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I'll take a stab at it: Cockapoo (cocker spaniel poodle mix) puppy. The shape of the muzzle doesn't seem quite right, but maybe this will help keep the thread near the top until Ed checks in.

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(Ohmygod, I'm an expert!  :o)  

 

A Cockapoo would be my guess, too. It's hard to be certain about the Cocker Spaniel half, but one half is surely a small Poodle. Looking at your very charming shot once more, Jill, I would label he/her a Cockapoo. Designer breeds are most always half poodle because Poodles do not shed hair. The other thing is we have a better chance at having a healthier animal by not continuing the inbreeding. Also, I think the Cockapoo is the most common designer breed. 

 

Some of the best 'people' I know are dogs.  :)

Edited by Ed Rooney
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I'm not an expert on dog breeds but I have two Cockapoo's and they dont look like that.

 

The ears are too straight for a Cockapoo in my opinion.

I can understand how it might be a part poodle but not part Cocker Spaniel.

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I would love to see a snap of your dogs, RW.  :)

 

The ears look spot on to me. The muzzle looks a bit pointed, as CLSI might have been pointing out, a Poodle muzzle more than a Spaniel. This looks like a young dog but not really a puppy . . . and she/he has a lot of Poodle in her/him. Mixed breeds, being a mix, don't all look the same.

 

I will bet my shoddy, paper-thin, unearned reputation that this is a Cockapoo.  :unsure:

 

Edo

Edited by Ed Rooney
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Thanks for all the input. People weren't supposed to bring any dogs that were not entered in the show, but obviously this little guy managed to sneak in. I'll go for the Cockapoo.

 

As an owner of a Coonador dog (Coon hound/Labrador cross), I like the mixed breeds. The lab half likes to pick things up and just carry them around (then get me to swap them for a cookie). The Coon hound side isn't quite so nice when it kicks into action. Been witness to that side of the family a couple of times.

 

Jill

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Shot this little guy at the dog show last weekend. Not quite sure of the breed.

 

E7H5FA.jpg

 

 

Jill

 

From the look on its face, I'd wager that she/he ever so slightly misunderstood your intention to "shoot" . . .

 

dd

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I am writing this with a borrowed labradoodle at my feet and I would say the muzzle is too narrow and the hair on the ears looks wrong. However, Monty is 18 months so may have grown into his face :)

 

Either way, far too much energy for a regular dog........

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as Edo says, cross breeds will present variably. We have a lovely black Labradoodle bitch who is curly haired and sheds like mad. We have met others who are quite different. She is so smart she makes the older Dalmatian look like a complete dolt. Even with a breed like a Dalmatian there are variations. This male is very short on spots and has a deep chest and trim abdomen. Stands taller than most. Is he really a Dalmatian? He is from Norfolk and we have encountered similar Dalmatians up on the beach walks. Both Dogs are rescue so pedigree is unknown.

 

I'm surprised the long hairs on the puppy's ears look right, but I can't see how anyone would challenge a caption of Cockapoo. You could be wrong but it's a fair call. If you want to play safe, just put Cockapoo in the Keywords and leave it off the caption.

 

Speaking of Dalmatians, how did they get to be associated with American fire engines? Pick up a jigsaw puzzle of an older Fire engine & crew and there is bound to be a Dalmatian sitting beside the driver. They have a tradition as Carriage Dogs in the UK, but no connection to fire brigades

Edited by Robert M Estall
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Who the hell gave Ed red arrows for both his comments? :blink: Aren't we entitled to give our opinions anymore, whether or not you - whoever you are - agree? Shouldn't you be thankful instead that others take time to help their colleagues .... ????

Neutralised both underhand, sly reds! :angry:

 

Cheers,

Philippe

 

There are one or two cowardly tossers around still, but thankfully they are grossly outnumbered by those of us (yourself included) who cancel them when we see them . . . I seriously advocate Alamy publish a log of who posts red arrows every now and again . . . after all, if they feel strongly enough to fire off red arrows toward any particular posts, they surely won't mind the rest of us seeing how they feel.

 

dd

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as Edo says, cross breeds will present variably. We have a lovely black Labradoodle bitch who is curly haired and sheds like mad. We have met others who are quite different. She is so smart she makes the older Dalmatian look like a complete dolt. Even with a breed like a Dalmatian there are variations. This male is very short on spots and has a deep chest and trim abdomen. Stands taller than most. Is he really a Dalmatian? He is from Norfolk and we have encountered similar Dalmatians up on the beach walks. Both Dogs are rescue so pedigree is unknown.

 

I'm surprised the long hairs on the puppy's ears look right, but I can't see how anyone would challenge a caption of Cockapoo. You could be wrong but it's a fair call. If you want to play safe, just put Cockapoo in the Keywords and leave it off the caption.

 

Speaking of Dalmatians, how did they get to be associated with American fire engines? Pick up a jigsaw puzzle of an older Fire engine & crew and there is bound to be a Dalmatian sitting beside the driver. They have a tradition as Carriage Dogs in the UK, but no connection to fire brigades

 

We saw quite a few Dalmatians when in Croatia, and I thought I knew the reasons given for their association with firefighters--and Wikipedia verfied it :-). To do (it is believed) with their affinity to horses, allowing them to run alongside or directly in front to help clear the crowd (although if a set of galloping horses didn't get you running for cover I can't see a dog or two making much difference). But . . . I wish I didn't read the full Wikipedia article . . . the Dalmatian Club of America's recommendation for deaf puppies (of which there are many) is euthanasia . . . the things we do . . .

 

dd

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Who the hell gave Ed red arrows for both his comments? :blink: Aren't we entitled to give our opinions anymore, whether or not you - whoever you are - agree? Shouldn't you be thankful instead that others take time to help their colleagues .... ????

Neutralised both underhand, sly reds! :angry:

 

Cheers,

Philippe

 

There are one or two cowardly tossers around still, but thankfully they are grossly outnumbered by those of us (yourself included) who cancel them when we see them . . . I seriously advocate Alamy publish a log of who posts red arrows every now and again . . . after all, if they feel strongly enough to fire off red arrows toward any particular posts, they surely won't mind the rest of us seeing how they feel.

 

dd

 

 

I did not touch the red arrow button, but I think both of you totally miss the point of the red and green arrows.

 

wim

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Who the hell gave Ed red arrows for both his comments? :blink: Aren't we entitled to give our opinions anymore, whether or not you - whoever you are - agree? Shouldn't you be thankful instead that others take time to help their colleagues .... ????

Neutralised both underhand, sly reds! :angry:

 

Cheers,

Philippe

 

There are one or two cowardly tossers around still, but thankfully they are grossly outnumbered by those of us (yourself included) who cancel them when we see them . . . I seriously advocate Alamy publish a log of who posts red arrows every now and again . . . after all, if they feel strongly enough to fire off red arrows toward any particular posts, they surely won't mind the rest of us seeing how they feel.

 

dd

 

 

I did not touch the red arrow button, but I think both of you totally miss the point of the red and green arrows.

 

wim

 

 

Trouble is wim sometimes red arrows are given accidentally when using a tablet and scrolling. If you happen to hit the red mark when trying to scroll, you end up with a red arrow on someone. We have asked Alamy to move the red and green markers away from the right edge to no avail.

 

Jill

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Who the hell gave Ed red arrows for both his comments? :blink: Aren't we entitled to give our opinions anymore, whether or not you - whoever you are - agree? Shouldn't you be thankful instead that others take time to help their colleagues .... ????

Neutralised both underhand, sly reds! :angry:

 

Cheers,

Philippe

 

There are one or two cowardly tossers around still, but thankfully they are grossly outnumbered by those of us (yourself included) who cancel them when we see them . . . I seriously advocate Alamy publish a log of who posts red arrows every now and again . . . after all, if they feel strongly enough to fire off red arrows toward any particular posts, they surely won't mind the rest of us seeing how they feel.

 

dd

 

 

I did not touch the red arrow button, but I think both of you totally miss the point of the red and green arrows.

 

wim

 

 

Trouble is wim sometimes red arrows are given accidentally when using a tablet and scrolling. If you happen to hit the red mark when trying to scroll, you end up with a red arrow on someone. We have asked Alamy to move the red and green markers away from the right edge to no avail.

 

Jill

 

 

That may be true.

But what are they there for?

To enable simple Liking or Unliking without much consequence or retribution by board bullies.

Which is a good thing.

Yes having a red arrow is a good thing.

I will even go as far as saying that getting a red arrow is a good thing.

But that may be a Dutch cultural thing ;-)

 

(To find a good quote on this I looked through various descriptions of Dutch culture, mainly aimed at expats. And found many lovely, not lovingly, examples of the typical Dutch rudeness, we call honesty:)

 

- remember that in Dutch culture, a critical approach is a sign of involvement rather than of rejection

- giving compliments is not a part of Dutch business culture

 

And an especially sharp observation:

- In some cases, they expect you to be honest and direct in return. If you detect mistakes in their work and you do not inform them about these mistakes, they might get disappointed with you.

- The Dutch do not necessarily feel ashamed when you inform them of a mistake, and can appreciate that you give them the opportunity to correct and thus improve themselves. The Dutch feel that in the end, one learns from his mistakes. However, expatriates have reported that being direct back to the Dutch doesn't always sit so well. ;-)

 

OK maybe go back on topic. I did learn a thing or two about dogs from this thread:

- there are very cute looking dogs and they are being purposely designed as such. Like the Schnoodle Boodle Maltipoo Pekeapoo and Pomapoos . Even to keep a puppy-like appearance throughout life (the Cava-poo-chon).

- and dog design sometimes fails and you end up with a Labradoodle that does shed.

 

What I missed in the thread was grooming (maybe not the current Chinese way), which may have altered the appearance of the ears.

 

A dog is probably the most non critical animal (Man's Best Friend and all that), so that Dutch culture dictates I'm not a dog person. ;-)

 

wim

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Who the hell gave Ed red arrows for both his comments? :blink: Aren't we entitled to give our opinions anymore, whether or not you - whoever you are - agree? Shouldn't you be thankful instead that others take time to help their colleagues .... ????

Neutralised both underhand, sly reds! :angry:

 

Cheers,

Philippe

 

There are one or two cowardly tossers around still, but thankfully they are grossly outnumbered by those of us (yourself included) who cancel them when we see them . . . I seriously advocate Alamy publish a log of who posts red arrows every now and again . . . after all, if they feel strongly enough to fire off red arrows toward any particular posts, they surely won't mind the rest of us seeing how they feel.

 

dd

 

 

I did not touch the red arrow button, but I think both of you totally miss the point of the red and green arrows.

 

wim

 

 

Trouble is wim sometimes red arrows are given accidentally when using a tablet and scrolling. If you happen to hit the red mark when trying to scroll, you end up with a red arrow on someone. We have asked Alamy to move the red and green markers away from the right edge to no avail.

 

Jill

 

 

That may be true.

But what are they there for?

To enable simple Liking or Unliking without much consequence or retribution by board bullies.

Which is a good thing.

Yes having a red arrow is a good thing.

I will even go as far as saying that getting a red arrow is a good thing.

But that may be a Dutch cultural thing ;-)

 

(To find a good quote on this I looked through various descriptions of Dutch culture, mainly aimed at expats. And found many lovely, not lovingly, examples of the typical Dutch rudeness, we call honesty:)

 

- remember that in Dutch culture, a critical approach is a sign of involvement rather than of rejection

- giving compliments is not a part of Dutch business culture

 

And an especially sharp observation:

- In some cases, they expect you to be honest and direct in return. If you detect mistakes in their work and you do not inform them about these mistakes, they might get disappointed with you.

- The Dutch do not necessarily feel ashamed when you inform them of a mistake, and can appreciate that you give them the opportunity to correct and thus improve themselves. The Dutch feel that in the end, one learns from his mistakes. However, expatriates have reported that being direct back to the Dutch doesn't always sit so well. ;-)

 

OK maybe go back on topic. I did learn a thing or two about dogs from this thread:

- there are very cute looking dogs and they are being purposely designed as such. Like the Schnoodle Boodle Maltipoo Pekeapoo and Pomapoos . Even to keep a puppy-like appearance throughout life (the Cava-poo-chon).

- and dog design sometimes fails and you end up with a Labradoodle that does shed.

 

What I missed in the thread was grooming (maybe not the current Chinese way), which may have altered the appearance of the ears.

 

A dog is probably the most non critical animal (Man's Best Friend and all that), so that Dutch culture dictates I'm not a dog person. ;-)

 

wim

 

 

Where I come from, if you're going to criticise someone, you don't do it anonymously.

 

With respect Wim, I think you in turn misunderstand the main reason the anonymous use of red arrows is disliked by many herer: of course negative feedback can be constructive, but a red arrow in the absence of identity and, more importantly, in the absenc of a description of just what the disagreement entails, is lame and, again in the absence of engagement, ultimately useless. To use your quote above, "and can appreciate that you give them the opportunity to correct and thus to improve themselves" . . . the anonymous use of red arrows does no such thing.

 

dd

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I have done my best to ignore the arrows and most of the time I succeed. I think they do not work in the way you describe, Wim. People become very upset about the red ones even though I think we all know they can be given accidentally on a tablet. Also, those of us who don't like the red ones make them useless by giving a green one to eliminate them. They just seem to be a negative element in the forum.

 

Paulette

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Wow . . . who'd a thunk it -- that a thread on cute doggos (my pet name for them) could turn toxic red? I do on occasion post comments that may well deserve a full quiver of red arrows, but this one? It's so warm and cuddly. Jill may be right that the culprit was a shaky hand, an accident. But two in one thread? Hmm. 

 

Long ago I asked Alamy to discontinue the anonymous red arrows. They declined. So there it is.  :rolleyes:

 

Thank you so much to those of you who gave me compensating greenies. Turns out I'm now ahead of the game, several greenies up on where I was when I first posted in this thread. Thanks, folks. I give out greenies often, but I've never given a red arrow. I prefer to meet the person out in the parking lot . . . metaphorically speaking.   :ph34r:

 

Edo

Edited by Ed Rooney
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Those negative waves so early in the morning.

;-)

 

Oh boy, it seems I've missed some of the red stuff flying around. Now it's green all around again. Anyway we/I seem to have hijacked a thread, which in my book is also very much against old skool netiquette. My sincere apologies to JIll for this.

 

Still I don't think it warrants the start of a new thread about some red and green pixels. They may however have contributed their little bit to this Forum being more civilized than the old one. I do give quite a bit of green ones at times. And have even given a red one on one or two occasions. As far as I remember as a sort of hey watch your tone sign (it's been a while since I did give a red one).

Personally I think it's not functioning well: I would prefer the reds to remain visual next to the greens, not cancelled out by a subsequent greenie/red one. 

When one gives out a red or green one by mistake, afaik it's impossible to correct that. I would prefer an edit button for it, but I can see that not having one could also be an anti bullying measure.

wim

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Two years ago we adopted a young Sato from Puerto Rico. When he arrived he had a Schnauzer cut and most people we'd meet thought he was a Schnauzer or Schnoodle. Two years later, his hair has grown in and people think he's a Tibetian Terrier or Tibetian Terrier Mix. Others suggest he's a Havanese Personally I think these small fluffy dogs tend to look however the groomer clips them.

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I don't think I've ever knowingly seen a Sato, but I've heard of the problem these street dogs have in the Puerto Rico. On behalf of all dog lovers, I thank you for giving one a home.

 

Thanks Ed,

He was a little feral in the beginning but he's turned into a great pet. We feel blessed to have him. Satos don't look all that different from other mixed breeds. Some look like Shepherd or Lab mixes but there seems to be a large percentage of shaggy little terrier type dogs weighing about 25 pounds or less.

 

fD

 

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My dog is a Lhasa Apso and has ears like the dog on the photo. They are similar to Szitsus and Tibetan Terriers with squashed noses. I would hazard a guess that one of those breeds mixed with something else :)

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