Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Via

Images from Quadcopter acceptable on Alamy?

Recommended Posts

Anyone have experience submitting images to Alamy made with the Phantom Vision II quadcopter's 14 Megapixel camera?

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest

Saw the review in pdnonline which pointed to it being about same quality as a GoPro, in which case Alamy don't accept as stills. Would work for some commercial assignment work and comes in around price of a mast set so might be a nice option for that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Don't think it would be possible for high-quality landscapes but I can see no reason why it wouldn't be possible to upload as reportage images depending on the subject.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Just to note - it is illegal in the UK to use a remote control aircraft for commercial work without a Civil Aviation Authority licence (expensive). The work that was discussed in another recent thread was under just such a regime with a properly licenced (and insured) pilot.

Edited by Martin P Wilson

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Saw the review in pdnonline which pointed to it being about same quality as a GoPro, in which case Alamy don't accept as stills. Would work for some commercial assignment work and comes in around price of a mast set so might be a nice option for that.

 

Maybe have a look at this solution, using a RX100 Mk1 or 2

 

wim

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest

 

Saw the review in pdnonline which pointed to it being about same quality as a GoPro, in which case Alamy don't accept as stills. Would work for some commercial assignment work and comes in around price of a mast set so might be a nice option for that.

 

Maybe have a look at this solution, using a RX100 Mk1 or 2

 

wim

 

 

As mentioned in a previous post, you need certification in UK to operate commercially. It's not only about flying it but about the whole safety regime you have implemented, so personally I wouldn't touch any of the cheap 'copters without a return to base automation (amongst other considerations). Not sure that many insurers would be happy with some of what are effectively 'boys toys'.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

 

 

Saw the review in pdnonline which pointed to it being about same quality as a GoPro, in which case Alamy don't accept as stills. Would work for some commercial assignment work and comes in around price of a mast set so might be a nice option for that.

Maybe have a look at this solution, using a RX100 Mk1 or 2

 

wim

 

As mentioned in a previous post, you need certification in UK to operate commercially. It's not only about flying it but about the whole safety regime you have implemented, so personally I wouldn't touch any of the cheap 'copters without a return to base automation (amongst other considerations). Not sure that many insurers would be happy with some of what are effectively 'boys toys'.

 

Which is strange because it's really easy to fly an ultralight in the UK compared to here on the continent. Here in Holland the authorities take a rather practical approach (as long as there are no real rules or laws): lots of people use those DJI Phantoms and Parrots (with their iPhones), so they ban the use at certain occasions. Like when all the heads of state come to The Hague; Obama comes to Amsterdam or when the King is having his birthday in a small village in Holland. (When you see a drone pilot, tell the police!) Only nobody knows about it, so they still have to get them out of the air. Which with a flying time of around 10 minutes isn't all that difficult. The good thing (for the police): when there is a ban, they can fine the pilots. (Fine: Euro 7400 for just having them (not even flying) in the designated area.)

 

I'm afraid it's a lost battle for the authorities. Even in the US the FAA failed to get commercial operator fined so far.

There is lobbying going on from aerial photographers to ban drone photography. And from organizations to keep the use as restricted as possible so they can make money from it.

And yes there have been accidents. More or less like when boys play football (soccer) in the street and from time to time they kick in a window or cause a dent in a car. (In the US it would be girls because there it's a girl's game.)

 

In Holland the authorities look to the UK where it is so much more simple to fly, but they will have their own regulations coming real soon now. One of the rules: you have to take off from an airfield, because its a flying object. Facepalm. I thought the idea was to keep them away from an airfield.

 

The revolution like anything these days will come from Facebook: the bride has seen it on Facebook, so she wants it (-and: here).

(There's an outcry in the US because a Democrat representative hired a photographer to cover his wedding who used a quadcopter. The Democrat is on the House subcommittee that oversees the F.A.A. The outcry is predictably coming from the other Team.)

 

No I don't have one. I envy the boys that have one. I have a 30ft mast. Very cumbersome and not really useful. - Hey wanna buy a 10 meter mast ;-) Now that's an impressive boys' toy ;-)

My 12 ft pole otoh is very fun to use. And it would be really useful if the wifi of the Sony RX100 mk2 wouldn't suck big time. So it remains a sort of toy too. And a great conversation starter. If you're ever longing for somebody to talk to, get one of these and walk around. No sharpshooter on the roof that wants to take one out either. I bet they will start waving in stead.

 

With those microcopters it will go like with the PC or the smartphone. Remember IBM? There will be a market for 5 computers.

 

So, Geoff, no offense, but I disagree.

 

wim

 

(sorry for the Dutch in some links)

 

edit: typo

Edited by wiskerke

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest

Wim,

 

I don't disagree that the small copters will be bought and used. There are two things, the regulations in the UK for commercial flying are fairly strict and the knock-on effect is that insurance will also be strict on how operators not only use their craft but how good the craft are. Insurers like to not have to pay out and will look to ways to weasel out....same reason I have hard-wired smoke detectors as a landlord and not battery ones, no regulations but insurance cover.

 

Also, the real money at the moment in drones seems to be in areas that need high-tech machines and all the relevant cover - try working for many organisations in UK without full certification and you'll see the door damn quick.

 

We have the same debates over insurance, either for equipment or PL....that didn't work out well for one forum member in the past.....

 

And yes, I would like to buy a 10m mast. I have three jobs next week where the property developer (secondary client) would like to replace a high level archiviz with some photos.....anyone got a copter for hire ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It is certainly worth knowing the law with regard to quadcopters. This guy got prosecuted in the UK http://www.theguardian.com/world/2014/apr/02/uk-first-drone-conviction

 

I did look into getting one for a short video I was commissioned to do, but the cost/hassle soon put that way beyond the budget. 

 

David

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Use a large kite.

 

Allan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Use a large kite.

 

Allan

Need to ask him very nicely though.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Use a large kite.

 

Allan

 

Or.... find a tall object and base jump.... just don't get your camera/chute releases mixed up  :D

Edited by Duncan_Andison

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Use a large kite.

 

Allan

I did give it some thought as I know a guy who has one.  The shot was to involve flying downstream over a waterfall and into space (as well as vertically up a cliff face among other ideas) but a lack of time, finite control and watching a couple of grands worth of video camera creaming into the river/ground put me off :-)   

 

Duncan - this method works very well https://vimeo.com/91568044

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Use a large kite.

 

Allan

Need to ask him very nicely though.

 

 

Now there's a thought. A new twist on animal photography. Oh! No, it has already been done.

 

Who owns this copyright? Public, Monkey or Man?

 

Allan

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Wim,

 

I take it you saw this:

http://nos.nl/video/683868-nederlandse-droneindustrie-een-onwerkbare-situatie.html

groetjes,

 

Richard

 

Yes everybody is talking about the same things at the same time. Must be the silly season. Komkommertijd; Agurketid; Gherkin Season.

In the news item all the professionals complain about the new permits (actually exemptions) and certificates that they need since Dutch officialdom suddenly last year has discovered those toys were being used by photographers and film makers.

 

For the public it's like before: it's a model airplane. People have been flying toy airplanes since the Wright brothers.

 

lartigue-zissou+in+his+ZYK+24,+1910.jpg

1910 Zissou in his ZYX 24  by Lartigue

 

But wait now there are people making money with those toys. We cannot have that. We have to regulate that. Suppose everybody was doing that, sir.

- But uhh everybody is doing it.

Yes and we want our cut!

 

I'm afraid they have found the ultimate solution: they are going to ask Brussels to put an end to it regulate it.

 

wim

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.