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When I've tried out the Camera Shake function in Photoshop, it looks to me like it oversharpens the image.  I've seen halos around parts of the image.

I really don't know how to use this function as far as what the sliders do. I just tried it at the native settings. Should one not use this for Alamy contributions?  Or....is this function "not sharpening" and OK?

 

Betty

Edited by Betty LaRue
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Sounds like a good way to flirt with cell A750 in the Sin Bin.

 

I don't know this tool, Betty. Is it in CS6? I do some post in CS5 but mostly I use LR5 these days . . . and I always tick Remove Chromatic Aberration, which should get rid of those halos. But do you really want to spend time and effort going to extraordinary ways of fixing tech mistakes? Maybe it would be better to reshot, if possible? Or just move on.  

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I haven't tried this tool either. I took some night shots of the CN tower on Saturday night as it was all rainbow colours because of World Pride week in Toronto. Then on Monday and Tuesday nights for Canada Day as it was all red and white. I didn't have my tripod and the images are shaky. Where can I find the tool and I"ll try it out and see?

 

Jill

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I've decided to take a tripod along from here on when I'm planning to capture landmark images, especially at tricky, night and low-light times. When I was using my Nikon D700 and D90 I found it easy to shoot handheld with steadiness and no noise at high ISOs. This is simply not the case with either the Sony RX10 or my NEX cameras. Yes, it's time to face some hard facts. 

 

I own a Slik carbon-fiber tripod witch is almost weightless (or is that term reserved for outer space?) when I carry it in a shoulder case. I also have that great Leica table pod. I don't want to be playing doctor to inferior images. 

 

Edo

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I haven't tried this tool either. I took some night shots of the CN tower on Saturday night as it was all rainbow colours because of World Pride week in Toronto. Then on Monday and Tuesday nights for Canada Day as it was all red and white. I didn't have my tripod and the images are shaky. Where can I find the tool and I"ll try it out and see?

 

Jill

 

It is in CS6, the CC.  Look under "sharpen" and it is first in the list.

 

 I wasn't looking at this for Alamy images, but some shots I took for private use.  I found I could use it to increase sharpness of the eyes, but this is how I did it.  I duplicated the layer, then used it at native settings which are too strong, then used the brush to remove all of it.  Then at 50% or lower, using the brush on white, selectively used it on the eyes and a bit of hair on portraits.  It made a great difference.

 

But it did make me curious about QC, and if one had a really good shot but with a tiny bit of camera shake, if it could be used.  Actually it is called "Shake Reduction".

Edited by Betty LaRue
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Betty,

 

It's in CC (not CS6) and IMO not worth much. I certainly wouldn't use it for stock or client work - maybe for Facebook.

 

Edo, my CF legs are Sli©k also....great, much under-valued tripods legs IMO.

Edited by Guest
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Right, Geoff. The Slik line of carbon fibers run $300 to $1,000 now (I paid $300 for mine some time ago) but the Gitzo CFs are out of sight . . . and any tripod can break down. I have a broken Gitzo.  :)

Edited by Ed Rooney
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I think I will always take the tripod with me as well from now on. I was doing a vendor booth at Harbourfront for all my custom dog collars, so didn't want to take anything I didn't have to. But missed a number of good shots on the Saturday night for the Pride party with Rainblow lit hula hoops. Got some okay shots by hand, but nothing I could put up in stock or news.  A lesson learned.

 

I don't have CC, so any of those extras I don't have access to. Am thinking about it though.

 

Jill

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To be realistic, Jill, it is next to impossible to use a tripod when shooting a parade or a party . . . unless you have a vantage point in a window looking down at the event. An even then, being on a tripod does not stop action . . . people will move and blur.  

 

A third of my sales are of landmarks, clichés.  Yes, of course I'm competing with a huge amount of material now days . . . but I've found it worthwhile to be in the mix. Instead of looking for offbeat views and offbeat subjects I wait for perfect lighting and try to get as close as I can to the perfect cliché image.  I feel so many people have gotten so far away from this that it is worth doing. 

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A third of my sales are of landmarks, clichés.  Yes, of course I'm competing with a huge amount of material now days . . . but I've found it worthwhile to be in the mix.

 

It's very likely that a lot of customers searching for landmark subjects will use the New tab first and only broaden the range if they don't find what they want. So I think your approach is spot on Ed.

 

Alan

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To be realistic, Jill, it is next to impossible to use a tripod when shooting a parade or a party . . . unless you have a vantage point in a window looking down at the event. An even then, being on a tripod does not stop action . . . people will move and blur.  

 

A third of my sales are of landmarks, clichés.  Yes, of course I'm competing with a huge amount of material now days . . . but I've found it worthwhile to be in the mix. Instead of looking for offbeat views and offbeat subjects I wait for perfect lighting and try to get as close as I can to the perfect cliché image.  I feel so many people have gotten so far away from this that it is worth doing.

 

Good stuff there, Ed.  I like that broken bicycle shot.  By the way, E17GW1 you're caption says "message parlor" instead of "massage".  Now, as an old (not literally) copy editor will you check mine?  :)  Sometimes I can't see the obvious in my own.

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Good catch, Betty--thanks. It's true I was a magazine copy editor . . . but it's equally true that I am dyslectic, was tested as a child.  I just noticed and fixed another spelling error in a post above: brake for break.  Well, my punctuation is good.  :wacko:

 

There are broken bikes tied up all over the city. I wonder what that's about? 

Edited by Ed Rooney
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Ed,

 

We have quite a lot of wrecked bikes in the North of England too.

 

While looking for the bike I noticed your brick wall pictures too.  This is dramatic cutting edge photography!

 

I have a few brick wall images showing different states of decay and also the different bonds (patterns of laying).  I am aiming to get as   many different bonds as I can.     Yours is "English Bond" - alternate courses of stretchers and headers with the stretchers aligned with those in the course above.  Might be worth adding in the keywords.

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There are broken bikes tied up all over the city. I wonder what that's about? 

 

We have the same thing happening in Cambridge, UK at times. I have not fathomed it myself but suspect something to do with students and end of term/finals.

 

Allan

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Thanks for the brick laying lesson, Peter. Who woulda thunk it? I'll add that to my keywords. My wall surrounds the Old St. Patrick's Cathedral, now a basilica. It is old by New York standards. There is a Federal Style building across the street from me that was built in 1808. That is very old by New York standards. Over the years I've taken a lot of pictures with that wall in the background, then one day decided to snap the wall itself. I don't expect it to sell, but there it is.

 

 DY4HYH.jpg

 

This is another shot of bricks, but these are in a road in Soho. I used it in one of my blogs, talking about the failure of our local government to take care of things. 

 

Allan, some of these bikes in NYC are left as a memorial to someone who was killed when riding in our streets. Our last mayor wanted NYC to become an Amsterdam or Copenhagen. Too many cars and trucks, I think.  It is an odd way to get rid of a bike, just leave it tied to a bike rack. 

Edited by Ed Rooney
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Allan, some of these bikes in NYC are left as a memorial to someone who was killed when riding in our streets. Our last mayor wanted NYC to become an Amsterdam or Copenhagen. Too many cars and trucks, I think.  It is an odd way to get rid of a bike, just leave it tied to a bike rack. 

 

In this case they're painted white and usually called Ghost Bikes.

Bad roads are a serious hazard to cyclists. Even in Amsterdam. Where of course cyclists can be a hazard to anybody and anything else ;-)

People sometimes complain about activist this or that (usually judges); wait till you meet a whole city of activist cyclists!

 

Ed, I would maybe add streets and roads as keywords. Searches this year that came close to your subject were: USA roads disrepair and USA bridges disrepair.

 

wim

 

(who long ago  was the bicycle activist photographer of Holland.)

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Thanks a lot, Wim.

 

Actually I know a bit more about the bike culture of Amsterdam than I know about peddling around New York.  I did not know about the term Ghost Bikes here.  I do have a few snaps of those. Guess I have some keywording to do. The bicycles in Amsterdam control the city.  Strangers sightseeing in the city are in danger of being hit; the bike riders go very fast and the bike paths sometimes go up on the sidewalk.  Yikes! And most tourists are not looking down. I was in a taxi once where the driver was on a rant about the bicycles. I think bikes are a good idea that has perhaps gotten out of hand.

 

Here's one of my Ghost Bikes. I updated the keywording, which will change tomorrow.  I'm of mixed thinking as regard to putting in the street names on these shots . . . and at this point I have no idea where I shot these pics. I used to ID food pics with the restaurant I took them, but I decided that information would work against me unless the dish was a signature dish in a famous eatery. I mean who would be looking for a bike picture specifically taken at Avenue A? 

 

B229YR.jpg

Edited by Ed Rooney
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If you would like a bit more pedantic brickie terms:

 

If bricks are used for paving they are, or can be, known as paviors or, in UK spelling paviours.

 

If they are made by cutting them from rock (as yours look as though they might be) they can also be known as setts (pl), although that term is usually restricted to paving blocks cut from granite.

 

If stones are used in their natural form they are cobblestones.   We have a historic town locally where there has been much protest that ancient cobblestones are being replaced by granite setts.   My E29D41 shows this "vandalism" in action.   I would like to drag the image in here, but I have forgotten how....

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Thanks again, Peter. 

 

FYI: you find the image with a search on the Alamy home page. Click on it to get the largest image, then drag and drop the image into an open Edit window here. 

 

In my blog I mention seeing workers lay new paving blocks in Paris sometime after the riots in the spring of 1968, which I covered. The road repair was much later in the year.  B)

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Here in Vancouver, it's common to see skeleton bikes -- i.e. the sad, rusting remains of cannibalized bicycles still locked to bike racks and trees. I've never thought of photographing them, though. With the ever increasing numbers of bikes on the road, there is now a constant war between car drivers and cyclists who refuse to obey the traffic laws. I got rid of my old bike last year and, as much as I enjoy cycling, I don't think I'll get a new one. Ironically, eco-friendly bike riding has become much too dangerous. 

 

BTW, Peter, what is the official name the type of paving shown on the right side of this image?

 

D2A3H9.jpg

Edited by John Mitchell
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From camera shake cure to ghost bikes to styles of paving and bricks....can't wait to see where it goes next :) !!

As to the original op question, have tried all combinations of settings for the shake reduction in Photoshop cc and it does work....but the artifacts and sharpening effects make it a no no for QC at 100%.

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From camera shake cure to ghost bikes to styles of paving and bricks....can't wait to see where it goes next :) !!

As to the original op question, have tried all combinations of settings for the shake reduction in Photoshop cc and it does work....but the artifacts and sharpening effects make it a no no for QC at 100%.

 

Next possible subtopic: image-stabilized, bike-mounted tripods for shooting while ghost-biking on cobblestone streets. B)

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Some people get bent out of shape when they start a thread and it quickly goes off-topic.  I don't.  I welcome it. I do want the first few posters to address the thread topic, but once that's done I think some of the most interesting posts happen!  Like this tangent of bicycles and paving stones.  Love it. :)

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Ed:

 

Thanks for that I will ry it next time.

 

Betty:

 

Sorry I did not mean to sabotage your thread!     I know it is about bikes not bricks.

 

We have the Tour de France cycle race starting here in Yorkshire tomorrow.   We have old bikes chained up all over the place sprayed bright yellow.  I have made some pictures but they will not be through QC until next week.

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