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Book that translates American English to British..

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The real challenge for Yanks in the UK is when we have to bring a car in for a checkup -- every piece and part has a different name.  :)

You mean a service?

 

 

:lol:  :)

 

And yes, Ed - I agree about the need to turn on the subtitles for many Aussie films. In fact, I also sometimes need it for some American and British films.

 

Regarding the keywords on Alamy I try to include the common British and American spellings - and different words - if I am aware of them. The normal spelling of organize is organise in the UK - except for the Oxford Dictionary which is still sticking to the ancient British and modern American spelling  (as far as I know, otherwise please enlighten me) -which still may be the most used dictionary by students abroad.

 

 

Yes, get your macchina serviced or have a checkup and don't forget to have them look under the bonnet or the hood and in the trunk or the boot . . . even if they have to use a spanner . . . or a wrench. 

 

I hope you don't think I have an easy time understanding the English used in some English or American films. I've heard that some Scandinavians think Danish and Swedish are pretty much the same language and others are shocked by this view? 

 

Incidentally, Scandinavia has been producing some really good films and TV shows in recent years, now that everyone is out from under the shadow of the great Bergman. 

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Yes, get your macchina serviced or have a checkup and don't forget to have them look under the bonnet or the hood and in the trunk or the boot . . . even if they have to use a spanner . . . or a wrench. 

 

I hope you don't think I have an easy time understanding the English used in some English or American films. I've heard that some Scandinavians think Danish and Swedish are pretty much the same language and others are shocked by this view? 

 

Incidentally, Scandinavia has been producing some really good films and TV shows in recent years, now that everyone is out from under the shadow of the great Bergman. 

 

 

Yes, more differencies than would seem at first sight.

 

Not to turn the thread into a Norse language discussion, but ,of course, there are similar tendencies among the Nordic languages - and very much different words and pronunciations, and even a slightly different alphabet. A Dane would understand a Swede, and the other way round. The language in some areas will be more difficult to understand than others, though. The Danish island Bornholm is so far out in the Baltic Sea that the Danish there can sound more like a Swedish variety and can be difficult to understand. When we are very mean we call the islanders "Substitute Swedes", when they are not listening.... But, as I said - I wouldn't like to hijack the thread - no-one will have to keyword in Danish, though I sometimes include some main and important Danish keywords.....  :)

Edited by Niels Quist

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I look at key wording as freedom to go on a spree of spelling mistakes and typos. If you make lots & lots of mistakes and alternatives, you are bound to hit most of the right versions and as a bonus, scoop up a few researchers who cant spell either. In any case, languages are evolving, not just English. When I first washed up on these shores shopkeepers would look aghast when I asked for thumb tacks and it took some time before someone suggested it was drawing pins I was after. And when did Canadian Tire loose the y? I still can't get my head 'round nearside and offside; what's wrong with left and right? In most of the UK, pants are underwear and the longer things down your legs are trousers. We put petrol or diesel in the tank, but "step on the gas" in either case if we mean to get a move on. There are about half a dozen ways of spelling voodoo; lets not get pedantic, just use them all if you're into that kind of thing.

 

There was a cartoon book about Strine which was great fun but it's probably out of date and out of print.

 

There is a clutch of well informed members of this forum could probably put together a guide but the trouble is, almost nobody would buy it. Mostly we expect a free app

Edited by Robert M Estall
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Anybody can tell how do you call punnet in UK? Plastic (or wooden) box for vegetable picking like here:

 

ripe-strawberries-picked-to-white-plasti

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Strawberries are usually sold in punnets. People who pick fruit and veg from their garden will often use a trug; a shallow, usually wooden or woven basket.

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Anybody can tell how do you call punnet in UK? Plastic (or wooden) box for vegetable picking like here:

 

ripe-strawberries-picked-to-white-plasti

 

And that box looks a bit big for an English punnet.

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As Ian said they're sold in punnets, not necessarily picked in them, but it would reduce handling. That basket is also pretty big. You wouldn't often buy that many strawberries at once, they'd go off.

I would put 'punnet' in the esskeys though. I'd want that picture to come up.

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Thanks good people for all help :)

In Poland we buy strawberries in 2kg wooden punnets. They are the same size as this one on the picture above. Polish do many different things of that fruits so it's not unusual to buy big basket even every two days :)

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There was a cartoon book about Strine which was great fun but it's probably out of date and out of print.

 

 

 

It was out of date before it was published . . . unless you lived in or were visiting Sydney which, believe it or not, is just one small bit of Aus.

 

dd

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The dictionary that comes with the Mac OS has a thesaurus that shows American and British versions on the same page.

 

For instance:

 

trucknounheavily laden truckrigeighteen-wheelertransporttransport trucktractor-trailerflatbedpickuppickup truck,vanBrit. lorry.

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