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I'm sure you're right ED.

My own picture RedSnapper, a recent news upload which may be of interest to a regional newspaper (do they (regional newspaper staff) just browse the feeds or do Alamy editors actively push images to possible buyers even on a small story)?
I was also considering tweeting to a couple of organisations who may have an interest.

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I guess if you are sending an image to them that they might want to download from Alamy, I can't see any reason not to. On the other hand, if you send them an image, they might just say 'Thanks,' and use it anyway, without bothering to pay for it.

 

I am not aware of any reason why you wouldn't self promote your Alamy work in any way you like. I've not seen it done, but FAA members do it all the time on Twitter.

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I guess if you are sending an image to them that they might want to download from Alamy, I can't see any reason not to. On the other hand, if you send them an image, they might just say 'Thanks,' and use it anyway, without bothering to pay for it.

 

I am not aware of any reason why you wouldn't self promote your Alamy work in any way you like. I've not seen it done, but FAA members do it all the time on Twitter.

 

 

The idea was to let them know it was available at Alamy for them to license it from there.

If they said thanks and used it anyway, I would chase them for recompense.

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When I tweet an image I usually tweet from my PhotoShelter site which has a tweet button on each page. Occasionally I'll link it to the image on Alamy using one of the URL shortening services available.

It's a bit less conventient than tweeting an image from your phone but you don't have to be concerned with various permissions involved in using TwitPic or other third party websites.

 

You can send direct messages to anyone who is following you. Otherwise  the tweet is public and available to everyone.

 

fD

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When I tweet an image I usually tweet from my PhotoShelter site which has a tweet button on each page. Occasionally I'll link it to the image on Alamy using one of the URL shortening services available.

It's a bit less conventient than tweeting an image from your phone but you don't have to be concerned with various permissions involved in using TwitPic or other third party websites.

 

You can send direct messages to anyone who is following you. Otherwise  the tweet is public and available to everyone.

 

fD

 

Thanks, it was for an image which is on Alamy but nowhere else. I just used the image from the zoom, thanks.

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When I upload news images from a major event (an event of national interest), I usually tweet a link to a gallery on my website (Photoshelter) with a quick caption.  I have noticed a spike in traffic on the site when I do this but I've not licensed any images directly from my site (perhaps my prices are too high as compared to the prices of my agents).

 

My philosophy, for what it's worth =>  If I am promoting my images through social media channels like Twitter, I want full price for those images and I want to be compensated for those marketing efforts.  If Alamy is promoting my images, I will gladly pay Alamy their royalty commission to promote my images.

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When I upload news images from a major event (an event of national interest), I usually tweet a link to a gallery on my website (Photoshelter) with a quick caption.  I have noticed a spike in traffic on the site when I do this but I've not licensed any images directly from my site (perhaps my prices are too high as compared to the prices of my agents).

 

 

 

 

Offhand I don't remember licensing any images as a result, but I have had people who appeared in my photos contact me, and were happy to sign a model release in exchange for a low res file.

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The Mirror used twitter embed function to embed my tweet from yesterday mornings horrible rain. I WM the image but they still used it in their timeline. I just used the hashtag #weatherbomb and someone alerted me to the fact they had done it. Seeking advice about though. Now reviewing my use of direct image upload to twitter as a result. 

 

15995467842_5a447a3941_n.jpgCapture_weatherbomb by campsiestreet, on Flickr

 

Just be careful because the embed function is freely available to use by anyone and it's obviously a new trick by the media to include tweets in online stories. Don't get me wrong, my twitter stats went through the roof on that tweet, but it's not the point. I could just delete the tweet, but I want to see what comes out of the advice first. 

 

I know a girl who tweets media organisations all the time. She basically just gives them images for free over twitter. I tend to link from my website or wherever the images have been uploaded to. 

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The Mirror used twitter embed function to embed my tweet from yesterday mornings horrible rain. I WM the image but they still used it in their timeline. I just used the hashtag #weatherbomb and someone alerted me to the fact they had done it. Seeking advice about though. Now reviewing my use of direct image upload to twitter as a result. 

 

15995467842_5a447a3941_n.jpgCapture_weatherbomb by campsiestreet, on Flickr

 

Just be careful because the embed function is freely available to use by anyone and it's obviously a new trick by the media to include tweets in online stories. Don't get me wrong, my twitter stats went through the roof on that tweet, but it's not the point. I could just delete the tweet, but I want to see what comes out of the advice first. 

 

I know a girl who tweets media organisations all the time. She basically just gives them images for free over twitter. I tend to link from my website or wherever the images have been uploaded to. 

 

I'd be interested in the outcome of their publishing your picture. Is there anything in the TOS of twitter about the situation?

Shame about your friend giving stuff away... do you try to discourage her?

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The Mirror used twitter embed function to embed my tweet from yesterday mornings horrible rain. I WM the image but they still used it in their timeline. I just used the hashtag #weatherbomb and someone alerted me to the fact they had done it. Seeking advice about though. Now reviewing my use of direct image upload to twitter as a result. 

 

Capture_weatherbomb by campsiestreet, on Flickr

 

Just be careful because the embed function is freely available to use by anyone and it's obviously a new trick by the media to include tweets in online stories. Don't get me wrong, my twitter stats went through the roof on that tweet, but it's not the point. I could just delete the tweet, but I want to see what comes out of the advice first. 

 

I know a girl who tweets media organisations all the time. She basically just gives them images for free over twitter. I tend to link from my website or wherever the images have been uploaded to. 

 

I'd be interested in the outcome of their publishing your picture. Is there anything in the TOS of twitter about the situation?

Shame about your friend giving stuff away... do you try to discourage her?

 

 

Spoke to copyright lawyer for the BAJ who says I have a case for charging a fee for that. The plot thickens. 

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Absolutely you do Paul....in the U.S. there was recently a very high profile court case about Getty and Agence France Press taking images from a photographer that tweeted  images from Haiti a few years ago

 

Daniel Morel uploaded the images to Twitpic - Getty and Agence France Press were involved

 

http://lens.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/11/23/haitian-photographer-wins-major-u-s-copyright-victory/?_r=0

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Absolutely you do Paul....in the U.S. there was recently a very high profile court case about Getty and Agence France Press taking images from a photographer that tweeted  images from Haiti a few years ago

 

Daniel Morel uploaded the images to Twitpic - Getty and Agence France Press were involved

 

http://lens.blogs.nytimes.com/2013/11/23/haitian-photographer-wins-major-u-s-copyright-victory/?_r=0

 

Apparently this allows anyone to do it

 

"The embedding in a website of a protected work which is publicly accessible on another website by means of a link using the framing technology … does not by itself constitute communication to the public within the meaning of [the EU Copyright directive] to the extent that the relevant work is neither communicated to a new public nor by using a specific technical means different from that used for the original communication." 1

 

Direct upload to twitter is certainly not going to be high on my list of priorities from now on. 

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That judgment merely goes to the question of copyright infringement. It doesn't entitle anyone to free use of material.

I expect Twitter's Ts and Cs grant them a  licence when you upload, but they don't grant one to anyone else.

Edited by spacecadet
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That judgment merely goes to the question of copyright infringement. It doesn't entitle anyone to free use of material.

I expect Twitter's Ts and Cs grant them a  licence when you upload, but they don't grant one to anyone else.

 

 

My reading of this... " does not by itself constitute communication to the public..." is that they are not doing anything with it that you haven't already done, ie allowing it to be seen by 'the public', and they are only showing your link where you shared it to 'the public', they are not getting free use of it, but merely showing what you did, ie you showed it to the public via Twitter.

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That judgment merely goes to the question of copyright infringement. It doesn't entitle anyone to free use of material.

I expect Twitter's Ts and Cs grant them a  licence when you upload, but they don't grant one to anyone else.

 

 

 

My reading of this... " does not by itself constitute communication to the public..." is that they are not doing anything with it that you haven't already done, ie allowing it to be seen by 'the public', and they are only showing your link where you shared it to 'the public', they are not getting free use of it, but merely showing what you did, ie you showed it to the public via Twitter.

In essence, they are publicising the Twitter feed.

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