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It looks a real poor sale price to me:

 

Country: Worldwide
Usage: Editorial
Media: Textbook - print and e-book
Print run: Unlimited
Placement: Inside
Image Size: 1 page
Start: 01 April 2014
End: 01 April 2024

 

price 112,00 $

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Hi Cristina - To me, it would depend on the photo, plus (things contributor unlikely to know) actual size, run, and time it's used.

(FWIW, I'm under impression that such usage rights listed can be much bigger than actual usage will be for particular image.) - Ann

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No' Cristina it is not fair, although Ann is right in what she has said here,  however we as contributors allowing 3rd parties to handle our business in the way of making our work available to others have no control to how much a license will be obtained for.

 

We all get such terrible fees at times,  i  have given up on finding out how my images are licensed,  it is not worth the pain and frustration.

 

A commercial photographer once told me,  stock photographers are monkeys being paid peanuts, i was not happy to hear what he said, although sometimes i think he is right.

 

Just keep on going and hope for better licences in the future,  it dose happen from time to time.

Edited by Paul Mayall
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I've had similar licenses sell for much less, e.g.:

Country: World English Language
Usage: Editorial
Media: Textbook - print and e-book
Print run: Unlimited
Placement: Inside
Image Size: 1 page
Start: 29 November 2013
End: 29 November 2023
$ 62.81

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You're right Paul! the only problem is that I am getting these kind of sales a little too often recently... Even micros pay better than that!

 

Not fair but given the current state of the market, I think it was a decent price comparitively speaking.

 

I'm not sure about your micro comment though....

 

This image was licensed from me through a micro agency in about the 2007 timeframe...

 

http://moodle2.rockyview.ab.ca/mod/book/tool/print/index.php?id=51990&chapterid=25368

 

My royalty was 25 cents.

 

It's why I don't contribute to them anymore.

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Cristina.

Check the dates & usage on THIS one !!

 

Country: Worldwide
Usage: Editorial
Media: Textbook - print and e-book
Print run: Unlimited
Placement: Inside
Image Size: 2 page spread
Start: 01 July 2013
End: 01 July 2038
All terms and rights granted as per the Alamy Preferred Vendor Agreement dated 26th January 2010 prevail. Flat rate per image, license period 20 years. $180 ????

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Hi Colin I had the same sale as yours last month! Very sad!!!

I occasionally lease images to textbook publishers through my own website. When I do, I always charge significantly more than Alamy does with no complaints from buyers. This leads me to believe that this particular market could bear more. Mind you, I don't have to do bulk deals. Also, almost all of the textbook clients who approach me are based in the USA, which is probably still the best place to sell images at fairer prices.

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Hi Colin I had the same sale as yours last month! Very sad!!!

I occasionally lease images to textbook publishers through my own website. When I do, I always charge significantly more than Alamy does with no complaints from buyers. This leads me to believe that this particular market could bear more. Mind you, I don't have to do bulk deals. Also, almost all of the textbook clients who approach me are based in the USA, which is probably still the best place to sell images at fairer prices.

 

I'm with John on this one. Just had a bunch of direct sales to two US textbook publishers. 100,000 max print-run, up to one page in size, worldwide distribution, license good for 10 years and my fees started at $296 per image and topped out at $399 for a particularly difficult to get image. No complaints and payment received in a timely fashion.

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Hi Colin I had the same sale as yours last month! Very sad!!!

I occasionally lease images to textbook publishers through my own website. When I do, I always charge significantly more than Alamy does with no complaints from buyers. This leads me to believe that this particular market could bear more. Mind you, I don't have to do bulk deals. Also, almost all of the textbook clients who approach me are based in the USA, which is probably still the best place to sell images at fairer prices.

 

I'm with John on this one. Just had a bunch of direct sales to two US textbook publishers. 100,000 max print-run, up to one page in size, worldwide distribution, license good for 10 years and my fees started at $296 per image and topped out at $399 for a particularly difficult to get image. No complaints and payment received in a timely fashion.

 

My most recent textbook sale thru my website was for $378. I got to keep all of it and received payment within 30 days. Mind you, I appreciate that Alamy is in a very different competitive position than a little guy like me. Also, what I lose in profit per image on Alamy, I certainly make up for in volume of sales. I'm very pleased about that aspect of the equation.

Edited by John Mitchell
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Is this one fair?

 

Country: Worldwide
Usage: Editorial
Media: Textbook - print and e-book
Print run: Unlimited
Placement: Inside
Image Size: 2 page spread
Start: 01 January 2015
End: 01 January 2040
Re-clearing of an existing Edition/ Program. All terms and rights granted as per the Alamy Preferred Vendor Agreement dated 26th January 2010 prevail. Flat rate per image, license period 20 years.

$ 88.82

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I am not sure if you consider it fair or not. What you get for an image is what the client is willing to pay. I use stock photography to make images available that I may not otherwise sell directly to clients. Usually from projects I assign myself. I don't look at stock as a way to pay the bills, just another way to get some income for my images. I know that on other sites I get pennies for some of the sales. I don't even bother trying to track who purchased the rights, it isn't worth the time and I don't want to know who would rather buy stock than hire directly for a specific shoot.

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I guess I should re-design my website to be able to sell directly as well... If I can find any spare free time...

I use PhotoShelter, which has e-commerce and a price calculator that allows you to set prices. However, I find that most clients (such as they are these days) contact me to discuss pricing. I've had some good direct downloads come out of the blue, though.

 

Good luck.

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