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No doubt I'll learn to do a better job of keywording as time goes by. However I want to address a different problem: low click through rate.

 

My CTR is running less than half of the Alamy average (0.22 vs. 0.53 currently). When I look at the keywords that were used to bring up my images along with others, nothing seems very wide of the mark. The keywords searched and my shots are relevant to each other. It's just that buyers aren't clicking on mine, so I have to think that maybe the problem is in the photography itself.

 

Somewhere I read that an image has to "work as a thumbnail" to be successful. I'd like to think I know what this means, but if I did I'd probably have a higher CTR. If you were to put it into words, what would they be?

 

Thanks,

Don

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Ideally, a thumbnail will grab viewer's attention, due to one or more qualities apparent even in a small image - vibrant colors, easily identifiable subject, stark contrast....

 

Because thumbnails are small, certain qualities - such as great detail, lots going on - that can be desirable in a larger image can be lost, or even work against, a thumbnail's effectiveness.

 

- Ann

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Hi Don:

 

Go through your views and see how many competitor's pictures there were for the search terms. You may find that in a lot of your images (which are very nice by the way) you are fighting against the current of thousands of choices for the buyers.

 

Sea Lion has 16,000 images.

 

The more choices the buyers have, the less your odds of a zoom.

 

Jill

Edited by Jill Morgan
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Does "view" mean that my image(s) appeared on a page which the buyer viewed? Let's say I'm on page 12. Does it mean that they got to page 12?

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Does "view" mean that my image(s) appeared on a page which the buyer viewed? Let's say I'm on page 12. Does it mean that they got to page 12?

 

Yes, a view means your image showed up on one of the pages viewed by the buyer.

 

Jill

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Does "view" mean that my image(s) appeared on a page which the buyer viewed? Let's say I'm on page 12. Does it mean that they got to page 12?

 

Yes, a view means your image showed up on one of the pages viewed by the buyer.

 

Jill

 

 

But your image was not necessarily viewed by the buyer. It just happened to be there.

 

Allan

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David Kilpatrick generously provided a list of things to do in order to improve your chances of selling some while ago. I don't have a link unfortunately but someone else may be able to assist?

 

Not noticed David on the forum recently.

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David Kilpatrick generously provided a list of things to do in order to improve your chances of selling some while ago. I don't have a link unfortunately but someone else may be able to assist?

 

Not noticed David on the forum recently.

I think it may have been this one Bryan   http://www.dphotoexpert.com/2010/12/31/thirty-keys-to-stock-photography/

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David Kilpatrick generously provided a list of things to do in order to improve your chances of selling some while ago. I don't have a link unfortunately but someone else may be able to assist?

 

Not noticed David on the forum recently.

I think it may have been this one Bryan   http://www.dphotoexpert.com/2010/12/31/thirty-keys-to-stock-photography/

 

Cheers Steve, well worth re - reading!

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No doubt I'll learn to do a better job of keywording as time goes by. However I want to address a different problem: low click through rate.

 

My CTR is running less than half of the Alamy average (0.22 vs. 0.53 currently). When I look at the keywords that were used to bring up my images along with others, nothing seems very wide of the mark. The keywords searched and my shots are relevant to each other. It's just that buyers aren't clicking on mine, so I have to think that maybe the problem is in the photography itself.

 

Somewhere I read that an image has to "work as a thumbnail" to be successful. I'd like to think I know what this means, but if I did I'd probably have a higher CTR. If you were to put it into words, what would they be?

 

Thanks,

Don

If it's a 'general' kind of image of a town/city I would agree that the thumbnail impact is important. However for a more specific search it depends on the image alone.

 

For example i have just licensed images from Venice, Italy, that were specific to a particular restaurant - only five options on that from Alamy.

 

My CTR was pretty poor for a while but I was still selling. Don't understand it really.

 

If you get a niche then that's the best. 

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I believe there are two elements, ignoring content, to keeping your CTR high.

 

Firstly, as highlighted above, key wording.

 

Secondly managing your portfolio and transferring non performing images to another pseudo after say 2 years. A further variant of this is to open a new pseudo for any major projects with unpredictable attraction ie major trip to India, 400 images in my case.

 

.dov

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