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I have been using a Sony RX100 as my walk around camera for more than a year now.  I am happy with the picture quality it produces and more importantly I sell images taken with  it.


 


However I have two issues with the RX100.  One is the lack of a viewfinder.  The other is that I can’t leave the camer on (not longer than 30min).  Because of these, I often miss opportunities which require quick reaction.


 


I read many forum threads here about Fuji X series how good they are, which made me think that it might be an answer to my problems. (or am I wrong to think that?)


 


I am interested in a Fuji X100(s) or a XE1(2).  Which would you recommend and why?  The usage of this camera would be for general photography (editorial contents if you like, people, places, etc).  I have no intention of replacing my DSLR with it.


 


I am totally unfamiliar with the electronic viewfinder.  How is it to use?  


 


I look forward to your recommendations.


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No experience with the models you mention but I do use the X-T1 and find the viewfinder to be excellent.

 

Fuji X series, I've had a couple (X-E1/X-E2) generally very good.

 

Allan

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As you have no intetion of replacing the DSLR kit, and if it has to be a carry anywhere pocketable camera then I would suggest either the Fuji X100 which is a real bargain now or the faster focusing  X100s.

 

I have the X100 & an X-M1 (basically a budget compact X-Pro1 minus optical finder but with a flip rear screen). The X100 is always with me, in my coat pocket or in the footwell of my car, and it's actually very fast focusing between 1m & infinity especially with the latest firmware update.

 

I've had my X100 since it was released and it has never let me down, and have no worries about using it in the rain, not that fuji claim any weather sealing for this model, but it's so presicely made that it has survived weather that has crippled my supposidly weather sealed nikon D7000.

The optical hybrid finder is fabulous, and can be switched to Electronic TTL viewing with the flick of the toggle switch located on the front upper body and easilly accessible with shutter finger. You really only need it when your doing closeups, or low light stuff.

 

Here's a quick grap shot of this roller blader who came round the corner real fast, my camera was in my coat pocket but I quickly pulled it out, switched it on as I raised it to my eye, and pressed the button, the little X100 got the job done:

man-on-roller-blades-carrying-bouquet-of

Parm

Edited by Bhandol
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The X-E1 is at bargain basement prices at the moment. In fact, I've seen an X-E1/18-55mm lens kit for only £80 more than the lens alone. 

 

The X-E1 is said to have slow AF and a laggy EVF, both of which have been improved in the X-E2 (and X-T1). Others disagree say that the EVF and AF are OK with the latest firmware.

 

I already use an X100S along with my Nikon DSLR gear and am in the process of rationalising my Nikon kit (i.e selling some of it off) and buying into the Fuji X system (X-E2 more than likely to start with) because I love using the X100S so much. The images it produces are great too. I'm tempted by the X100T but will probably hold off for now.

 

My rationale for going for the X-E2 over the X-T1 is that I suspect that there'll be an upgrade to the XT-1 and X-Pro1 within the next year and with what I want to shoot, the X-E2 will be enough. I'll more than likely get the X-E1 too since they're virtually giving it away with a decent kit lens.

 

As for your decision, if you can, check out what focal length (converted to full frame equivalent focal length (EFL)) you mostly shoot your current Sony at. If you shoot mostly at ~35mm EFL, get the X100/S/T. If you shoot at a variety of focal lengths with no particular preference, get the X-E1/2 with lenses that cover the focal lengths you shoot at with your Sony.

 

This is easily done in something like Lightroom.

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A few other points while I think about it.

 

I don't use it too often but some prefer the optical VF over the electronic VF in the X100 series and X-Pro1. 90% of the time, I use the EVF anyway so the lack of an optical VF on the X-E2 won't bother me.

 

The second point, and a killer point for me, is that because it has a leaf rather than focal plane shutter, I can get insane sync speeds on the X100S.

 

So e.g., 1/1000s at F/2 ISO 200 plus ND filter engaged kills a bright midday sky but lets me light a subject, even with the tiny built-in flash. The X-E1/2 cameras don't have leaf shutters.

Edited by Russell Watkins

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The Fuji vs. Fuji site offers some interesting comparisons:

 

http://www.fujivsfuji.com/x100s-vs-23mm-14/

 

http://www.fujivsfuji.com/x100t-vs-x100s-vs-x100/

 

http://www.fujivsfuji.com/x-e1-vs-x-e2/

 

One thing about the electronic viewfinder is that it's power hungry, so you'll want to have spare batteries. The hybrid viewfinder allows saving juice by mostly relying on the optical option (which I've read but have no experience using). Also, if you plan to use both at some point, note that the X100 series takes different batteries than the others, which means carrying two charges and two sets of spares. I think the X100's 23mm lens competes very well against the 18mm or 27mm options, although they make it possible to use the XE1/2 in a way that's equally portable.
 

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Thank you, Bhandol and Russell, for your detailed recommendations, experiences and suggestions.  It's really difficult to decide between the two models both of which seem so excelent in their own rights.

 

Thank you, Don.  It's very interesting comparisons, which will be very helpful for me.

Edited by SFL
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Sorry, double entry 

Edited by SFL

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I am having the same thoughts about what to buy. I am going for the X100. My thoughts;

 

1. Fixed lens / fixed cost - not having to worry about another lens.

2. I am keeping my DSLR gear so we have all of the focal lengths covered on that.

3. Need something small and light.

4. Needs to be high enough quality for Alamy.

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You're welcome Sung - let us know which you go for in the end.

 

I knew I am a wide-angle shooter most of the time, but I tried your suggestion to see what focal length I use most (it was easy to figure it out with Lightroom filter function).  65% of Sony RX100 shots were between 28-35mm (35mm equiv).  At the moment, I am leaning towards X100S.

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I am having the same thoughts about what to buy. I am going for the X100. My thoughts;

 

1. Fixed lens / fixed cost - not having to worry about another lens.

2. I am keeping my DSLR gear so we have all of the focal lengths covered on that.

3. Need something small and light.

4. Needs to be high enough quality for Alamy.

 

You have similar thoughts as I do.  :)

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I am having the same thoughts about what to buy. I am going for the X100. My thoughts;

 

1. Fixed lens / fixed cost - not having to worry about another lens.

2. I am keeping my DSLR gear so we have all of the focal lengths covered on that.

3. Need something small and light.

4. Needs to be high enough quality for Alamy.

 

You have similar thoughts as I do.  :)

 

 

Great minds eh.

 

The problem for me is that I shoot live music and my focal lengths go from 24 - 600+. Having seen some of the Fujis with longs lens on them I think I am going to stick to DSLR for that. 

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Fuji X series users, how do you find the EVF?  Easy to use?  Is it a battery drainer?  

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I got a Wasabi cordless charger, which I like better than Fuji's, and carry three spares. Unless you're shooting videos or are really trigger happy, it's more than enough for a busy day of shooting.

About the EVF, plusses and minuses. It bothers me to have to watch a little animation telling me that the camera is storing images when I could be framing my next shot. More than anything, that's what I miss about my DSLR. The X-Pro1 would offer that (by switching to the optical viewfinder while the electronics are busy) and no doubt the X-Pro2 will offer that and much more.

Edited by DDoug
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Thanks, DDoug.  Perhaps a spare battery or two will be enough for me in that case. 

 

In an ideal world,  X pro might be the solution but I can't justify the cost.  Have to be sensible....    ;)

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I agree, SFL. Even in the old film days, I preferred to change cameras rather than change lenses in the field. So I carried a three-lens, two-body kit.

With Fuji, I've decided that the X-E1 is good enough and cheap enough that I can carry a couple or few lens-body combinations and not have to change lenses or, for that matter, worry much about spotting dust afterward.

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I must admit - i did not comment on this thread in the past as i could not quite reconcile it... The X100 and XE are such different beasts that I am not sure they bear comparison.

 

You have to decide (based on what you shoot) which type of camera you want / need, fixed lens, or interchangeable. I can often be seen carrying both my X100 and X1-Pro, (and in the past, have carried X1P, XT and X100 all with different lens)...

 

I can never remember having to wait for the X1-Pro to storing a shot stopping the VF, it just carries on (unless you fill up the buffer), the X100 on the other hand does pause if you shoot a burst (mines a Mk1, the S or T might have sorted this)...

 

Why don't you just try both of them and see what feels right? After all thats what counts, how it feels... I personally don't care what others think, its how the camera feels in my hand, what it shoots for me and wether it does the job, and only you can decided that by trying them....

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I must admit - i did not comment on this thread in the past as i could not quite reconcile it... The X100 and XE are such different beasts that I am not sure they bear comparison.

 

You have to decide (based on what you shoot) which type of camera you want / need, fixed lens, or interchangeable. I can often be seen carrying both my X100 and X1-Pro, (and in the past, have carried X1P, XT and X100 all with different lens)...

 

I can never remember having to wait for the X1-Pro to storing a shot stopping the VF, it just carries on (unless you fill up the buffer), the X100 on the other hand does pause if you shoot a burst (mines a Mk1, the S or T might have sorted this)...

 

Why don't you just try both of them and see what feels right? After all thats what counts, how it feels... I personally don't care what others think, its how the camera feels in my hand, what it shoots for me and wether it does the job, and only you can decided that by trying them....

 

Thank you, Julie for sharing your experience and advice.

 

I think you are right.  I will have to go to London to see if I can try both as unfortunately there are no camera shops where I live.  They've all gone.  :( The problem is there aren't many X100 or X100S around.

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