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Martin P Wilson

Benefits of shooting a photo essay

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I suppose Micawber is better than Scrooge:

 

ebenezer-scrooge-grave-stone-in-st-chads

Edited by Martin P Wilson

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Chaucer? Surely later than that. 

 

I've been reading along on this 'photo essay' (picture story) idea. It was a popular form from the '40s into the '60s, with the advent of Life Magazine  and the smaller 35mm cameras. I got in on the end of it. Then, as I recall, Pete Turner, Art Kane and others came along with the concept of illustrating an article with one single image. 

 

https://www.google.com/webhp?sourceid=chrome-instant&ion=1&espv=2&ie=UTF-8#q=w%20eugene%20smith

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Chaucer? Surely later than that. 

 

I've been reading along on this 'photo essay' (picture story) idea. It was a popular form from the '40s into the '60s, with the advent of Life Magazine  and the smaller 35mm cameras. I got in on the end of it. Then, as I recall, Pete Turner, Art Kane and others came along with the concept of illustrating an article with one single image. 

 

https://www.google.com/webhp?sourceid=chrome-instant&ion=1&espv=2&ie=UTF-8#q=w%20eugene%20smith

 

In the Uk we had the same story in the 40s and 50s - Pictures Post for example with Bert Hardy amongst others, but the magazines disappeared. The photo story became big again in the 70s and 80s in the UK when the quality Sunday papers introduced their colour supplements. They used a lot of heavy weight photojournalism, McCullin et al. But then in mid 80s they started to move to lighter topics, eventually celebrity and fashion led, and became just a vehicle for consumer advertising - there is a bit of resurgence of actual journalism at the moment (i hope).

Edited by Martin P Wilson

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I suppose Micawber is better than Scrooge:

 

ebenezer-scrooge-grave-stone-in-st-chads

 

 

 

I hope this one has leased here or somewhere else.

 

 

"Chaucer? Surely later than that."

 

Some sources attribute the saying to Ben Franklin, who apparently liked to fly kites during thunderstorms.

Edited by John Mitchell

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Right, Martin. I lived in Oxfordshire throughout most of the '80s. Didn't know Chaucer or Franklin, though. They must have drank at a different local. 

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It has had a few views John but it only went up in late autumn - a bit late for Christmas 2014. But I am so far down the pecking order I am not sure it will get seen.

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