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I bought a Windows 7 Gateway computer for about $400 last fall and it's been working fine.  I transferred the images I cared about most from my XP computer before the Microsoft cutoff as well as  I could.  Then I just disconnected the ethernet cable on the XP so at least it can't be hacked.  The only thing I thought I would miss is being able to run my Minolta film scanners (5400 and Multipro) but I read of a trick where you download Vuescan for them first and then the Minolta software (which is out on some European site somewhere) will work.  It worked with my 5400; haven't tried the Multi Pro yet.  Other than that I don't have issues with Windows 7 but I hope they won't force an upgrade to 8 anytime soon.

Edited by Rosemary Hawkins

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When my mother's XP PC died last year, the easiest way I found of getting a Windows 7 PC (vice the dreaded Windows 8) was to get a refurbished system via the Amazon Market Place (UK). The company we used was Sam's Computers. Ended up with a tower, 19" screen and keyboard for just under £150. Obviously depends on what 'bells and whistles' you want, but her system works just fine. And at 85, she coped remarkably well with the upgrade to Win 7:)

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This turned into a useful thread. It has pretty well cemented my decision to look around for a Windows 7 machine.

 

For those of us with still-functioning Nikon film scanners, it is apparently possible to continue using the Nikon software with Windows 7. Has anyone tried fixes like the one linked to below?

 

http://www.exposedvisions.com/Win7%20Scans.htm

 

P.S. It looks a bit complicated to me.

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Thank you all for your replies, interested in the posting about "vmware" to run xp. Not sure what you mean as I'm still niave on computers, fine with Photoshop & what I need to know.

Libby

 

Just buy an external hard, format and install windows xp on that drive then use Vmware which allows you to run as many o.s. as you want/need. The same way as if you are using one with it already installed, everything will work the same way. I use Vmware all the time, its really great for running other o.s.    

 

If you want, i could do a step by step guide showing how to make it work?   

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Thanks patriotic, I would appreciate having the step by step guide.

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I'll have it done within the next few days or earlier, then I'll post a link on here.

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I guess it makes sense for us Windows XP dinosaurs to upgrade to the 64-bit rather than the 32-bit version of Windows 7. Correct?

 

Can I expect any major surprises when I try to run aging software and peripherals (e.g. HP printer/scanner) with the 64-bit version?

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I guess it makes sense for us Windows XP dinosaurs to upgrade to the 64-bit rather than the 32-bit version of Windows 7. Correct?

 

Can I expect any major surprises when I try to run aging software and peripherals (e.g. HP printer/scanner) with the 64-bit version?

As long as your pc meets the spec for 64bit, it might even be a tiny bit faster. you shouldn't have any problems, just make sure you get the latest drivers. 

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I guess it makes sense for us Windows XP dinosaurs to upgrade to the 64-bit rather than the 32-bit version of Windows 7. Correct?

 

Can I expect any major surprises when I try to run aging software and peripherals (e.g. HP printer/scanner) with the 64-bit version?

As long as your pc meets the spec for 64bit, it might even be a tiny bit faster. you shouldn't have any problems, just make sure you get the latest drivers. 

 

Thanks, my machine is a bit of a dinosaur too, so I'll be looking around for a new one of those too. What other advantages does the 64-bit version of Windows 7 have?

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I guess it makes sense for us Windows XP dinosaurs to upgrade to the 64-bit rather than the 32-bit version of Windows 7. Correct?

 

Can I expect any major surprises when I try to run aging software and peripherals (e.g. HP printer/scanner) with the 64-bit version?

As long as your pc meets the spec for 64bit, it might even be a tiny bit faster. you shouldn't have any problems, just make sure you get the latest drivers. 

 

Thanks, my machine is a bit of a dinosaur too, so I'll be looking around for a new one of those too. What other advantages does the 64-bit version of Windows 7 have?

 

64 Bit, is generally faster, 64 bit also  needs more than 4GB ram (memory) to be effective. This allows you to multi-task alot better e.g. photoshop etc instead of having two, three or more windows open, plus other needed applications; then finding your pc is lagging/slowing down and possibly crashing etc. On 64 bit, the more memory you have the more windows (applications)  you can have open without really affecting the operation of the pc  

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I guess it makes sense for us Windows XP dinosaurs to upgrade to the 64-bit rather than the 32-bit version of Windows 7. Correct?

 

Can I expect any major surprises when I try to run aging software and peripherals (e.g. HP printer/scanner) with the 64-bit version?

As long as your pc meets the spec for 64bit, it might even be a tiny bit faster. you shouldn't have any problems, just make sure you get the latest drivers. 

 

Thanks, my machine is a bit of a dinosaur too, so I'll be looking around for a new one of those too. What other advantages does the 64-bit version of Windows 7 have?

 

64 Bit, is generally faster, 64 bit also  needs more than 4GB ram (memory) to be effective. This allows you to multi-task alot better e.g. photoshop etc instead of having two, three or more windows open, plus other needed applications; then finding your pc is lagging/slowing down and possibly crashing etc. On 64 bit, the more memory you have the more windows (applications)  you can have open without really affecting the operation of the pc  

 

Thanks for that. I'm on it, as they say.

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I bought a Windows 7 Gateway computer for about $400 last fall and it's been working fine.  I transferred the images I cared about most from my XP computer before the Microsoft cutoff as well as  I could.  Then I just disconnected the ethernet cable on the XP so at least it can't be hacked.  The only thing I thought I would miss is being able to run my Minolta film scanners (5400 and Multipro) but I read of a trick where you download Vuescan for them first and then the Minolta software (which is out on some European site somewhere) will work.  It worked with my 5400; haven't tried the Multi Pro yet.  Other than that I don't have issues with Windows 7 but I hope they won't force an upgrade to 8 anytime soon.

 

Windows 7 will be supported until Jan 2020 under the Extended Support scheme (that has just ended for Windows XP), so plenty of time yet to get value for money from a new PC running 7.  http://support.microsoft.com/lifecycle/search/default.aspx?alpha=windows+7

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