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Phil Robinson

Daily Mail online offering our images for easy copying.

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I have just seen one of my images used by the Mail Online. 

 

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2637725/Catholic-family-branded-bigoted-social-workers-not-wanting-children-adopted-gay-couple.html

 

At the bottom right of the image - and all the other images - is a little camera symbol. Click on this and it gives you the opportunity to 'share' the image on Facebook, Twitter, Pinterest and Google.

Should we - and Alamy - be encouraging this kind of free re-distribution of our images?

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People share news stories all the time, that's why it's news. It just provides a link back to the original article.

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Guest

Digital sharing of articles is included in some rights by Alamy - example from magazine rights "Editorial print and digital use including Facebook and Twitter in association with the original article".

 

All those HuffPos from past could/were digitally shared with the article.

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All I get when I click the camera is a link to the gallery.

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All I get when I click the camera is a link to the gallery.

 

If you just move the cursor over it without clicking, you get the options.

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All I get when I click the camera is a link to the gallery.

 

If you just move the cursor over it without clicking, you get the options.

 

 

If you click the FB link option, you get the article small image/header on your FB wall, click that and it's a link back to the article.

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I'm obviously protected from that by my pop-up blocker or something.

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I notice a lot of sights have this.

I find a lot of infringements that are using 'shared' photos on commercial sites.

I just collected $1500 a piece from 2 infringers this week for the same type of issue....so,that's why I'm not going to get all that pissed off about it. :-)

Secondly,there is nothing we can do about theft.If the 'share' button was not there,those that want to steal an image will just drag it onto their desktop anyway.

 

But I think the 'share' button sends the wrong message and it's like putting ZERO value on our images when they are on a site being offered for free or encouaging people to 'share.'.

 

L

Edited by Linda
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Sharing is the way of the Web, and it's here to stay. Unfortunately, "sharing" often amounts to "stealing" for photographers. I'm not sure that there is a heck of a lot we can do about it. Unless, like Linda, you're into releasing the hounds.

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Like Linda, I pursue infringers and the first thing I check when I find one of my images unlicensed on a company's website, I see if they have a Facebook page and if the image is also appearing on their FB page, they get a "double whammy" letter of demand!  One particular image (which is USCO registered) was shared on several other commercial Facebook sites (all without obtaining a license) and they ALL received letters of demand and I was successful in settling about 50% of them.  

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The sharing options just generate a headline about the story, a thumbnail and a link - it's sharing not infringing.

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Like Linda, I pursue infringers and the first thing I check when I find one of my images unlicensed on a company's website, I see if they have a Facebook page and if the image is also appearing on their FB page, they get a "double whammy" letter of demand!  One particular image (which is USCO registered) was shared on several other commercial Facebook sites (all without obtaining a license) and they ALL received letters of demand and I was successful in settling about 50% of them.  

I admire your tenacity. I used to chase infringers but found it too time-consuming and somewhat debilitating (I felt a bit like an ambulance-chasing lawyer). Guess I need to hire a cyber-detective of some sort.

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