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Get the inside view on the most searched terms across 2014.

 

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Informative post. Thanks. By the way, the following sentence does not pass grammatical QC, so you might want to correct the error and resubmit:

 

"Number four on the list was “Stockimo” which also bagged top spot for the most amount of images viewed;"

 

It should be "the highest number of images viewed."

 

Images are countable, so technically you need to use "number."

 

"Amount" is used for non-countable quantities -- e.g. amount of flour, rain, etc.

 

Sorry to be such a stickler.

Edited by John Mitchell
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I hate hearing "fewer" and "less" being confused.

 

Me too. It's epidemic these days. There would be less confusion if fewer people misused them. B)

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Perhaps "Less is more"  LOL :D

 

L

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Perhaps "Less is more"  LOL :D

 

L

 

apparently so these days

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Thanks to Ben Gray for an easy to understand article about keywording.

Edited by Bill Brooks

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Informative post. Thanks. By the way, the following sentence does not pass grammatical QC, so you might want to correct the error and resubmit:

 

"Number four on the list was “Stockimo” which also bagged top spot for the most amount of images viewed;"

 

It should be "the highest number of images viewed."

 

Images are countable, so technically you need to use "number."

 

"Amount" is used for non-countable quantities -- e.g. amount of flour, rain, etc.

 

Sorry to be such a stickler.

 

 

I hate hearing "fewer" and "less" being confused.

 

I've felt the same until recently. However, common usage will out and the use of 'fewer' is disappearing (I believe that it's a relatively recent construct, in any case).  Grammatical correctness depends upon usage: if no-one (nobody? :unsure: ) uses a term, phrase or structure anymore, then it ceases to be grammatically correct for the simple fact that it ceases to exist!

 

I live in the south of England.  I live fewer miles from Martin than I do from John, but could I still get to Martin's house in fewer than 2 minutes?  No!  But I could get there in less than 3 days! :P

 

BTW (aaargh - let's not go there! And as for 'smileys' :). And starting a sentence with 'And'), I am also beginning to have difficulty communicating with my near-teen daughter. :unsure::lol: Evolution or revolution? :D

 

 

Perhaps "Less is more"  LOL :D

 

L

 

I think that you'll find that fewer is less.  Umm least.  I mean fewer. Do I?! :lol: ....

 

fewer.jpg

 

Does that get me back on-topic? :D

 

Sorry, but it is the weekend.

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Yes, there are fewer and fewer people using "fewer" these days. And a number of really young ones have probably never even heard the word spoken. I'm going to blame all this mainly on an educational system that no longer sees any value in teaching children the rules of traditional English grammar and usage. But no amount of complaining is going to undo what has been done. "Most amount of images" it is then. 

 

Interestingly enough, people who learn English as a second language now often speak more gramatically "correct" English than native speakers because in order to learn the language, they actually have to study some grammar.

Edited by John Mitchell

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Get the inside view on the most searched terms across 2014.

 

Read more...

 

Do the sales follow the same ranking?

 

More dogs than cats?

More Paris than London?

More Lego than chocolate?

More sky than water?

More champagne than piggy bank?

 

 

According to All of Alamy this is the best selling (49x - 2 UCO - ) image ever:

 

D33HA1.jpg
 
Or has it been refunded 24 times?
 
 
Don't you love lists? I do.
This is my favorite list from the same data:
 
Search Term                UCO       Zooms

baseball logo              2         253    

Dog Beach Sea              1         177

taylor kitsch              2         158    

the new forest BRITAIN     1         157    

mature person portrait     1         154    

turkey aegean              1         147    

horse animal               2         143

Sea Horse Beach            1         141    

county wicklow ireland     1         128    

emsland                    1         137  

 
Who said clients always go for the top 3 rows of the first page?
Oops. Mea culpa. Mea maxima culpa.
 
wim

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Wim:

 

Thanks for the reminder that some statistics do not make sense.

 

All those zooms could be by an Alamy image buyer account holder who is doing subject research for his other business. The other business being stock photography.

 

Statistics are always correct. It is the interpretation that is frequently wrong.

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Statistics are always correct. It is the interpretation that is frequently wrong.

 

 

Sorry, I just can't let that pass - [Rant Mode On] Statistics are frequently wrong because the person presenting them doesn't check that the inputs are valid and the calculations have been done correctly. I can cite some published by the BIS (Bank for International Settlements) from a couple of years ago which are just plain wrong (some of the instruments they gave stats for simply don't exist). You might argue that the underlying numbers are correct but just misunderstood and misinterpreted... would that really mean that the statistics are correct? [\Rant Mode Off] 

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I stand corrected TokyoM1ke, and of course governments often fudge the data in order to mislead.

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