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I had a sale in August, a fairly unusual 1970 group photo of the Monty Python gang, for $82.70. Not great, but still. Today it was re-funded and a new sale of $79.18 showed up with exactly the same usage. A difference  of $3.52!

Nudge, nudge, say no more, say no more.

Rolf

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$3.52?

 

. . . luxury!! . . .

 

dd

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I've basically given up trying to understand refunds. I've had the same two images refunded and resold twice during the past few weeks with minor changes to the terms. One just has to go with the flow these days.

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I've basically given up trying to understand refunds. I've had the same two images refunded and resold twice during the past few weeks with minor changes to the terms. One just has to go with the flow these days.

I agree John. I had a nice streak of 3 or 4 months with no refunds and then three just recently. All were price adjustments, not total refunds.

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The value of the sale currency changed by $3.52 between now, when the sale was rebilled, and August when the sale was made. In other words the selling currency was converted and worth $82.70 in August, but was worth only $79.18 when converted today. This can happen if a sale has to be rebilled. Sometime it works in your favour.

 

The $3.52 is not dead, it is only resting.

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The value of the sale currency changed by $3.52 between now, when the sale was rebilled, and August when the sale was made. In other words the selling currency was converted and worth $82.70 in August, but was worth only $79.18 when converted today. This can happen if a sale has to be rebilled. Sometime it works in your favour.
 
The $3.52 is not dead, it is only resting.

 

 

Isn't the selling currency always USD?

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I had one last year sold for $44.64 and refunded.   Sold again for $37.94, saving $6.70.

 

Odd thing was, although all the other license were identical, the first sale was USA and second Brazil

Quite interesting! Last year I also had a sale to 'Brazil' for a similar amount ($37.62 gross; not a refund; distributor sale; retail book with low print run). When preparing my DACS claim, I noted that the region specified in the table that can be downloaded under "net revenue" was actually "US". Thus I wondered if I should opt out of distribution in Brazil. Can you see if your Brazillian sale was licensed for use in Brazil or elsewhere?

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The details of my sale were:

 

Country: Brazil
Usage: Editorial
Media: Textbook - print and e-book
Print run: up to 5,000
Placement: Inside
Image Size: 1/2 page
Start: 01 June 2013
End: 01 June 2014

 

The original sale as identical except country was United States and print run 10,000.   Both were distributor sales.

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Many thanks, Peter! Details of my license:

 

Country: Brazil
Usage: Editorial
Media: Retail book - print only
Print run: up to 5,000
Placement: Inside
Image Size: 1/4 page
Start: 01 June 2013
End: 01 June 2014

 

The licenses are not identical so our images were for different books. I've never found mine either.

 

From inspecting the licensing details of other pictures, I infer that "country" is just jargon for the location of the audience of a publication (for example, "french speaking countries" or "rest of world"), and does not necessarily indicate the country in which an image was licensed/published. The latter appears to be specified by the "region" . (The "region" is not given in the 'summary of items sold', but it can be viewed in the downloadable spreadsheet, it's in the last column). For my license the "country" was "Brazil" and the "region" was "US". I think that means that the image was licensed/published in the USA for a book with a print run of 5000 for the Brazilian market...

 

(edited; I had overlooked that PJ's license was for textbook and mine for a retail book)

Edited by H_J
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Many thanks, Peter! Details of my license:

 

Country: Brazil

Usage: Editorial

Media: Retail book - print only

Print run: up to 5,000

Placement: Inside

Image Size: 1/4 page

Start: 01 June 2013

End: 01 June 2014

 

The licenses are not identical so our images were for different books. I've never found mine either.

 

From inspecting the licensing details of other pictures, I infer that "country" is just jargon for the location of the audience of a publication (for example, "french speaking countries" or "rest of world"), and does not necessarily indicate the country in which an image was licensed/published. The latter appears to be specified by the "region" . (The "region" is not given in the 'summary of items sold', but it can be viewed in the downloadable spreadsheet, it's in the last column). For my license the "country" was "Brazil" and the "region" was "US". I think that means that the image was licensed/published in the USA for a book with a print run of 5000 for the Brazilian market...

 

(edited; I had overlooked that PJ's license was for textbook and mine for a retail book)

 

I forgot that "region" appears on the spreadsheet.

 

Like yours mine was Country: Brazil and Region: US

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Many thanks, Peter! Details of my license:

 

Country: Brazil

Usage: Editorial

Media: Retail book - print only

Print run: up to 5,000

Placement: Inside

Image Size: 1/4 page

Start: 01 June 2013

End: 01 June 2014

 

The licenses are not identical so our images were for different books. I've never found mine either.

 

From inspecting the licensing details of other pictures, I infer that "country" is just jargon for the location of the audience of a publication (for example, "french speaking countries" or "rest of world"), and does not necessarily indicate the country in which an image was licensed/published. The latter appears to be specified by the "region" . (The "region" is not given in the 'summary of items sold', but it can be viewed in the downloadable spreadsheet, it's in the last column). For my license the "country" was "Brazil" and the "region" was "US". I think that means that the image was licensed/published in the USA for a book with a print run of 5000 for the Brazilian market...

 

(edited; I had overlooked that PJ's license was for textbook and mine for a retail book)

 

I forgot that "region" appears on the spreadsheet.

 

Like yours mine was Country: Brazil and Region: US

 

US-based publishers do translate English-language textbooks to Portuguese and publish them in Brasil. Could this be the case here?

 

GI

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Many thanks, Peter! Details of my license:

 

Country: Brazil

Usage: Editorial

Media: Retail book - print only

Print run: up to 5,000

Placement: Inside

Image Size: 1/4 page

Start: 01 June 2013

End: 01 June 2014

 

The licenses are not identical so our images were for different books. I've never found mine either.

 

From inspecting the licensing details of other pictures, I infer that "country" is just jargon for the location of the audience of a publication (for example, "french speaking countries" or "rest of world"), and does not necessarily indicate the country in which an image was licensed/published. The latter appears to be specified by the "region" . (The "region" is not given in the 'summary of items sold', but it can be viewed in the downloadable spreadsheet, it's in the last column). For my license the "country" was "Brazil" and the "region" was "US". I think that means that the image was licensed/published in the USA for a book with a print run of 5000 for the Brazilian market...

 

(edited; I had overlooked that PJ's license was for textbook and mine for a retail book)

 

I forgot that "region" appears on the spreadsheet.

 

Like yours mine was Country: Brazil and Region: US

 

US-based publishers do translate English-language textbooks to Portuguese and publish them in Brasil. Could this be the case here?

 

GI

 

Thanks very much! I dont't think your suggestion applies here. My image hadn't been licensed before, or since. And it was for a retail book. While the licensing details suggest a very specialized book, my image was of parasol mushrooms . These are very common in Europe, but appear not to occur in Brazil (in an Alamy search). I'd really like to see  how the image was used. Perhaps, in a  Field Guide to European Fungi, first published in Brazillian Portuguese? :)

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