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FujiFilm X-T1 = soft or lacking definition

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Guest dlmphotog

Has anyone using the FujiFilm X-T1 gotten the dreaded soft or lacking definition rejection?

 

I did the Milford Track in March and have been submitting images from that trip and on my third batch I got the SOLD rejection of a landscape image. I process my RAW using ACR and the finished images do have a bit of the “watercolor” effect in the foliage and rocks. I carefully reviewed all the images and deleted two from the batch have now resubmitted them.

 

My question for those using the FujiFilm X-T1 camera…

Any rejections?

What RAW converter do you use?

Any sharpening? If so what settings?

 

Thanks,

 

David L. Moore

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I am waiting on QC of my first batch of X-T1 images that I uploaded just before Easter. I went through them at 100% and can't say I saw any watercolour effect from my conversions using Capture 1 Pro. However they weren't landscapes so foliage was not a major feature. I had no QC problems with my X-E1.

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I would be very curious to see a crop of the failed image(s) if you are willing to post.

 

I do not have an X-T1, but have many images uploaded from X-Pro1 both at alamy and some more demanding libraries as well... Soft or lacking definition is definitely NOT how I would describe the images I get from my X-Pro1.

 

No QC fails here, though now and again I do come across some images that display the watercolor effect but nothing that I would feel would risk QC fail. I find that in most cases over-sharpening is generally the culprit for this. Those Fuji lenses are damn sharp as is (assuming proper technique!), so easy does it on when sharpening RAW files- especially for foliage as you mentioned. I process in LR5 and sharpening is usually less than 20, less than 1px radius, and some masking as appropriate.

 

For foliage, try to lower sharpening, lower the sharpening radius, and increase detail setting. This usually works. Also correct exposure and adequate shutter speeds (or tripod!) are important.

 

Hope that helps.

 

-Jason

Edited by Reciprocity Images

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What is the 'Milford Track'?

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Has anyone using the FujiFilm X-T1 gotten the dreaded soft or lacking definition rejection?

 

I did the Milford Track in March and have been submitting images from that trip and on my third batch I got the SOLD rejection of a landscape image. I process my RAW using ACR and the finished images do have a bit of the “watercolor” effect in the foliage and rocks. I carefully reviewed all the images and deleted two from the batch have now resubmitted them.

 

My question for those using the FujiFilm X-T1 camera…

Any rejections?

What RAW converter do you use?

Any sharpening? If so what settings?

 

Thanks,

 

David L. Moore

 

Non, just uploaded 350 or so. Still need to keyword them though  :(

 

I use Capture One Pro 7, I apply little to gentle sharpening. Stick it to a small radius about 0.3 and reduce noise reduction. To be honest, The file quality is the same as the X-Pro1 and I have uploaded well over a 2000 without any rejections.

 

Edit. You have to be careful with LR or ACR. They have improved the way they handle X-Trans files a lot but they are still someway off Capture One and Iridient Developer. Capture One is better for large volume processing compared to Iridient.

Edited by Duncan_Andison

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Guest dlmphotog

100_crop.jpg

 

Here is a %100 crop

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100_crop.jpg

 

Here is a %100 crop

 

I would say there are a couple of things going on there. You are seeing some "Watercolour effect" but also, the image is a little soft. That combination is likely to end up with a rejection. As john mentioned above, slight camera shake possibly?!? What lens was used at what settings?

 

With Capture One your rarely see the Watercolour Effect and when it does, is fairly easy to control. As has been mentioned, the Fuji lenses are normally very sharp before processing so if a shot is bang on, very little sharpening is required. Keep to the smallest radius but most importantly, keep all Noise Reduction right down. The combination of NR and over sharpening seems to be the main cause of this problem. I'm not sure how fine the controls are in LR these days but I know in C1 you can zero NR and apply sharpening at a radius of 0.2 if needed.

 

That said, it looks like there was a small amount of movement when the shot was taken, not much though. There are a couple of default Soft Focus settings in C1 that would have probably corrected that. Those using LR maybe able to provide settings specific to that app as well.

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I would probably have to agree with Duncan above: Slight camera shake combined with over-sharpening. Not a good combo. That's only a guess though and of course it's impossible to know without knowing your camera settings, technique and shooting conditions.

 

-Jason

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It is several years since I had a QC fail but even so, last year I looked at my workflow and realised I could up my game even further. I now take a zero tolerance approach to sharpness, if it is not bitingly sharp where it should be it does not get submitted. I no longer try and rescue very slightly off images. All the equipment I use, pro Canon and Fuji X, can out perform my technique so it is up to me to improve my work to get the most out of them. Still a lot to do on the non-technical aspects as well :( to make it more saleable.

 

My aim is to have stricter personal standards than Alamy QC which after all are pretty basic for professionals and serious enthusiasts.

 

I just got three small batches of X-T1 images through QC.

Edited by Martin P Wilson
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Guest dlmphotog

OK now I’m in a PANIC!!!

 

After looking at each image at 100% and deleting a few I was rejected again!!! I do not want to end up in the QC doghouse.

 

The setting for the first image that was rejected was f9 at 180th 400iso. I do see some camera shake so I won't begrudge QC for calling me out on it.

 

My main worry is that X-T1 watercolor effect is the source for the rejection so I reprocess an image using Capture-1 and it is VERY similar to the ACR output. So I don’t see the point of learning a new workflow for very little improvement.

 

I will get my nose back to the grindstone by editing ruthlessly and by submitting small batches hopefully I will get back in the good graces with QC.

 

David L. Moore

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I would suggest that you check if you can turn off the in-camera noise reduction ("The X-Trans sensor also works to provide highly effective noise reduction and a clean signal-to-noise ratio"). Looking at the rocks on the crop you posted, they look like if they were over-processed. You may want to test and see if you get different results (more 'punchy') with the in-camera noise reduction off.

 

L.

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OK now I’m in a PANIC!!!

 

After looking at each image at 100% and deleting a few I was rejected again!!! I do not want to end up in the QC doghouse.

 

The setting for the first image that was rejected was f9 at 180th 400iso. I do see some camera shake so I won't begrudge QC for calling me out on it.

 

My main worry is that X-T1 watercolor effect is the source for the rejection so I reprocess an image using Capture-1 and it is VERY similar to the ACR output. So I don’t see the point of learning a new workflow for very little improvement.

 

I will get my nose back to the grindstone by editing ruthlessly and by submitting small batches hopefully I will get back in the good graces with QC.

 

David L. Moore

Take it from me, the QC doghouse is not a place you want to be. Woof! Woof!

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OK now I’m in a PANIC!!!

 

After looking at each image at 100% and deleting a few I was rejected again!!! I do not want to end up in the QC doghouse.

 

The setting for the first image that was rejected was f9 at 180th 400iso. I do see some camera shake so I won't begrudge QC for calling me out on it.

 

My main worry is that X-T1 watercolor effect is the source for the rejection so I reprocess an image using Capture-1 and it is VERY similar to the ACR output. So I don’t see the point of learning a new workflow for very little improvement.

 

I will get my nose back to the grindstone by editing ruthlessly and by submitting small batches hopefully I will get back in the good graces with QC.

 

David L. Moore

 

Seriously, spend a bit of time on the C1 sharpening and Noise control tools, they are completely different compared to LR, so much so, I bought into the pro version straight off. You'll see a lot of people confirming this across the different Fuji forums. The problem is, there are quite a few bells and whistles that can lead to a bit of a learning curve. They have good tutorial videos and webinars to cover that though.

 

Most important thing is not to panic, new camera new ways. If something isn't quite right with this batch, avoid re-sending it until you know for sure what it is.

 

Just out of curiosity, what camera did you have before? If you are had a larger DSLR and moving to a light weight mirrorless camera it could be the camera shake that is the main issue which in turn will make it very hard to get the best out of any image. Mirrorless cameras will not take as much movement as a DSLR and can punish you. I went through that process with the Nex7, takes a little time to adjust.

 

By the way, what focal length was it at f/9 180th 400iso? With mirrorless, I try to stick well above the old 50mm = 1/50th. With the X-T1 you can shoot high ISO comfortably so don't be shy with the speed dial to really nail the shot. I've submitted clean 2000 plus ISO shots that were handheld at sunset. I would start off by eliminating problems with the camera by taking a series of shots in optimum conditions, good form off and on the camera. If you have more than one lens, try them all. Lets make sure it isn't a technical problem with the camera or lenses.

 

After this, shoot something completely different making sure everything is spot on and then submit the new batch. 

 

Hope this helps a little...

 

Below are two examples of, one high iso 2000+ and another is one that had the watercolour effect originally. It's really a case of getting rid of any excess NR control and reduce the sharpening as the lenses (primes) are extremely sharp as it is.

 

High  ISO. This was one of my pre-shoot shots, scouting for positions handheld high ISO. The sun disappeared and this + a few other pre shots rescued the night :-)

D8M253.jpg

 

 

Watercolour effect eliminated, now in the creative search so I can only assume this was looked at closely. That 60mm is razor sharp and can really bring on the Watercolour effect, with camera shack it would be impossible to remove, no fine detail to recover it.

D8M3CA.jpg

 

Edit. Here are two 100% crops of the above. (middle right edge)

WE100per1.jpg

 

WE100per2.jpg

Edited by Duncan_Andison
  • Upvote 1

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That's excellent advice from Duncan. Even with image stabilisation for general shooting I aim to shoot at 1/(focal length * 1,5) to take account of the extra magnification used with the smaller sensor; so with 50mm it would be 1/75 (so round up to 1/125 - my default walk around setting with the 18-55mm). And remember squeeze the shutter, even with a "grab" shot - believe it or not I consciously take my  time over pressing the shutter even with sport and a pro DSLR (it might be milliseconds but it pays to take the time for half pressure to focus and then a final squeeze for exposure - less shake & better focus). Sorry if I am teaching your grandmother to suck eggs!

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100_crop.jpg

 

Here is a %100 crop

Importing your screenshot into PS and viewing at 100% shows "watercolor" effect. Looks like a combination of too much noise reduction followed by some edge sharpening.

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I tend to get camera shake with these smaller cameras if I'm not very careful so I rarely shoot at less than 250th and nearly always use shutter priority rather than aperture priority so I don't lose control of this inadvertently.  So far I have not had a QC failure with any of the  Fuji X series but a higher proportion get rejected at the editing stage than on my Canon 5Diii.

 

Pearl

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I find that with the small Sony NEX cameras, the lens-based image stabilization (IS) is very effective at shorter focal lengths, and I can shoot at surprisingly slow shutter speeds. However, it's a different story with longer lenses. I have to be very careful when using my 55-210 lens. It can be very susceptible to camera shake at the long end (150+ mm), and IS doesn't seem to help that much. Consequently, I usually boost the ISO and choose the fastest shutter speeds possible at long focal lengths. Heavier camera bodies definitely have an advantage when it comes to controlling shake with long lenses. 

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Maybe something to be said for adding the battery grip to the X-T1 as it will add a little more weight. Not enough but it all helps.

 

Allan

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Guest dlmphotog

Thank you Duncan, and everyone else for the great advice.

 

My mirrorless journey began with the Lumix LX-3 and then a Fujifilm X-100, X-E1 and now the X-T1. I was hiking so I was probably more shaky than normal.

 

I was rejected again!! Now for “Chromatic Aberration” could they mean watercolor effect? I reviewed every image I sent in the latest batch and could not find any classic “Chromatic Aberration” (color shift on edges).

 

The original image that was rejected was/is “Soft or Lack Definition” and I admit that as a failure on my part. So I have culled all the SOL images from my edit.

 

I may have over sharpen in my last batch to avoid SOL but now I in a convoluted place where no sharpening gets me SOL rejections? and some sharpening gets me “Chromatic Aberration” rejections?

 

I’m going to take a break and work on some commercial projects.

 

David L. Moore

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Maybe something to be said for adding the battery grip to the X-T1 as it will add a little more weight. Not enough but it all helps.

 

Allan

 

True.... I only take off the grip when I really need to save the weight!

 

Regarding CA, I don't believe they would mix up watercolour effect with CA, too different.

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