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Sheila, the first thing you have to do is distract a Big Red, and when she looks a way you reach into her pouch an grab her joey. You run over to another big red (They can be taller than Mohammad Ali), a lonely looking one, and hand her the joey. Then you get a box jelly fish and play with it a bit. Only then do you hug the young koala, being careful of its sharp claws and pee. (They don't like you to call them marsupials, by the way.) Finally, you pet a common brown on the nose, and even if you don't get Australian Koala Bear Flu by then, you'll wish you had. 

 

:wacko:

The same goes for the eastern grey but you might start this if you nick their joeys:

 

36552089.BoxingkangasforFM.jpg

 

Ouch...But the biggest irritation is this cockie.  Beautiful to look at and such characters but beware, they will eat your timber house and decking without a second thought:

110553508.CwfNSgW2.Sulphurcrestedcockato

 

Ed, you missed out the great white - fortunately, I don't have a pic of one!

 

Sheila

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Ed. I agree with Sheila about the Great White shark. But not to worry, there won't be many left soon. The mental giants in government in one of our States are culling them. Stupidity knows no bounds.

 

Ken

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Ed. I agree with Sheila about the Great White shark. But not to worry, there won't be many left soon. The mental giants in government in one of our States are culling them. Stupidity knows no bounds.

 

Ken

 

As stupid (and unpopular) as the Western Australian government's response is, it shouldn't be forgotten that it's been more than 75 years since the New South Wales Government first began funding shark nets along its beaches. And in Queensland, a shark control program (including nets) began in 1962. Stupidity is more wide-spread than the focus on WA would at first indicate :-(

 

dd

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A hug is always welcome, Julie. :) 

 

In The early '70s I worked on a feature documentary called Blue Water White Death. I came into editing room at night when everyone else had gone home and used a big shark book to ID the correct animals in the clips of footage. Yes, it's true: I've had some of the strangest jobs on Earth.

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A hug is always welcome, Julie. :)

 

In The early '70s I worked on a feature documentary called Blue Water White Death. I came into editing room at night when everyone else had gone home and used a big shark book to ID the correct animals in the clips of footage. Yes, it's true: I've had some of the strangest jobs on Earth.

 

Ed, you continue to amaze :-)  . . . I remember the movie very well, it was ground-breaking photography, and was particularly popular here in Australia. Despite their early history of madly killing every bloody shark they could get to, the photographers of this documentary, Ron and Val Taylor, did a completer turn-around and became champions for the conservation of sharks. We could do with more of their latter-day selves over here now.

 

OT, but perhaps related to your early music career, Harry Chapin was involved in the production somehow I once read . . . true?

 

dd

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I'd avoid confrontation on any big city public transportation. You never know. My brother had a neighbor who had a gun pulled on him on the El in Chicago. According to witnesses, he said, "That's not a real gun." Unfortunately it was and that was the last thing he said.

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Curiouser and curiouser. Harry Chapin's brother Tom, also a folk singer, was in the film. Peter Gimble, of the department store family, produced and directed the film. My close friend, John Maddox (sometimes called Ray or Scott) was the film editor. I don't know that Harry Chapin had any involvement. 

 

But . . . several years after BWWD I went to Australia to do a shoot for PanAm, and who did I run into on Heron Island but Val Taylor. We stayed up two nights filming the sea turtles laying their eggs. 

Edited by Ed Rooney
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Curiouser and curiouser. Harry Chapin's brother Tom, also a folk singer, was in the film. Peter Gimble, of the department store family, produced and directed the film. My close friend, John Maddox (sometimes called Ray or Scott) was the film editor. I don't know that Harry Chapin had any involvement. 

 

But . . . several years after BWWD I went to Australia to do a shoot for PanAm, and who did I run into on Heron Island but Val Taylor. We stayed up two nights filming the sea turtles laying their eggs. 

 

Ed, please don't ever try to tell me you struggle for ideas of what to write about on your blog :-)

 

I'm very familiar with the work of Tom Chapin, as I am of the much-missed Harry. Sadly, never met either.

 

dd

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