. The good news is lots of people speak English now. 

 

Dove (say dough-vay) means 'where.' A good word to know. 

 

Pasta is a first course, so smaller than a portion you or I might eat at home. 

 

Buon viaggio!  :) 

 

Edo

Edited by Ed Rooney
  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

The Vatican museums / St Peter's are not open on Sundays for tourists and close early afternoon on Saturdays as far as I remember. Check their website, they sometimes have other days closed for certain events. Long queues are to be expected as they X-ray all your bags before you get in. 

 

As far as I can remember "in theory" taking pictures in Sistine Chapel was not allowed. In reality, you will see. :)

. :)

 

 

Yes, your are right - lots of people snapping away, so lots of flashes etc., and the 'NO PHO-TO' shouted every few minutes over the hubub..... not a serene experience and I personally have not bothered to try to take any photos in there partly because it would just be too much bother to get anything close to a good photo. Mostly because I am too busy just looking at the frescoes in amazement.

 

I wouldn't dream of missing it out!  :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

The Vatican museums / St Peter's are not open on Sundays for tourists and close early afternoon on Saturdays as far as I remember. Check their website, they sometimes have other days closed for certain events. Long queues are to be expected as they X-ray all your bags before you get in. 

 

 This probably won't help with queues etc: http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-europe-32447603

 

Michael

 

 

:rolleyes:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Now back from my few days in Rome may I first apologise for not responding sooner. It's been so long since I've physically had to log in that for the life of me I couldn't remember my log-in details. My bad. I was however able to read all your helpful comments and for that I thank you all. The only problem I had was getting on the bus to the airport on the way home. A combination of a large tired queue and disorganised bus co.staff resulted in a bit of a scuffle as I quite legitimately tried to by-pass a pressing crowd. Apart from that I managed to negotiate all other aspects that Rome could throw at me without incident. There was many police (Camaraderie) and soldiers in the area which I assume, maybe wrongly, was down to visiting European dignitaries. I asked two of the armed soldiers for permission to photograph which was declined. No worries, I moved on. Police were also a bit reticent but they were easier to be caught in the crowds. My feet and legs are sore from the miles of walking and in the short time I was there I couldn't see everything. For instance, the Vatican queue was three hours long, time better spent in other places I felt as I wasn't there specifically for photography. It is quite a place. Crossing a busy road is quite an experience, noise is constant as is the continuous stream of scooters, the street vendors selling roses and selfie sticks was a constant annoyance. Little Roma women in shalls with bent backs and toothless contorted faces begged for coins with their little bowls. I drew some comfort of not donating when I watched time after time nuns walk by without a second glance. The history is of course incredible and I highly recommend hiring a guide. My thanks to Margarita for her spoken English and her vast knowledge of her beloved home city. If anyone is looking for a recommendation I can supply the company name. The Metro was an experience I managed to survive but I didn't tempt fate by doing it again. I'm sure a felt my pocket being "tested". I was alert to it though, they weren't getting anything. :) Anyway, to cut this long story shorter, I'll just again thank you all for the helpful comments and although it was manic I will go back some day soon. It's a street photographers paradise. Grazie

Edited by Sultanpepa

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When I was 14 a teacher in my school gave me the name and address of a girl in Rome who wanted a Welsh pen friend. (remember those?!). So I wrote off and got a reply in Italian. Wales being full of Italian cafes it was easy for me to visit our fish and chip shop in Splott, Gazzi's, and get a translation. This exchange went on for a few months when she sent a photo of herself. Gorgeous, sixteen, leaning against a Vespa scooter in a piazza. Papa Gazzi read the letter, admired her photo and said she wanted a photo of me. Easy for me of course. Self timer pic, into my little darkroom, develop, print, post off to Rome. Never heard from her again. Fourteen and broken hearted. The power of photography.

  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Pity there was no photoshopping in those days Pete. You could have been a handsome Prince. ;) (Not that I'm saying you aren't) (Oh oh, shovel, hole, dig)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

True, but I would have been found out in the end without plastic surgery to match the photoshopping! I told that story at the opening of one of my exhibitions in Italy and everyone sympathised and felt sorry for me. - At least that's what they said! 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My only problem in Rome is crossing the street. My solution, wait for a Nun to come along and follow her. Italians simply refuse to run over a Nun.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My only problem in Rome is crossing the street. My solution, wait for a Nun to come along and follow her. Italians simply refuse to run over a Nun.

 

I preferred just to shut my eyes and take a leap of faith. I backed up my faith by walking on the lee side of the crossing in a group of at least a dozen others. lol ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My first trip abroad was to Italy.  I went with a couple of Irish lads stationed in London.  One of them was keen to get to Rome hoping to meet the Pope.  I was more interested in Italian film actresses.

 

We travelled by thumb, crossing the Channel to Ostend, and took a circuitous route to Luxembourg, and then nearly got stranded.  Eventually we were picked up by a British tourist coach travelling to Milan to pick up some punters.  And some cigarettes to smuggle through customs. We had the coach to ourselves, and were able to spend the first night in Italy kipping in the coach. 

 

Unfortunately we never reached Rome.  So I can't really help the OP at all.  Except to say, if you haven't seen any, do take a look at some of those great old black & white Italian films made in the 50s and 60s: La Strada, La Dolce Vita, La Notte, L'Eclisse, etc.  I learned more about photography looking at those films than I did from any still pictures.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Photography in Italian churches is fine, in my experience, as long as you introduce yourself to the priest first, naturally, and explain what your interest in his building is.

 

Maybe I should tell you about the priest I met in Bologna who told me I was there to photograph the church so that others would come and burn it down!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Italy's photography is governed by the "King's decree on image rights" from 1943. All subjects, regardless of age, have to provide the photographer an explicit written permission. Without such photographs can not be taken or stored. The only two exceptions are when somebody /asks/ you explicitly to take a picture (and this applies to professional photographers with a studio) or when photo-journalism is concerned. The latter is so only because the Italian Constitution, that is more recent and more powerful juridically, applies freedom of speech on the citizen's right to be informed. This does not apply with minors, by the way.

 

That said, the law isn't enforced at the moment and the only case I remember when the law has been mentioned (unsuccessful) was when a professional photo-journalist took pictures of politicians having a time of their life with some prostitutes at Berlusconi's villa in Sardegna... The only important bit is to respect anyone's explicit request not to be photographed and avoid taking pictures of minors.

 

Last by not least: Rome is a fairly safe city. Just keep you money safe from petty thieves and keep an eye on really chaotic traffic pattern.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Italy's photography is governed by the "King's decree on image rights" from 1943. All subjects, regardless of age, have to provide the photographer an explicit written permission. Without such photographs can not be taken or stored. The only two exceptions are when somebody /asks/ you explicitly to take a picture (and this applies to professional photographers with a studio) or when photo-journalism is concerned. The latter is so only because the Italian Constitution, that is more recent and more powerful juridically, applies freedom of speech on the citizen's right to be informed. This does not apply with minors, by the way.

 

That said, the law isn't enforced at the moment and the only case I remember when the law has been mentioned (unsuccessful) was when a professional photo-journalist took pictures of politicians having a time of their life with some prostitutes at Berlusconi's villa in Sardegna... The only important bit is to respect anyone's explicit request not to be photographed and avoid taking pictures of minors.

 

Last by not least: Rome is a fairly safe city. Just keep you money safe from petty thieves and keep an eye on really chaotic traffic pattern.

 

You wouldn't know that by the amount of police cars and ambulances zooming around but yes I did feel pretty safe except when crossing busy roads.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.