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Tonywiles

Dust spots on Nikon D800E

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I have had a number of QC failures because of dust and blemishes although I spend what seems ages removing them prior to  submission however I must admit to missing some of them which results in the batch failure. I have a Nikon D800E which is just over a year old and dust spots have been a problem almost since day one. It was returned to Nikon HQ to have the sensor cleaned initially they refused to do it-under warranty but subsequently changed their mind. It wasn’t done properly and then had to go back again. The spots are now back again. The camera cost me a small fortune and in fact I’m still paying for it. I cannot understand why such an expensive piece of equipment would have this problem. Just wondering if any other members have had a similar experience and how they managed to resolve it. I have only one lens which is never removed from the camera.Thanks.

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its problem of all dslr

dust could go inside over lens

highly recommended Eyelead SCK-1 works perfect with my D800 and D700        

or remove dust spots with your photo sw

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Like death and taxes, dust on your sensor is inevitable. Even if you never take the lens off, if it's a telescopic zoom you're going to be pumping air in and out of the body every time you operate it.

 

Then, having moving parts, the camera is going to generate its own microscopic particles through wear. Don't obsess about it.

 

Here's how I spot and remove every last dust particle - even ones invisible normally - in the sky or other areas of uniform colour, using Photoshop:

 

1. Duplicate your photo in a second layer (Control J)

2. Select all of the layer you've created (Control A) and erase it

3. Deselect

4. Fill the layer you've created (which is now empty) with pure black using the paint bucket

5. Select 'Overlay'. The sky will now have gone a very dark blue and every last dust spot stands out

6. Make sure you are working in the background layer (the original one) and clone them all out

7. When you've finished, erase the layer filled with black that you created

8. Voilá!

Edited by Alistair Scott
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Like death and taxes, dust on your sensor is inevitable. Even if you never take the lens off, if it's a telescopic zoom you're going to be pumping air in and out of the body every time you operate it.

 

Then, having moving parts, the camera is going to generate its own microscopic particles through wear. Don't obsess about it.

 

Here's how I spot and remove every last dust particle - even ones invisible normally - in the sky or other areas of uniform colour, using Photoshop:

 

1. Duplicate your photo in a second layer (Control J)

2. Select all of the layer you've created (Control A) and erase it

3. Deselect

4. Fill the layer you've created with pure black using the paint bucket

5. Select 'Overlay'. The sky will now have gone a very dark blue and every last dust spot stands out

6. Make sure you are working in the background layer (the original one) and clone them all out

7. When you've finished, erase the layer filled with black that you created

8. Voilá!

 

I use the same overlay layer but it's a lot easier to just (create an action to) make a new fill layer, fill with black and then set to overlay mode.

 

Variations upon http://stockphotostuff.blogspot.co.uk/2010/04/layer-methods-to-aid-dustspot-detection_16.html

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Sure it aren't oil spots instead of dustbunnies?

 

See here and here.

 

Cheers,

Philippe

 

Oil spots are certainly the main issue I have, dust is occasional but oil is for life...or until the mirror box is gummed up.... I guess. 

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Thanks to those who replied it’s reassuring to know that others have the same problems and it seems I will have to live with it. A big thank you to Alistair Scott for letting me have that excellent workflow tip on how to remove dust spots and Geoff Kidd for the additional advice and links That method works really well and finding the spots is now a lot easier. Thanks also to Arterra I did previously google the problem but had no idea that it could be oil spots.

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