Jump to content

Recommended Posts

I don't know much about commercial photography jargon, so I'm hoping someone can enlighten me. What exactly does "talent" mean? When a photo buyer says "all recognizable talent must be released," who/what does that refer to? Are only paid or unpaid models "talent"? Or does it refer to anyone in the picture? If I happen to show up by chance in someone's image as an innocent bystander, would I be "talent"? Would my unsuspecting dog also be "talent"?

 

Thanks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I worked for a commercial photographer in my early twenties and yes, all models were referred to as "talent". So I would assume that that person is referring anyone in the photo. It is a silly name, for sure.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I worked for a commercial photographer in my early twenties and yes, all models were referred to as "talent". So I would assume that that person is referring anyone in the photo. It is a silly name, for sure.

 

That's what I figured -- i.e. anyone who happens to appear in the photo, models and even untalented types like myself.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The meaning of the noun "talent" used as "a person possessing talent" is in Webs dictionary, so it's not just jargon. Using "creative" as a noun ("I'll get my creative to do it") has always ruffled my feathers, but that term too is in Webs now.  :o

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The meaning of the noun "talent" used as "a person possessing talent" is in Webs dictionary, so it's not just jargon. Using "creative" as a noun ("I'll get my creative to do it") has always ruffled my feathers, but that term too is in Webs now.  :o

 

Yes, I've never liked "creatives" either. It implies that everyone else isn't creative, which is hogwash (whatever that is).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well the author of that requirement was showing no talent with English language. It is a meaningless statement except in that closeted talentless bubble.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Too true, Martin.  As a former copy editor I tend to be conservative in my own usage and punctuation. But English, yours and mine, are living languages and continue to change. I wonder if that's why they speak Latin (a dead language) at the Vatican . . . and I wonder if they still do? A friend in Rome told me that our newest Pope likes to speak in Italian.  And is it now okay for me to begin a sentence with "but?"  :)

Edited by Ed Rooney

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The main reason I asked this question is because I recently saw a request for an image elsewhere in which the buyer stated that "all recognizable talent must be released." I found this odd because it was a street photography subject that would inevitably have some miscellaneous "talent" hanging around. I won't be submitting images for the request even though I have several appropriate shots. Running around asking everyone in sight to sign model releases just doesn't appeal. At least I now know what "talent" is. Thanks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Talent is the US term for actors, musicians, models, and other people in various entertainment businesses.

 

wim

 

edit: Creative is the US term for fully released images.

Edited by wiskerke

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sometimes you hear sports commentators refer to the "talent positions" on, say, a (US) football team--generally meaning anyone who carries, throws or catches the ball by design. But I wouldn't want to suggest to a lineman from either side of the ball that he was bereft of talent.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Talent is the US term for actors, musicians, models, and other people in various entertainment businesses.

 

wim

 

edit: Creative is the US term for fully released images.

 

Wim, people who do something considered to be "creative" are also now often referred to as "creatives." Using verbs as nouns has become quite popular these days.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I worked for a commercial photographer in my early twenties and yes, all models were referred to as "talent". So I would assume that that person is referring anyone in the photo. It is a silly name, for sure.

Me too. In the '60's I was a fashion / advertising photographer and as well as releases from the models, we also obtained ones from the makeup people / stylists / cooks (for food photography) and from sometimes set designers and model makers etc. etc. The guy I worked for was from the USA and was used to this from his work there. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

...Using verbs as nouns has become quite popular these days.

 

 

I love verbing nouns.

 

(© some cartoon some time ago).

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

...Using verbs as nouns has become quite popular these days.

 

 

I love verbing nouns.

 

(© some cartoon some time ago).

 

 

Yes, but it's a beautiful sunny day here, and I should be out stocking rather than foruming.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.