Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
John Richmond

Dust on subject, not on sensor

Recommended Posts

Is it worth submitting images where there is obvious dust on the subject (or surroundings)?  For example on a dirty streetsign or around and in a reflection on still water.  Cleaning it up would take more time than would be worthwhile - but submitting uncleaned images could well fall foul of QC who might interpret the visible specks as sensor dust.  Especially if they were outwith the focal plane and blurred.

 

Any opinions?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I'm in New York City; find me a place on the city streets without dust and dirt and clutter. I think of my street images as Romantic Realism, that is I pick up candy wrappers and cigarette butts in Photoshop that call too much attention to themselves. I don't go for perfection, however. That would be and look unreal. The scene I usually give up on is the window of a Peking Duck restaurant in Chinatown. There are just too many duck-fat spots to deal with. Remember it's the 100% sized image that QC looks at. 

Edited by Ed Rooney

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It is not possible for me or anyone to answer the OP's question without seeing the image that

you are asking about. 

 

FYI  many of the images from 35mm scans that I have on Alamy I've spend hours spotting.  One image

that I worked on for almost two weeks has been licensed by Alamy over 20 times in two years.  In my opinion any

image that I start working on is worth the time spent completing.  That is also why my main account on

Alamy only has a bit more than 700 images posted.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If it were sensor dust, then they would expect to see the same appearing on other images if taken consecutively.  The kind of dust you mention is more likely to be confused with film dust, but QC isn’t likely to fail a digital image because you have a dusty film.   Anyway, film dust has a particular signature which you can easily see if you blow the image up 200%.

 

Which, as Ed has pointed out, just leaves the aesthetics.  I often removed spots and blobs from images of water purely for the look.  For the same reason I would probably leave the sign exactly as it is.  I might even add a few that I had removed from the water.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the answers, everyone.

 

Images where I have that problem are going to be few and far between - I simply rarely take them - but it's always good to have the benefit of others experience for future consideration.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Alamy QC would likely know the difference, but would the end client pass on such images and go for something where the photographer had taken a little more trouble? We have the tools, why not use them?

 

If you don't think it's worth the time, you might ask yourself if it's worth submitting.

 

Of course we should't over-scrub things

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Alamy QC would likely know the difference, but would the end client pass on such images and go for something where the photographer had taken a little more trouble? We have the tools, why not use them?

 

If you don't think it's worth the time, you might ask yourself if it's worth submitting.

 

Of course we should't over-scrub things

 

At the end of the day it's the intention, not the scrubbing that matters. I have scrubbed and polished images that sell repeatedly though usually for lowish prices (e.g D6HD28, also with Getty, Masterffile +++).  The intention is to create a clean, almost antiseptic, sometimes slightly alienating look.  On the other hand images that have sold for high/very high prices though perhaps not often** are much closer to what Ed Rooney above calls 'magic realism', although I would call 'realism'.  No scrubbing required.

 

RB

 

** Some just once  

Edited by Robert Brook

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.