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Good morning All.

 

Though I've been an Alamy contributor a fair while and have enjoyed reading forum this is my 1st post.

 

in 4 weeks time I reach UK retirement age and will "slow up". Having suffered "Frozen shoulder" with hours at submissions & keywording at the computer

my family are quite happy for me to call it quits.

 

I don't intend to but will seek a more balanced approach.

 

So to those out there of "Silver hair Variety" ...what do you do???

 

(I just tried a week's leave out my self employment schedule and was bored out my mind.....but I do wish to dispel the aches and pains of computer usage.)

 

 

I look forward to your replies.

 

Sparks!  (a nautical term for those from the radio room at sea)

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A serious question--if your problems are the shoulder of the arm you use to move the computer mouse, have you tried swapping the mouse over to the other hand? Takes some practise, but so did using the mouse first time.

 

And a proper ergonomically set-up screen, keyboard, desk and chair can add years to one's keywording career, which in turn can add years to one's photography career :)

 

dd

Edited by dustydingo

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Thanks for your for advice.

 

Maybe I phrased the statements wrong. The frozen shoulder was dealt with by physiotherapy a while ago.

 

I'm just trying to sound out the members as to how they balance out getting older and still enjoying submissions & photography

 

Sparks!

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Can't afford to retire but I spend more time doing things I enjoy and photographing those.

 

Pearl

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I have moved to a mirrorless system and like Pearl I am working at the photography and writing I want to do.

 

I still need an income but I have stopped chasing gigs - it is about enough money to follow my enthusiasms (photography, writing, good food, slow travel) rather than acquiring "stuff". Funnily the gigs have started to come anyway ;) I still treat it as work but it is work for pleasure rather than maximum cash. As mother said "Martin won't retire - he will just do something different"; indeed I have, I have returned to an old passion: words and pictures.

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I've spent most of the last 30 years at a computer and for 20 of those I've suffered shoulder pains, RSI in fingers and wrists, and various other ailments. I've had fingers that wouldn't bend, a knee that was too painful to walk on for months, a constant pain in my shoulder for the last 2 years (which is at last beginning to diminish with careful management), etc. etc.

 

The good news is that it's manageable. When I first suffered a painful wrist after years of mousing, that clicked and clunked whenever I moved it, I switched to using the other hand (and bought a more ergonomic mouse at the same time). It didn't take very long to get used to it and now I just switch hands every time I feel that the one I'm using has had long enough. If you do this before you get any pain or twinges, both hands will recover quickly and keep going for many years. I also change my position in the chair frequently, rest my leg on something off the ground (I don't know if sitting in a computer chair can cause DVT but it can certainly hamper circulation), and also stand up frequently and go and do something else around the house.

 

As much as possible while working, keep your body relaxed and supple. If possible, go out for a walk every day. A bit of fresh air and exercise and your body very quickly forgets that it was tensed up over a computer.

 

Alan

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Hi Sparks,

 

If you enjoy all types of photography, have you tried a diversion by entering National and International Salons and Exhibitions? As self-employed, I do stock to keep the wolf from the door, but I do enjoy testing myself against other exhibitors participating at these levels. I regard this imagery as distinctly separate from stock as I doubt if some of it would even pass QC. But, it is another avenue to enjoy if you so wish and something else to consider when out shooting stock. Variety is the spice of life!

 

Jim. :)

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I rarely use a mouse, only for CGI work. I had the onset of RSI and aches/pains years ago and got a Wacom tablet/pen. Also I buy the best computer chairs I can get, operator chairs rated for 24 hours. Also I have frequent tea breaks, even if just to reheat the cuppa that gone cold.  Pace yourself and it's a lot easier.

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Thanks for all the replies and enjoying them. Gleaning some good ideas!! :)

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I retired a couple of years or so ago. My wildlife photography had ended and my commercial photography was on the decline, as was that of others I knew. I was pleased to be out of the chasing jobs aspect of freelancing. It came at a good time.
Similar to Martin above, I just photograph what I want now and also went mirrorless. I use a small Fuji outfit. So that's both a weight of my mind and my shoulder.

On a boring UK finance note, any income you receive over £10,500 will be taxed at 20%. I wasn't happy to be issued with a PAYE code so one of my my pensions could be taxed at source, the one from a company I worked for, for 18 years several decades ago. The pre election budget may change this but I'm not holding my breath. If your income is less than around £13000(Single status) or £1780(Couple) You should be able to get working TAX credits see Government policy could also change on this, I would say innevitably change.

My personal circumstances are probably different from yours, as in I've "Dropped out" somewhat, as I did in 1970. I've also increased my Buddhist practice in preparation for the inevitable, another result of the 1970's. It's an interesting time and gives me a freedom I thought I'd never get back to. I mention this as you are in the same age group as me and may have trodden similar paths.
Enjoy your retirement, you've earned it and if you've got silver hair you've got one over on me ;-)

 

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I turned official "retirement" age (65 in Canada) earlier this year, and after looking at my miserable pensions, I realized that I will never be able to retire (not even sure what that word means). In addition to photography, I tutor high school students as I have a checkered teaching background as well. I used to do a lot of freelance writing and have considered getting back into it. However, given the current state of the publishing industry, I'm thinking that it ain't worth the grief.

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I thought the pensioners in Cananda was being paid more then anywhere else. Thats what your government leads us to believe anyway.

I turned official "retirement" age (65 in Canada) earlier this year, and after looking at my miserable pensions, I realized that I will never be able to retire (not even sure what that word means). In addition to photography, I tutor high school students as I have a checkered teaching background as well. I used to do a lot of freelance writing and have considered getting back into it. However, given the current state of the publishing industry, I'm thinking that it ain't worth the grief.

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In University I was an amateur photographer. Then I became a professional photographer. I retired at 60, and again became an amateur photographer.

 

Amateur photographer is more fun. Retired is a mindset. You have to ignore that guilty feeling when you are frittering away your time enjoying yourself.

 

Like writing this post.

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I retired in 2012.  Freedom 56.  Government scientist for 31 years.

I don't go for the "always on - small camera" thing.  I go for planned outings, whether in my own city, or abroad.  I do at least two larger photo trips per year, plus taking my camera gear to "vacations" and travel for other reasons.

On another note, now I can drive at a leisurely pace and enjoy the ride with all my CDs on a chip.

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I thought the pensioners in Cananda was being paid more then anywhere else. Thats what your government leads us to believe anyway.

I turned official "retirement" age (65 in Canada) earlier this year, and after looking at my miserable pensions, I realized that I will never be able to retire (not even sure what that word means). In addition to photography, I tutor high school students as I have a checkered teaching background as well. I used to do a lot of freelance writing and have considered getting back into it. However, given the current state of the publishing industry, I'm thinking that it ain't worth the grief.

 

 

In my experience, the Canadian retail sector is full of OAP's who are trying to supplement their income in a country where poverty is very visible.

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WORK!  However did I find the time to go to work?  Been retired for 11 years now and still as busy as ever doing what I want to do.

 

Allan

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I thought the pensioners in Cananda was being paid more then anywhere else. Thats what your government leads us to believe anyway.

I turned official "retirement" age (65 in Canada) earlier this year, and after looking at my miserable pensions, I realized that I will never be able to retire (not even sure what that word means). In addition to photography, I tutor high school students as I have a checkered teaching background as well. I used to do a lot of freelance writing and have considered getting back into it. However, given the current state of the publishing industry, I'm thinking that it ain't worth the grief.

 

 

Canadian government pensions (we have two) are probably higher than those in the USA (I don't know anything about the UK, though). However, the cost of living in Vancouver, where I am, is so high that it would be virtually impossible to get by on government pensions alone. Our current federal government is full of you-know-what BTW.

Edited by John Mitchell

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I thought the pensioners in Cananda was being paid more then anywhere else. Thats what your government leads us to believe anyway.

I turned official "retirement" age (65 in Canada) earlier this year, and after looking at my miserable pensions, I realized that I will never be able to retire (not even sure what that word means). In addition to photography, I tutor high school students as I have a checkered teaching background as well. I used to do a lot of freelance writing and have considered getting back into it. However, given the current state of the publishing industry, I'm thinking that it ain't worth the grief.

 

 

In my experience, the Canadian retail sector is full of OAP's who are trying to supplement their income in a country where poverty is very visible.

 

 

Yes, the gap between the rich and the poor is getting wider, as it is in most countries,

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Good morning All.

 

Though I've been an Alamy contributor a fair while and have enjoyed reading forum this is my 1st post.

 

in 4 weeks time I reach UK retirement age and will "slow up". Having suffered "Frozen shoulder" with hours at submissions & keywording at the computer

my family are quite happy for me to call it quits.

 

I don't intend to but will seek a more balanced approach.

 

So to those out there of "Silver hair Variety" ...what do you do???

 

(I just tried a week's leave out my self employment schedule and was bored out my mind.....but I do wish to dispel the aches and pains of computer usage.)

 

 

I look forward to your replies.

 

 

 

I retired 4 years ago and spent a good deal of the latter part of my working life in front of a computer.

 

I don't use a mouse, far preferring a tracker ball. There is less movement involved and you never run into your coffee mug or keypad etc. There is a steep learning curve, but, once mastered, there is no going back. You might also consider a tablet?

 

Like Martin above I have almost hung up the heavy DSLR kit and carry instead a light weight mirrorless NEX 6. My days of lugging heavy stuff up Helvellyn are, alas, long gone!

 

Re boredom - most of the year this is not an issue, but in the bleak months of January and February a low cost jaunt to somewhere warm provides a useful fillip and photo opportunity. The Canary Islands almost guarantee sunshine in Feb, and, at that time of year, there are plenty of good value deals available. It's not much more expensive than staying at home and heating the house!

 

Other low cost activities - I cycle with a group of fellow oldies, do volunteer work and cultivate an allotment. Walking is free and gets you out of the house, while you should make best use of the concessionary bus pass while it still exists!

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I've retired a few years later than my official retirement age but had to give work up in the end.  I found the daily early morning drive from Canterbury to London along the M2 etc too much - and frightening at times.  Driving standards have dropped to a worrying level on motorways in the rush hours.

 

However, I've cut my cloth to fit my suit etc and can manage financially but with little spare.  We moved for retirement in advance and bought a small two bedroom retirement flat four minutes walk from Canterbury City centre.  Bus station just down the road and free bus travel so I can get to almost anywhere in Kent free of charge.  Just me with my Sony RX100 in my pocket and I'm easily set for a day's uncluttered stock photography.

 

With regard to using a mouse, I stopped using one years ago and went over to a Logitech track-ball - works fine for my needs and takes up minimum desk space as it stays in one place.  I'm tempted to try a Wacom Tablet if I can find a good one on Ebay.

 

I'm fortunate in that I planned long term for retirement and associated low income.  I have many interests and am never bored.  I'm quite often still up at 2am reading, editing photos or typing correspondence but can get up in the morning when it suits - almost back to my teen habits :D

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Hi Sparks. I retired from the military at 55, thankfully with a good pension after 33 years of service.

 

I think the key thing about retirement is to always have something nice to look forward to on the calendar. For me, it's mainly travel  - abroad or at home - and that gives me most of the photo opportunities that I'm interested in. In between trips, I enjoy growing vegetables on a small patch of land I bought from the local farmer.

 

When the weather turns grim and the days are short, it's time for processing/uploading/key-wording the backlog of images for Alamy.

 

And now it's nearly time for the pre-xmas trip to Poland. How did I ever have time to work...?

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I have moved to a mirrorless system and like Pearl I am working at the photography and writing I want to do.

 

I still need an income but I have stopped chasing gigs - it is about enough money to follow my enthusiasms (photography, writing, good food, slow travel) rather than acquiring "stuff". Funnily the gigs have started to come anyway ;) I still treat it as work but it is work for pleasure rather than maximum cash. As mother said "Martin won't retire - he will just do something different"; indeed I have, I have returned to an old passion: words and pictures.

I too have moved to mirrorless selling off all of my Canon DSLR equipment. My injury was an impinged shoulder and rotary cuff issue. Too much sitting is bad for our health regardless of keywording. Set a timer to get up and walk around,get your circulation going for 5-10mins every hour. I've also found I like the fact that I am going less for quantity and thinking out my shoots a bit different so I don't come home with 500 photos to deal with in post processing.

 

L

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Good morning All.

 

Though I've been an Alamy contributor a fair while and have enjoyed reading forum this is my 1st post.

 

in 4 weeks time I reach UK retirement age and will "slow up". Having suffered "Frozen shoulder" with hours at submissions & keywording at the computer

my family are quite happy for me to call it quits.

 

I don't intend to but will seek a more balanced approach.

 

So to those out there of "Silver hair Variety" ...what do you do???

 

(I just tried a week's leave out my self employment schedule and was bored out my mind.....but I do wish to dispel the aches and pains of computer usage.)

 

 

I look forward to your replies.

 

Sparks!  (a nautical term for those from the radio room at sea)

Hello Sparks,

 

Sorry for your trouble.

 

One solution, maybe, would be to shoot your pictures as you do and then get some helpful/kind young person to do the work on the computer? You would be giving helpful advice and the youngster would be learning technique?

 

Not sure if this would be 'cost effective' but I have engaged youngsters here in Ireland on a similar basis. In fact it counted towards their Leaving Certificate in terms of 'work experience'. Quid pro quo.

 

Best of luck anyway. 

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Like Linda I am trying to concentrate on quality over quantity. I am also trying to work more the way I did with film (and doing my own printing) and aim to get everything right in camera so there is minimal post-processing.

 

The first minimises the keywording etc and the second reduces the fine tuning of not quite right exposures etc. When I was covering events (mostly equestrian) I wanted images that could be printed on same grade of paper with same exposure - one test strip for 3-4 films. Otherwise it made for a long night if I had to individually print100+ proofs overnight for the second day of a weekend event.

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I was forced to retire just before my 50th birthday this year when a large and inconveniently located benign brain tumour curtailed my medical practice. My pension is tiny since I entered medical school late after doing a few other things first (including visual perception, optics and image processing, hence my interests now) and so my length of NHS service was short.

 

So I'm slowly building up my photography portfolio for stock and when I've got my head around being retired at 50 I might start doing other photographic things (like commissions) as well. 

 

One thing I would say is that life is short, you never know what's around the corner, and you must absolutely do what you enjoy doing. 

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