Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Marmot

Can similar images have different licence types

Recommended Posts

Probably a daft question, but can 2 images created from the same RAW file origin but given different post processing be licenced differently, i.e. one RM and one RF?  I've "redone" some of my images, some which have already been sold, so I don't want to delete the old versions off Alamy, but I may want to post the new versions as a different licence type.  I know it is technically possible to select a different licence, but is it ethical? :unsure:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not sure from a 'legal' point of view, but as the people who license the images might do their own Photoshopping, they could potentially end up with something very like your new version, so I would avoid it. 

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Phil.  That is a fair point! :wacko:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

My understanding is, but maybe im wrong? if one Is RM and then the same one (edited or not) is RF, you could only have one either RF or RM of the same image for sale.

However, if you update them and give them the same license as with the "older version " e.g. Photo x is RM same photo x but updated now also RM. I think it might be fine.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you PatrioticAlien (cool name!).  I think I'll just leave the licences the same for both. :)

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest

Probably a daft question, but can 2 images created from the same RAW file origin but given different post processing be licenced differently, i.e. one RM and one RF?  I've "redone" some of my images, some which have already been sold, so I don't want to delete the old versions off Alamy, but I may want to post the new versions as a different licence type.  I know it is technically possible to select a different licence, but is it ethical? :unsure:

 

In theory yes, you can write an EULA to require anything - RF can be as limited as you want (obvious example are the micro RF licenses which limit useage). RM can be sold as almost RF-like. Alamy sell RM with incredibly broad uses - the only thing making them 'RM' is they tell you they are very broad in useage.

 

There is one significant point when it comes to RM licensing which is exclusive, you would have to disclose the alternative same/similars.

 

However, in the real world....what's the point? if the content remains the same, the processing will make only minor changes unless it's very radical. If it was good enough to be RM to start with, the new ones would merit the same license. If the original was RF, same issue....what's changed so much that merits a change in license. If you made a mistake for the first license....change it!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I thought once an image has sold under one licence, e.g. RF, then that licence couldn't be changed to RM.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Guest

I thought once an image has sold under one licence, e.g. RF, then that licence couldn't be changed to RM.

 

Not the case, I have had Getty change the license type on previously sold images - generally you only go RM > RF. What you can't do is impinge on current licenses by any change. Obviously previously sold RF being offered as RM is slighlty pointless, as the whole notion of RM is having image rights managed and available for a prospective buyer - especially exclusive rights.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.