Jump to content

Recommended Posts

There has been a new neighborhood going up behind our back fence for the past 2 years, where once was a 20 acre field.  I have gone over from time to time and got some construction shots.  One licensed the other day for $150!

 

So I go over the other day and get some shots with my X-T1 for the first time.  One of them showed moire in the pattern of the shingles on the roof.

 

Yesterday, I went downtown and shot some buildings.  I got moire again in a couple of images.  I've never had to worry about this with my Nikons, and bought the D800 instead of the D800E for just that reason. 

 

I tried removing it in LR, but made a mess of it.  Could be my inexperience since I've never had to do it before.  I used the moire slider, then the adjustment brush. It looked worse when I was done than when I started.

 

Anyone who has experience with this please let me know the workflow, otherwise I will have to shoot Nikon for these types of images and I really, really would rather use the lightweight X-T1.

 

All help appreciated and I might kiss your feet to boot.

 

Betty

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Some buildings I've photographed with every camera  and every lens combination I've every owned and still will get moire in the same spots of the building.Hey,well at least it's consistent! :-)

 

Lot's of tutorials online,I just googled and saw all flavors of them.

 

Here is one:

 

http://photographylife.com/how-to-remove-moire-in-photoshop

 

I usually try and fix in Lightrrom but sometimes can't remove from certain spots and  just desaturate it.

 

L

Edited by Linda

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've occasionally had some moiré show up on buildings (shiny surfaces) in by NEX-6 images. Perhaps mirrorless cameras are more prone to this. Don't know.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Or mirrorless without an AA filter? I have had this on Nikon and Canon DSLRs.Full frame and APS-C.

 

L

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The facade of the New Museum on the Bowery, with its endless patterns, is a moirelistic nightmare. (Oh, look -- I made up a word!) Anyway, Betty, here's a little bag of tricks . . . and hopefully one or two will work:  http://photographylife.com/how-to-avoid-moire

 

Another point -- is the subject you're shooting worth a whole lot of extra time and trouble?  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I've occasionally had some moiré show up on buildings (shiny surfaces) in by NEX-6 images. Perhaps mirrorless cameras are more prone to this. Don't know.

 

The problem is usually in the subject, John. Open the link I posted above to Betty. Are there moireless cameras? Don't know. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I posted this in the Fuji X forum, and there seemed to be a consensus that what I got wasn't true moire, but caused by the resolution of the monitor interacting with the pattern in the image.  The reason being, in one of my images, I could see the moire at 16.6% size of the image on my monitor, but when I enlarged past this, it disappeared.  The other image, it appeared at 33.3% size on the monitor, then disappeared upon enlarging past that.

 

Of course, there was a lot of techno-speak which I thoroughly didn't understand! :)

Ed, that link is useful.  Next time I shoot something like that, I will take several shots changing zooms and angles and see what happens.

 

Linda, I Googled some of those too, and ended up making a mess of the image.  I guess I need to practice, since I've never tried to correct moire before.

 

What I don't know is how QC will look at these two or three images.  It doesn't show at 100%.  But does QC start small and work their way up?  They use different monitors than mine, so will it even appear to them at all?  I would expect experienced QC workers will know what is true moire and what isn't.

 

I guess the answer would be to upload these images by themselves, after I upload and hopefully achieve acceptance of the others.  Then hold my breath and see what happens. If they pass, then it will pretty much prove what I was told on the Fuji forum and I can forget about it.  What I saw was a wavy pattern of supposed moire but not color moire.

 

I'd hate to spend 30 days in the sin bin but I feel it is useful for me to find out about this one way or the other.

 

Otherwise, I'm in love with Fuji, especially the lenses.

 

Betty

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

 

I've occasionally had some moiré show up on buildings (shiny surfaces) in by NEX-6 images. Perhaps mirrorless cameras are more prone to this. Don't know.

 

The problem is usually in the subject, John. Open the link I posted above to Betty. Are there moireless cameras? Don't know. 

 

Thanks, Ed. Looks like a useful link. I don't bother trying to fix moiré. In fact, I do a minimum of post-processing these days, shooting mainly in JPEG and trying to get everything right before pushing the shutter. If an image has moiré or some other flaw that would take ages to fix, I just don't submit it. I believe that Alamy doesn't mention moiré in their submission guidelines, but to me it ain't worth languishing in the bin for 30 days in order to find out if it's acceptable.

Edited by John Mitchell

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Trying to fix moiré in PP is as frustrating as trying to solve the problem of a slightly noisy blue sky. Since a blue sky indicates a bright day, a lower ISO is the way to go. John, I tried shooting jpegs, trying to move my workflow a bit faster, put up more images, but I feel I need to spot every picture at 100%, so I end up not really saving much time. I'll be staying with RAW>tiff>jpeg for now. 

 

The most useful part of that link is the ways to avoid moiré while shooting. I'm sure Betty will be able to make use of those things in the future. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Trying to fix moiré in PP is as frustrating as trying to solve the problem of a slightly noisy blue sky. Since a blue sky indicates a bright day, a lower ISO is the way to go. John, I tried shooting jpegs, trying to move my workflow a bit faster, put up more images, but I feel I need to spot every picture at 100%, so I end up not really saving much time. I'll be staying with RAW>tiff>jpeg for now. 

 

The most useful part of that link is the ways to avoid moiré while shooting. I'm sure Betty will be able to make use of those things in the future. 

Changing the shooting angle / subject distance sounds like good advice. However, I've seen moiré in out-of-focus background areas in a couple of my images, so I'm not sure how well refocusing on other areas works. I guess it depends on the subject. At any rate, it always pays to experiment. Digital has made that easy to do.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have never really had a problem with moiré, in fact never really noticed it even with the X-T1.

 

My workflow is RAW -> jpeg (or whatever else I need). I do the minimum of PP. These days I do everything in Capture 1 Pro (have tinkered with LR on same basis), keep all my images as RAW+C1 sidecar with non-destructive edits. JPGs or TIFs of appropriate size (web sized or full size HQ for submission usually) are created as and when I need them. Can't remember when I last used PS ( >year) except for creating something from scratch or overlaying text. I used to go via TIF but haven't felt the need for several years.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.